Harry and Horsie

( 1 )

Overview

When a boy named Harry

sneaks out of bed one night

with his best friend, Horsie,

to play with his Super Duper Bubble Blooper --

an out-of-this-world adventure begins!

Illustrated with retro-comic art, this is a charming story about the power of friendship and imagination from a talented new team.

...
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Overview

When a boy named Harry

sneaks out of bed one night

with his best friend, Horsie,

to play with his Super Duper Bubble Blooper --

an out-of-this-world adventure begins!

Illustrated with retro-comic art, this is a charming story about the power of friendship and imagination from a talented new team.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Booklist
With dashing visuals that capture Harry’s deep space adventure with verve to spare, and a comforting resolution, [HARRY AND HORSIE} has potential to become a bedtime favorite.
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A Fall 2009 Kid’s Indie Next PickHuffington Post “Best Children’s Picture Books of 2009”
Booklist
With dashing visuals that capture Harry’s deep space adventure with verve to spare, and a comforting resolution, [HARRY AND HORSIE} has potential to become a bedtime favorite.
Publishers Weekly
Pop art à la Roy Lichtenstein lends a retro vibe to this debut for both Van Camp and Agnew, about a boy and his sidekick, a toy horse. On a moonlit night, Harry lies awake in his bedroom, where planets, stars and rockets hang from the ceiling, and eyes his soap-bubble ray gun. “Wherever Harry went, Horsie went too, so they crept across the room” to grab the Super Duper Bubble Blooper. The Blooper's enormous bubbles float Harry's toys out the window, lofting the helpless rag doll Horsie into outer space. Harry dons a helmet and rides a streamlined rocket to the rescue, passing by his racecars, seen tearing around the rings of Saturn, and his kitten, lolling about in the Milky Way. Agnew's 1960s-style illustrations, in high-contrast black and white with faded blue, yellow and red accents, resemble screen prints from the Sunday funnies, complete with movement and sound effects (“zooom!!!”). Silhouetted cityscapes and planets serve as backgrounds, and Harry strikes several heroic poses while saving Horsie (who doesn't display much personality). A typical dream sequence, significantly elevated by the art. Ages 3–6. (Sept.)
Children's Literature - Barbara L. Talcroft
With more than a nod to Winsor McCay's Little Nemo in Slumberland and Maurice Sendak's In the Night Kitchen, Canadians Van Camp and Agnew offer a nighttime adventure (a debut for each) in the form of a graphic novel for toddlers. First his toys and then big-eyed Harry (modeled after David Letterman's small son) and his favorite Horsie get bounced out their bedroom window by Harry's Super Duper Bubble Blooper (Bloop!) and take off into space. When Horsie is whisked away, Harry jumps aboard his rocket ship and takes off (Zoom!) to find his friend; somehow the cat has come along, too. Blasting past Venus and Mars—Little Nemo visited the Moon and Mars—and sighting his toy cars whizzing around Saturn's rings, Harry navigates the Milky Way, finally spotting Horsie hanging onto the crescent Moon. Rescue accomplished, the friends drop back into their window and fall happily asleep in Harry's bed. Agnew's pictures (in bold black-and-white, light blue, and splashes of red) burst with sharp diagonals, spheres, and a multitude of details for small listeners to examine. When Harry is at home, each picture is ringed with buildings and skyline, again reminiscent of McCay's and Sendak's cityscape—though not as ingenious, still fun to explore; posters, pennants and the toy cars on Saturn refer to Letterman's interest in Indy racing. Energetic Harry and cuddly Horsie bring youngest readers a wildly imaginative adventure with a satisfying ending. (But who is that robot still out there in space?) Reviewer: Barbara L. Talcroft
School Library Journal
PreS-K—Harry and his best friend, Horsie, are inseparable. One night, when he can't sleep, he climbs to the shelf that holds his new bubble-making machine. He creates bubbles that begin to surround objects in his room and float them out the window. That's not a problem until one of the diaphanous orbs picks up Horsie and silently drifts into outer space. Harry's adventure in rescuing his beloved stuffed animal is enhanced by retro-style, computer-generated illustrations in beige, blue, and black with touches of red and gold. Planets that hang from Harry's ceiling, a crescent moon shining into his room, and the racecar posters decorating his walls all foreshadow the boy's quest. The intriguing pictures vary from one or two per page to entire spreads, creating interest and flow. This simple story looks as though it could have been written and illustrated in the 1950s, but it will appeal to today's readers.—Maryann H. Owen, Racine Public Library, WI
Kirkus Reviews
It's past bedtime, but Harry and Horsie are still awake, drawn to the Super Duper Bubble Blooper aglow in the moonlight. Tiptoeing out of bed, they soon fill the room with the effervescent globules. So plentiful are the bubbles that to Harry's boisterous delight, books, toys and shoes begin to float out the window and into space. But when a bubble carries Horsie away, Harry's frivolity turns to fortitude. Dazzling rays emanate from the brave boy. With chest puffed forward and rocket ship in hand, he blasts off, determined to find his best friend. Through stardust he hurtles to save Horsie. Together they return home-and to bed-knowing no matter the adventure, they'll always be together. Van Camp's winsome text about a boy's spirited imagination is propelled by Agnew's dynamic illustrations. Done in a comic-book-inspired style, they burst with thrilling action and energy. Through silkscreen effect and the use of a four-color palette, they make the story feel both hip and classic. Young boys and space adventurers will adore this captivating, exuberant and contagious tale. (Picture book. 3-6)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780061755989
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 8/25/2009
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 412,856
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 9.70 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Katie Van Camp is a former dancer who, at the age of eighteen, moved to Shanghai, China, to open a ballet school and teach kindergarten. A few years later she headed to New York to work as an au pair for a little boy named Harry (and his best friend, Horsie), who inspired her to write both Cookiebot! and her first picture book, Harry and Horsie. Katie is now back in Asia, writing and teaching. She currently calls Tokyo home.

Lincoln Agnew once tried to build his own robot out of a plastic bucket, a broken microwave, and "technology," but sadly its abilities were limited to catching fire. Years later, after giving up on world domination, he attended the Alberta College of Art and Design, where he obtained degrees in both illustration and photography. Lincoln made his debut as a picture book illustrator with Harry and Horsie, for which he won the 2009 Society of Illustrators "The Original Art" Founder's Award as well as the Marion Vannett Ridgway Award. He is currently rebuilding that robot.

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Customer Reviews

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