Harry Potter, Narnia, and the Lord of the Rings: What You Need to Know about Fantasy Books and Movies

Harry Potter, Narnia, and the Lord of the Rings: What You Need to Know about Fantasy Books and Movies

3.0 1
by Richard Abanes
     
 

Award—winningjournalist Richard Abanes clears away the confusion many readers experience over fantasy books and films. He delves into the differences between various forms of fantasy and digs out answers needed by every parent, youth worker, teacher, and student.

The stories of Tolkien, Lewis, and Rowling—and films based on them—have touched

…  See more details below

Overview

Award—winningjournalist Richard Abanes clears away the confusion many readers experience over fantasy books and films. He delves into the differences between various forms of fantasy and digs out answers needed by every parent, youth worker, teacher, and student.

The stories of Tolkien, Lewis, and Rowling—and films based on them—have touched millions of lives. How are these authors similar...and different? Where do they fit into today's ever—growing desire for the mystery and magic fantasy provides? Abanes—himself a fantasy and science—fiction fan—helps shed light on this form of entertainment and its effects on today's youth.

Readers will come away thoroughly equipped to differentiate between stories and films that are harmless, even inspiring—and those containing spiritual dangers.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780736917001
Publisher:
Harvest House Publishers
Publication date:
07/28/2005
Pages:
297
Product dimensions:
5.64(w) x 8.58(h) x 0.70(d)

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Harry Potter, Narnia, and the Lord of the Rings: What You Need to Know about Fantasy Books and Movies 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I found this book to be a fascinating examination of Christian themes within fantasy, but I only recommend it for adult readers who are able to discern moral objectives for themselves. This book is obviously a biased perspective towards fantasy as Abanes is Christian, and he basically says Phillip Pullman and J. K. Rowling are bad people who write literature that is not blatantly Christian, or in Pullman's case, blatantly athiest. A person who is easily influenced by what they read will read exclusively Tolkien and Lewis for the rest of their lives after this if they want to follow Abanes definition of Christianity. Read this if you can form your own opinions of literature and can maturely discern moral themes and influences on your own while reading.