Harriet Tubman: Antislavery Activist

Harriet Tubman: Antislavery Activist

by Heather Lehr Wagner, M. W. Taylor, Marian Taylor
     
 

Risking capture and death at every turn, Harriet Tubman led more slaves to freedom than anyone else in American history.

Born into slavery on a Maryland plantation in 1820, Tubman first attempted to escape from bondage at the age of seven but was caught, savagely beaten, and put to work as a field laborer. Twenty years later, she finally made her way to the free

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Overview

Risking capture and death at every turn, Harriet Tubman led more slaves to freedom than anyone else in American history.

Born into slavery on a Maryland plantation in 1820, Tubman first attempted to escape from bondage at the age of seven but was caught, savagely beaten, and put to work as a field laborer. Twenty years later, she finally made her way to the free North, where she began her career as a conductor on the Underground Railroad, an informal network of northerners who helped runaway slaves. Between 1850 and 1860, she returned to the South again and again to guide more than 300 blacks, incuding her parents, to freedom.

At the outbreak of the Civil War, Tubman went to South Carolina to assist the Union army. As a nurse, she helped care for thousands of newly freed slaves; as a spy, she made deep inroads into enemy territory; as a commando, she led a series of devastating raids on Confederate positions. After the war ended, she continued to serve those in need, offering food and shelter to the homeless. In her final years, she helped build a home for old and impoverished blacks in her adopted town of Auburn, New York.

Popularly known as "the Moses of her people," Tubman was motivated by her sense of justice and duty rather than a desire for personal gain or glory. "I know of no one who has willingly encountered more perils and hardships to serve our enslaved people than you have," the abolitionist Frederick Douglass told her. "The midnight sky and the silent stars have been the witness of your devotion to freedom and of your heroism."

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Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
Gr 5-8-- A noteworthy volume on the life and adventures of Tubman. Beginning with her tough and often brutal treatment as a young child in slavery, Taylor traces the development of an unconventional and heroic woman into one of the most famous conductors on the Underground Railroad. Readers also learn of Tubman's work both during and after the Civil War. Taylor does a good job of melding primary materials, especially in the use of Sarah Bradford's classic 1869 biography, currently available under the title, Harriet Tubman: The Moses of Her People (Peter Smith, 1974). As in other entries in the series, the books recommended for further reading are excellent, and the illustrations and photographs informative (although some have been recycled from previous works in this series). A good, solid biography. --Elizabeth M. Reardon, McCallie School, Chattanooga, TN

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780791081662
Publisher:
Facts on File, Incorporated
Publication date:
09/28/2004
Series:
Black Americans of Achievement Series
Edition description:
Library Edition
Pages:
120
Product dimensions:
6.40(w) x 9.30(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
6 - 12 Years

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