BN.com Gift Guide

Hardcore Zen: Punk Rock, Monster Movies, and the Truth about Reality

( 16 )

Overview

This is not your typical Zen book. Brad Warner, a young punk who grew up to be a Zen master, spares no one. This bold new approach to the "Why?" of Zen Buddhism is as strongly grounded in the tradition of Zen as it is utterly revolutionary. Warner's voice is hilarious, and he calls on the wisdom of everyone from punk and pop culture icons to the Buddha himself to make sure his points come through loud and clear. As it prods readers to question everything, Hardcore Zen is both an approach and a departure, leaving ...

See more details below
Paperback
$11.42
BN.com price
(Save 23%)$14.95 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (67) from $1.99   
  • New (15) from $4.96   
  • Used (52) from $1.99   
Hardcore Zen: Punk Rock, Monster Movies and the Truth About Reality

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$10.89
BN.com price

Overview

This is not your typical Zen book. Brad Warner, a young punk who grew up to be a Zen master, spares no one. This bold new approach to the "Why?" of Zen Buddhism is as strongly grounded in the tradition of Zen as it is utterly revolutionary. Warner's voice is hilarious, and he calls on the wisdom of everyone from punk and pop culture icons to the Buddha himself to make sure his points come through loud and clear. As it prods readers to question everything, Hardcore Zen is both an approach and a departure, leaving behind the soft and lyrical for the gritty and stark perspective of a new generation.

The subtitle says it all: there has never been a book like this.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

About.com
"FIVE STARS. An engrossing and entertaining Chicken Soup for the Anarchist, Over-Intellectualizing Soul."
Janwillem van de Wetering
"Man oh man, this is a VERY good book."
Shambhala Sun
"Here's an autobiography of a quite different flavor. It's full of sly irreverence snappy references to contemporary culture, and amusing tangents. Warner brings messages of substance on many introductory Buddhist topics: Zen retreat, meditation, the precepts, reincarnation etc. For my money, Hardcore Zen is worth two or three of those Buddhism-for-Young-People books."
Tricycle
"Warner's path from inner anarchy to the Heart Sutra ('which profoundly rocked my world') will no doubt resonate with many twenty- and thirty-somethings. Hardcore Zen is Be Here Now for now."
Bill Stevenson
"You need to read this book."
Booklist
"The last thing Buddha reportedly told his followers was to question authority, which is something Brad Warner, as bass player in an Ohio hardcore band and later a toiler on Japanese B-movies, could relate to. Oh, he studied with a Zen master in Japan, too, but pretty obviously, he isn't your typical Buddhist priest, and Hardcore Zen isn't your typical Buddhist book. Warner brings the same tough, skeptical attitude to Zen that he brought to punk rock. Profane and sometimes irreverent; capable of devastating, corrosive humor; Warner pulls no punches. His book is an honest account of his search for truth."
Foreword
"Readers are likely to finish Hardcore Zen with a wider understanding of the vast array of human spiritual ideas."
Boston Globe
"In Hardcore Zen [...] Brad Warner tells a lively story of his odyssey from living as a punk rocker in rural Ohio to making B-grade Japanese horror flicks to becoming a Zen priest in Tokyo. A veteran of punk bands Zero Defex and Dementia 13, Warner has practiced zazen (the Zen term for "sitting meditation") for over 15 years, and a couple years ago received Shiho, or Dharma Transmission—formal acknowledgment that he has attained the same enlightenment as the Buddha. [ . . . ] The fundamental practices of punk and Buddhism—thrashing in a pit versus sitting in quiet meditation—might seem irreconcilable. And yet, Warner writes, 'in its early days, punk had a lot in common with Zen,' the strand of Buddhism that emerged in China around the seventh century and eventually flourished in Japan. 'The attitude of not conforming blindly to society is an important aspect of Buddhist teaching."
Publishers Weekly
There's a Zen story about a teacher who holds up his finger, then reminds his student to look beyond the finger itself, to what the finger is pointing at-the moon. That's what this book does: it transcends itself-and with outrageous style. Warner, an early-'80s hardcore punk musician, discovered Zen in college, moved to Japan to make B-grade monster movies, and eventually became a bona fide Zen master by formally receiving "dharma transmission." Yet true to his punk spirit, he relentlessly demands that all teaching, all beliefs, all authority-including his own-must be questioned. ("Why should you listen to me? Who the hell am I?... No one. No one at all.") By turns wickedly funny, profane, challenging and iconoclastic-but always with genuine kindness-Warner devotes chapters to some common Zen notions such as the oneness of reality ("Why Gene Simmons Is Not a Zen Master"), reincarnation ("In My Next Life I Want to Come Back as a Pair of Lucy Liu's Panties") and the vital importance of the present moment ("Eating a Tangerine is Real Enlightenment"). Yet this is no litany of Zen orthodoxy designed for study. By liberally sharing anecdotes from his own life as a down-and-out punk rocker and maker of monster movies, Warner constantly focuses on the importance of a direct experience of reality in all its rawness over adherence to any set of beliefs-even Zen ones. Entertaining, bold and refreshingly direct, this book is likely to change the way one experiences other books about Zen-and maybe even the way one experiences reality. (Sept.) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
School Library Journal
Adult/High School-Warner has appropriated the phrase "Question authority," a longtime battle cry for the punk-rock aesthetic, for use as a Buddhist mantra. Much of his book is laid out like a memoir. Readers follow the author from high school and his interest in '70s rock music and philosophical thought through his musical career under names like Zero Defex and Dimentia 13 and finally to his dream job with the Japanese television studio that produces the popular live-action children's show, Ultra Man. The common threads throughout are a rabid interest in transcendental meditation and enlightenment. A conversational tone and endless streams of pop references to everything from Minor Threat to The Matrix movies make this a readable and even fun book. Warner stresses that enlightenment and meditation do not come easy, which separates his writing dramatically from many other Western books on Buddhism. It's nice to see someone with strong ties to rock coming down so hard on people like Terence McKenna or even the Beatles, who promoted drug use as a way toward higher thought. Although some of Warner's connections between Buddhism and the various pieces of pop culture are simplified, his idea of questioning is particularly striking. Not just questioning authority, but friends, oneself, and, yes, him. This wonderfully engaging primer just might get those more dubious, less willing readers to look at the world a bit differently.-Matthew L. Moffett, Northern Virginia Community College, Annandale Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780861713806
  • Publisher: Wisdom Publications MA
  • Publication date: 7/10/2005
  • Pages: 224
  • Sales rank: 237,264
  • Product dimensions: 5.02 (w) x 8.02 (h) x 0.61 (d)

Meet the Author

Brad Warner lives in California. He has studied Soto Zen with Gudo Wafu Nishijima. If there is such a thing as a Zen Master (and there isn't), he is one (and he's not). In the early 80s, he was the bassist for ODFx (or Zero Defex), a hardcore punk band. After ODFx bit the dust, he made five albums under the band name Dimentia 13. After living in Japan for some time, he returned to the United States in 2012 to start the Dogen Sangha of Los Angeles.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 16 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(9)

4 Star

(6)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 16 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 7, 2005

    Great book!

    I've read alot of books about buddhism, and this is the first one I've been able to follow. Punk rocker Warner knows how to explain buddhism to idots like me.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted December 27, 2012

    Love Brad's Work!

    Love Brad's Work!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 21, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Excellent

    Question everything because only you know what's the right way for you to be you. Compelling, interesting, a great read.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 4, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    After owning more than a hundred books on Buddhism

    I can't believe how clear (at least it speaks to me, greatly) and practical is this book and also Zen Wrapped In Karma Dipped In Chocolate, also by Brad Warner. He has finally given me the motivation to meditate, sit zazen, after years of procrastinating. Brad Warner's frankness and creativity are very refreshing and I appreciate his writing very much. I hope there might be another book on its way.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 1, 2006

    genx bodhisattva

    brad is a great teacher, i've been fortunate enough to practice with him. this book is a great, simple, and entertaining story that really cuts through the b.s. of zen and gets to the core of the practice. parts of the book really pissed me off at first reading, but then i went back and re-read and they made perfect sense. we must truly understand being present, living in the moment and accept reality (it ain't what you think) this is zen for gen x!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 3, 2004

    Great Read

    I've just finished reading this book and I am compelled to spread the word. Warner makes the basics of Buddhism accessible and even humorous. This book has helped me stop to examine my own life/reality, which is something that everyone can benefit from. I've never read up on Buddhism but I think this is a great introduction as Warner advises the reader to question authority and to live in the present. It's an informative, inspiring and enjoyable read.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 6, 2004

    Looking for a book that deals with reality?

    This is the book that spoke to me and made me feel in place. I feel more a part of everything. As a result I¿m more tolerable, peaceful and yet still living in reality (as real as I¿m currently able to comprehend and experience). I¿ve searched a long time for spiritual material that works for me and this did it. I¿ve bought copies for my entire family.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 7, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 20, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 27, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 23, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 28, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 5, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 2, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 9, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 29, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 16 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)