Harriet Tubman

Harriet Tubman

by George E. Sullivan
     
 

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This unique biography of Harriet Tubman uses interviews with Tubman, as well as writings from her contemporaries, to tell the story of her life.

"There was one of two things I had a right to, liberty or death. If I could not have one, I would have the other, for no man should take me alive"

Born into slavery on a southern plantation, Harriet Tubman dreamed of

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Overview

This unique biography of Harriet Tubman uses interviews with Tubman, as well as writings from her contemporaries, to tell the story of her life.

"There was one of two things I had a right to, liberty or death. If I could not have one, I would have the other, for no man should take me alive"

Born into slavery on a southern plantation, Harriet Tubman dreamed of the Promised Land to the North. After escaping slavery herself, she repeatedly returned to the South to lead more than 300 other slaves to freedom in the North via the Underground Railroad. During the Civil War, Tubman served as a Union spy. Later in life she established a home for the sick and needy in Auburn, NY. Tubman's faith and determination guided her throughout her long and eventful life.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
The biography of Harriet Tubman by George Sullivan is an inspiring account of a young slave woman who escaped to the North in the mid-1800s and later became a freedom fighter in her effort to end slavery. Tubman became involved in the Underground Railroad and eventually guided more than 300 slaves to their freedom. In addition to this difficult and dangerous work, she also served as a Union spy and nurse during the Civil War and established a home for the sick and needy in Auburn, New York. Author Sullivan tells the story of a true humanitarian who always thought more about others than herself. Harriet Tubman was called the "Moses" of her people. Despite a hard life of slavery, injury and illness, this young woman was determined to be a free person. George Sullivan conveys the story of Tubman in short chapters that flow nicely throughout the book. Quotes from the subject add a nice touch of authenticity to the retelling of her life. Illustrations are good black-and-white photographs. 2001, Scholastic, Yannuzzi
School Library Journal
Gr 3-6-At the beginning of each volume, Sullivan discusses the differences between primary and secondary sources and the importance of utilizing primary sources whenever possible. Tubman is based on a biography published in 1869 that includes numerous quotes, as well as secondary sources. It chronicles the woman's life from her birth as a slave to Underground Railroad "conductor" to community service and suffragette work in her later years. Pocahontas relies heavily on the writings of Captain John Smith and others who knew Pocahontas and will likely disappoint readers interested in her own words, given the series title. Although informative, it is primarily a history of the Virginia colony, Jamestown settlement, and the struggle between the Native Americans and the settlers at the time. Information about Pocahontas helping Captain Smith and the settlers, her marriage to John Rolfe, and her travels to England is minimal (mainly due to the lack of primary sources). Both titles are highly readable and well organized; they have short chapters with large text and widely spaced lines. Period maps, reproductions, and black-and-white photographs accompany the texts.-Shauna Yusko, King County Library System, Bellevue, WA Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780439326674
Publisher:
Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date:
03/28/2002
Series:
In Their Own Words Series
Pages:
128
Product dimensions:
5.40(w) x 7.80(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

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