Harold Bloom's Shakespeare

Overview

Harold Bloom is one of the most influential and controversial of contemporary Shakespeare critics. These essays examine the sources and impact of Bloom's Shakespearean criticism from a variety of theoretical and political positions. Through focused and sustained study of Bloom as literary icon and of his Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human, they address a wide range of issues, from the cultural role of Shakespeare to the ethics of literary theory and criticism. Harold Bloom's Shakespeare brings together ...
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Overview

Harold Bloom is one of the most influential and controversial of contemporary Shakespeare critics. These essays examine the sources and impact of Bloom's Shakespearean criticism from a variety of theoretical and political positions. Through focused and sustained study of Bloom as literary icon and of his Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human, they address a wide range of issues, from the cultural role of Shakespeare to the ethics of literary theory and criticism. Harold Bloom's Shakespeare brings together well-known Shakespearean critics and younger voices from within the profession. Collectively, the authors of these essays provide a fresh look at literary history and suggest new directions being taken by leading literary theorists. Through the lens of contemporary opinions about the Bard, Harold Bloom's Shakespeare offers a broad understanding of the state of literary studies in our time.
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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Bloom's exhaustive examination of all of Shakespeare's plays, Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human, was published in 1998 to great critical acclaim and became a best seller, a rarity for a literary study. Bloom's veneration of the Bard and his dismissal of most contemporary Shakespearean criticism, however, has made him a target for scholars who do not share his opinions. This collection of 18 essays, which came about at a 2000 conference in Toronto of the Shakespeare Association of America, examines Bloom and his theories. Three of the articles praise Bloom's book, ten are opposed to most aspects of his work, and five are mixed. The essays run the gamut of present-day critical studies, ranging from historical and character perspectives to criticism with feminist or racial slants on individual plays or themes. Primarily for scholars who are fascinated by literary controversies, this book is recommended for graduate-level collections in academic libraries. Morris Hounion, New York City Technical Coll. Lib., Brooklyn Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
From the Publisher
The essays run the gamut of present-day critical studies... Library Jourbanal
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780312239558
  • Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
  • Publication date: 1/1/2002
  • Edition description: REV
  • Pages: 320
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.81 (d)

Meet the Author

Christy Desmet is Associate Professor of English at the University of Georgia. She is the author of Reading Shakespeare's Characters: Rhetoric, Ethics, and Identity, and co-editor of Shakespeare and Appropriation.

Robert Sawyer is Assistant Professor of English at East Tennessee State University, and co-editor of Shakespeare and Appropriation.

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Table of Contents

Contributors
Acknowledgments
Introduction 1
Pt. 1 Bardolatry/Bardography
1 Bloom's Shakespeare 19
2 Bloom with a View 27
3 The Case for Bardolatry: Harold Bloom Rescues Shakespeare from the Critics 33
4 Power, Pathos, Character 43
5 Inventing Us 65
Pt. 2 Reading and Writing Shakespearean Character
6 Bloom, Bardolatry, and Characterolatry 71
7 On the Value of Being a Cartoon, in Literature and in Life 81
8 Shakespeare: The Orientation of the Human 97
9 "The play's the thing": Shakespeare's Critique of Character (and Harold Bloom) 109
10 On Harold Bloom's Nontheatrical Praise for Shakespeare's Lovers: Much Ado About Nothing and Antony and Cleopatra 125
Pt. 3 Anxieties of Influence
11 Romanticism Lost: Bloom and the Twilight of Literary Shakespeare 145
12 Looking for Mr. Goodbard: Swinburne, Resentment Criticism, and the Invention of Harold Bloom 167
13 Shakespeare and the Invention of Humanism: Bloom on Race and Ethnicity 181
14 Shakespeare in Transit: Bloom, Shakespeare, and Contemporary Women's Writing 199
Pt. 4 Shakespeare as Cultural Capital
15 Harold Bloom as Shakespearean Pedagogue 213
16 King Lear in Their Time: On Bloom and Cavell on Shakespeare 227
17 "I am sure this Shakespeare will not do": Anti-Semitism and the Limits of Bardolatry 247
18 The 2% Solution: What Harold Bloom Forgot 259
References 269
Index 287
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