Harry and Lulu

Harry and Lulu

by Arthur Yorinks, Martin Matje
     
 

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Lulu desperately wants a real dog. So you can imagine her frustration and anger when her parents hand her Harry, a stuffed dog! She doesn't realize, however, that stuffed animals have feelings, too, and Harry is no exception. He explains to her that he is a real dog--and that he's from France! Lulu is skeptical until he takes her there. Before Lulu knows it, she's…  See more details below

Overview

Lulu desperately wants a real dog. So you can imagine her frustration and anger when her parents hand her Harry, a stuffed dog! She doesn't realize, however, that stuffed animals have feelings, too, and Harry is no exception. He explains to her that he is a real dog--and that he's from France! Lulu is skeptical until he takes her there. Before Lulu knows it, she's having a ball. Illustrated.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Linnea Hendrickson
In a brilliantly written and illustrated picture book that is reminiscent of the Little Lulu comic strip, Bemelman's Madeline's Rescue, and the cartoon art and dark humor of Charles Addams, Lulu, "a wild maniac" child, and Harry, a bagel-loving toy dog (who in becoming real displays a personality that's a match for Lulu's) walk to Paris, where each makes a dramatic rescue of the other. Little do the parents, whose heads, significantly, are never visible, know about the secret life of their child. As for Harry, "like all dogs he had a heart as big as the moon or Jupiter," and meltingly looks at Lulu with "his dog brown eyes." In the end mean Lulu is transformed and "filled with dog love."
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2-An odd twist on the usual fantasy of a child who believes a toy is real. Lulu refuses to believe that Harry, the stuffed animal given to her instead of the pet she requests, is a real dog. Harry, for his part, is determined to prove himself. The tale has a happy ending when Harry saves Lulu's life and Lulu, in turn, saves Harry's. It is written in an arch, tongue-in-cheek style, full of strange inconsistencies (even for a fantasy). Harry and Lulu start out with an adversarial relationship; they snipe at one another verbally and, in disgust, Harry announces that he will return to France where he came from (even though he later confesses to being from Indiana). Lulu decides to accompany Harry even though she dislikes him, and they seem to walk to Paris over night. However, the watercolor-and-gouache cartoons do not show readers how this is accomplished. In Paris, Harry realizes that he loves Lulu and rescues her from the path of a speeding car, but the author gives readers little information to support this conversion. In addition, some spreads, like that of Lulu dressing for the trip to Paris, and the otherwise charming Parisian scenes, do little to advance the central story. Unlike Yorinks and Egielski's penultimate picture-book fantasy Hey, Al (Farrar, 1986), this effort lacks consistent internal logic and heart.-Kate McClelland, Perrot Memorial Library, Greenwich, CT Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Yorinks (The Miami Giant, 1995, etc.) captures a child in several deeply recognizable moments: the tantrum, the imaginary journey, the heartbreak of the wrong toy; the delight when it turns out to be the right one. Lulu, who has been whining for a dog, is finally given a toy stuffed poodle, and throws a fit. But one night, after five comic books and a mystery chapter, she discovers that Harry the stuffed poodle can talk. While he won't eat dog biscuits, he loves pumpernickel bagels. Facing an unconvinced Lulu, Harry says he is going back to France where he came from; Lulu dresses and goes with him. They wander down the street until they come across morning in Paris. Harry rescues Lulu from a crazed French driver and she rescues him from the Seine; cut back to Lulu's house, where her parents look on happily at the bedtime scene of Lulu and her toy. For Yorinks, that's an ending that is unequivocably upbeat. Matje's illustrations are happy, clean-lined, retro scenes, of a world where children and their dogs can go out for an all-night stroll. A Velveteen Rabbit for the '90s? Not exactly, but it has its moments. (Picture book. 4-8)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780786803354
Publisher:
Disney-Hyperion
Publication date:
03/15/1999
Edition description:
1st Edition
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.00(w) x 11.25(h) x 0.50(d)
Lexile:
AD360L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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