Harvard Century / Edition 1

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Overview

The Harvard Century tells the story of how Harvard, America's oldest and foremost institution of higher learning, has become synonymous with the nation, their goals and standards reflecting each other, each setting the other's agenda. It is also a colorful and intimate narrative of the individual achievements of its leaders and of the intense power struggles that have shaped Harvard as it pioneered in setting the priorities that have served as exemplars for the nation's educational establishment.
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Editorial Reviews

New York Times Book Review

Mr. Smith fulfills his intentions with as readable an account of Harvard as we are likely to need for a while.
— Robert A. McCaughey

Change

We appear to be at a turning point in the evolution of colleges and universities in America. As in earlier periods of our history, the institutions of higher education are changing in response to the knowledge needs of society...In reading Richard Norton Smith's The Harvard Century one revisits those forces and personalities shaping our major universities during the decisive decades of their development as the centers for scientific research.
— Christopher N. Breiseth

New York Times Book Review - Robert A. McCaughey
Mr. Smith fulfills his intentions with as readable an account of Harvard as we are likely to need for a while.
Change - Christopher N. Breiseth
We appear to be at a turning point in the evolution of colleges and universities in America. As in earlier periods of our history, the institutions of higher education are changing in response to the knowledge needs of society...In reading Richard Norton Smith's The Harvard Century one revisits those forces and personalities shaping our major universities during the decisive decades of their development as the centers for scientific research.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780674372955
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • Publication date: 11/15/1998
  • Edition description: REPRINT
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 408
  • Sales rank: 952,823
  • Product dimensions: 6.14 (w) x 9.21 (h) x 0.84 (d)

Meet the Author

Richard Norton Smith is Director of the Gerald R. Ford Museum.
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Table of Contents

Prologue: The Country and the College

Introduction: Thinkers and Doers

The Soil and the Seed

The Great Assimilator

A Dorchester Mr. Chips

Mr. Conant Goes to War

Redbook, Red Scare

The Bishop from Appleton

Children of the Storm

The Education of Derek Bok

In Search of Coherence

Source Notes and Acknowledgments

Index

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 21, 2002

    Mostly Boring

    It is hard to imagine that this book will be of much interest to anyone who is unfamiliar with Harvard. For former students the relevant chapters may serve as a mostly boring trip down memory lane. For the real insiders such as professors or administrators or influential alumni it may prove to be more exciting. After finally finishing the book I can only conclude that a story about Harvard or maybe any academic institution is apt to be uninteresting. I feel the same way about the prospect of reading a history of IBM or Xerox - but someone else may find it thrilling.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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