The Hardscrabble Chronicles

The Hardscrabble Chronicles

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by Laurie Bogart Morrow, Laurie Bogart Morrow
     
 

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For thirty years, from 1923 until 1953, legendary Field & Stream columnist Corey Ford owned the Lower Forty in a small New England town that he dubbed "Hardscrabble" to shield its identity. He regaled millions of readers with colorful stories of Hardscrabble's eccentric and eclectic townsfolk. Now, with The hardscrabble Chronicles, Laurie Bogart Morrow continues this

Overview

For thirty years, from 1923 until 1953, legendary Field & Stream columnist Corey Ford owned the Lower Forty in a small New England town that he dubbed "Hardscrabble" to shield its identity. He regaled millions of readers with colorful stories of Hardscrabble's eccentric and eclectic townsfolk. Now, with The hardscrabble Chronicles, Laurie Bogart Morrow continues this rich tradition... Hardscrabble could be any typical New England village. A place filled with common people living uncommon lives. The best of a disappearing breed called Yankees -- resolute, resilient, and resourceful folk who can be counted on in good times and in bad. These are their true stories, told by one of their own. A resident of Hardscrabble for thirty years, Laurie Bogart Morrow recounts the events that brought her as a young bride to this rural outpost, her family's brisk acceptance into the quaint rhythms of the village, and her subsequent fall into a lifelong love affair with country living, Hardscrabble, its no-nonsense, plain-speaking populace, and its loyal and lovable dogs.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
The foundation for this pseudobiographical fiction is a monthly Field & Stream column Corey Ford wrote in the 1950s and '60s about life in the pseudonymous town of Hardscrabble. Morrow, a resident of the same town, dusts off Ford's long-abandoned idea and is picking up where he left off, that's all. The result is a warm, sentimental portrait of a pastoral New England village and its eccentric citizens. Founded in 1630, the hamlet of Hardscrabble is home to law-abiding, church-going folk623 of them. Morrow recounts her and husband Kip's move from Long Island to Hardscrabble after Kip inherits a centuries-old house complete with drafty windows, a leaky ceiling and nosy (but helpful) neighbors. After Morrow bears a son, she goes to work writing an events column for the local paper, replacing town gossip Doris Almy. When Doris returns unexpectedly, Morrow relinquishes her byline, opting to write stories about the town and its people instead. What follows is a loose collection of misadventures, ranging from the heroic acts of canines to the official embarrassment of a naked senator. Decorated with pencil sketches, each chapter overflows with the rustic charm of Old Home Week Parades and grouse hunting (there's even a final chapter of recipes). Though the collective effect becomes a bit mawkish, Morrow's prose demonstrates a sweet fondness for her hometown and its quirky, Rockwellian characters. Readers waiting for any kind of exhilarating plot twist (or plot, for that matter) should look elsewhere. The calamity of natural deaths, frozen pipes and courtroom politics is about as perilous as it gets in Hardscrabble, and that's just what Morrow and her predecessor Ford seem to have had in mind. (May) Forecast: Readers of Yankee magazine are the natural audience for this novel, and New England bookstores should stock up. Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780425184622
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
05/07/2002
Pages:
336
Product dimensions:
5.78(w) x 8.54(h) x 1.18(d)

Meet the Author

Laurie Bogart Morrow is the author of eleven books including The Woman Angler, the Orvis Field Guide series, and the bestseller Cold Noses & Warm Hearts, and contributes to numerous outdoor magazines, including Sports Afield, Field & Stream, Just Labs, and Sporting Classics.

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Hardscrabble Chronicles 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
If you're an old fan of Cory Ford and Robert Ruark from the old Field & Stream days of the 50's & 60's, there's a real flavor of the humor and quirkyness of those old columns with a more up to date slant. You old chauvinists shouldn't worry about a woman writing this kind of book; her gender is pretty transparent and she's an absolute delight to read. I'm ready to step up and order some more of her books.