Harley Loco: A Memoir of Hard Living, Hair, and Post-Punk, from the Middle East to the Lower East Side

( 8 )

Overview

“Twisted, devastating . . . A classic, blood-stained love letter to bohemian NYC.” —Craig Marks

When Rayya Elias was seven, her family fled their native Syria to settle in Detroit. Bullied in school and rebelling against her traditional home-life, Rayya turned her sights to fashion and music. She became a hairdresser and started a band that played the club scene in the early 1980s before she moved to New York at age twenty-three to further her musical career. She lived on the ...

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Harley Loco: A Memoir of Hard Living, Hair, and Post-Punk, from the Middle East to the LowerEast Side

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Overview

“Twisted, devastating . . . A classic, blood-stained love letter to bohemian NYC.” —Craig Marks

When Rayya Elias was seven, her family fled their native Syria to settle in Detroit. Bullied in school and rebelling against her traditional home-life, Rayya turned her sights to fashion and music. She became a hairdresser and started a band that played the club scene in the early 1980s before she moved to New York at age twenty-three to further her musical career. She lived on the Lower East Side at the height of the punk movement and had passionate affairs with both sexes, but her casual drug use turned to addiction and Rayya was often homeless—between her visits to jail. Yet, her passion for life always saved her.

A rough and rollicking journey of courage and persistence against all odds that is told with a keen sense of humor and a lack of self-pity, Harley Loco is an unforgettable story about pursuing—not always by choice—a life of extremes until finally arriving at a place of contentment and peace.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
You know you’re in for a memoir of dysfunction, depression, drugs, drink, and despair when Elias declares that as a child “being bad was what I did best.” By the time she was seven, she and her family had left Syria because of increasing political and religious tensions and moved to Detroit, because of its large Arabic community, to start a new life. Elias soon discovers that there will never be a better life, for her parents were more interested in using America for what they can get from it than in Americanizing. Bullied at school and failing to fit in at home or at school, Elias remains an outsider trying to find a way into a circle of friends and into this new world; soon enough, she has rejected so much that there is a void inside her, and she starts to fill that void with drugs, sex, and punk rock, hardening herself against the pain. In this compulsively page-turning memoir of her search for herself, Elias takes us on a tour of her hell as she moves from Detroit to New York’s Lower East Side; once in New York, she sells drugs, does drugs, discovers new and more powerful drugs, falls in and out of love, becomes an award-winning hair stylist, performs with punk when she can, goes to jail, and eventually hits bottom and goes straight. Haunting and mesmerizing, Elias’s story captures powerfully the vulnerability of being an outsider and the deep yearnings to be a part of something, to fit in. (Apr.)
Library Journal
Syrian-born Elias reports on four decades absorbed first in the punk movement on New York's Lower East Side and then as a drug addict who finally achieved redemption.
Kirkus Reviews
A junkie's-eye view of three decades of addiction in Detroit and on the Lower East Side of Manhattan. First-time author Elias, who has been clean since 1997, has enough distance to speak on her past unashamedly, with cleareyed intelligence and without judging her younger self too harshly. The youngest child of a prosperous Syrian family that immigrated to the suburbs of Detroit in the 1960s when she was 8, the author suggests her addictions were a response to the disruption that alienated her from her happy childhood in Syria. Her perspective remained that of the feisty little girl who fought back against bullies and earned the respect of her peers through a kind of reckless experimentation and a constant need to prove herself. "I always knew I couldn't be ‘the best of the best,' " she writes. "I think at a very young age I decided to become ‘the best of the worst,' which seemed to attract even more attention." Rather than take the path toward bourgeois security taken by her older siblings, Elias started a post-punk band, earning a living as a hairdresser. In New York, her dual careers seemed ready to take off, but her personal life was more complicated. While living unhappily with an adoring boyfriend, she fell deeply in love with a married woman who declined to leave her husband. Elias self-medicated with ecstasy, cocaine, heroin and Valium--anything to ease the pain--and soon found herself helplessly addicted. When snorting heroin became too expensive, a punk-scene friend reluctantly introduced her to mainlining. Thus began a descent into street life, homelessness, petty crime and jail time, alternating with temporary spans of redemption and health followed by heart-breaking relapse. Though slow to get going, the second half of this memoir is strong stuff, with some truly amazing stories well-told.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780143125051
  • Publisher: Viking Penguin
  • Publication date: 3/25/2014
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 320
  • Sales rank: 1,404,580
  • Product dimensions: 5.39 (w) x 8.10 (h) x 0.71 (d)

Meet the Author

Rayya Elias

Rayya Elias was born in Aleppo, Syria, in 1960 and moved to Detroit in 1967. She is a musician, hairdresser, filmmaker, and also sells real estate to make some extra scratch. She lives in New York City and Little York, New Jersey.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 8 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 12, 2013

    I was asked to review Harley Loco, a memoir written by a gay ex-

    I was asked to review Harley Loco, a memoir written by a gay ex-junkie hairdresser who was born in Syria and made her way to the drug capital known as the East Village (via Detroit) where she made her name as a hairdresser/punk rock musician (yes, musician) while skipping, like Dorothy going to Oz, through all the rungs of junkie hell. I didn't want to read this book. First of all, I have personal knowledge of the Christian/middle-eastern family structure and any one of this brave girl's trifecta of secrets would take her out. For myself, a book about a world-class junkie who was also a world-class hairdresser? No. I was going on a long train ride and it was on my Kindle so I took a peek. I was surprised to see a preface by Elizabeth Gilbert of Eat, Pray Love, a memoir I found difficult to swallow whole hog. Yet I was intrigued by Gilbert's unabashed adoration of Ms. Elias and her book.

    There are people who don't want - can't stand - an ordinary life. I know what that feels like. Rayya Elias, the narrator of this absorbing memoir could not tolerate being ordinary. If Eat, Pray, Love varnished the truth to make a good story, Elias left her truth beautifully unvarnished in Harley Loco and wrote a compelling memoir that pulled me in completely. Elias is a brave soul who is a magician at yanking her life out of the fire just as it begins to look like a descent into hard misery or worse. It's like reading a book version of The Perils of Pauline except Elias' perils are heartbreakingly real. With memoirs of the harrowing kind, you want to see redemption, you want a happy ending. This impressive memoir of a gay Syrian hairdresser with a musical bent whose demons come close to destroying her countless times is the happiest of endings.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 14, 2014

    Ariel

    Looks around and leans against the wallc

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 13, 2014

    To foxy or shade

    I want to join! ~ Amber~

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 13, 2014

    Death

    Ok.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 13, 2014

    Masonvto shade

    I join

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 13, 2014

    Shade

    *makes the list*

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 14, 2014

    Foxy to all

    We r moving to Harley Davidson all res. Meet me in res 2 if u want to join.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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