Hatchepsut: The Female Pharoah

Overview

Egypt's Queen-or, as she would prefer to be remembered, King-Hatchepsut ruled over an age of peace, prosperity, and remarkable architectural achievement (c. 1490 b.c.). Had she been born a man, her reign would almost certainly have been remembered for its stable government, successful trade missions, and the construction of one of the most beautiful structures in the world-the Deir el-Bahri temple at Luxor. After her death, however, her name and image were viciously attacked, her monuments destroyed or usurped, ...

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Overview

Egypt's Queen-or, as she would prefer to be remembered, King-Hatchepsut ruled over an age of peace, prosperity, and remarkable architectural achievement (c. 1490 b.c.). Had she been born a man, her reign would almost certainly have been remembered for its stable government, successful trade missions, and the construction of one of the most beautiful structures in the world-the Deir el-Bahri temple at Luxor. After her death, however, her name and image were viciously attacked, her monuments destroyed or usurped, her place in history systematically obliterated. At last, in this dazzling work of archaeological and historical sleuthing, Joyce Tyldesley rescues this intriguing figure from more than two thousand years of oblivion and finally restores the female pharaoh to her rightful prominence as the first woman in recorded history to rule a nation.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780140244649
  • Publisher: Viking Penguin
  • Publication date: 7/28/1998
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 304
  • Sales rank: 501,180
  • Product dimensions: 5.10 (w) x 7.80 (h) x 0.79 (d)

Meet the Author

Joyce Tyldesley, holder of a doctorate from Oxford University, is Honorary Research Fellow at the School of Archaeology, Classics, and Oriental Studies at Liverpool University, England. She is the author of Hatchepsut: The Female Pharaoh and Daughters of Isis: Women of Ancient Eygpt.

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgements

Introduction
1. Backdrop: Egypt in the Early Eighteenth Dynasty
2. A Strong Family: The Tuthmosides
3. Queen of Egypt
4. King of Egypt
5. War and Peace
6. Propaganda in Stone
7. Senenmut: Greatest of the Great
8. The End and the Aftermath

Notes
Further Reading
Index

Plates

1. The Temple of Amen at Karnak. (Werner Foreman Archive)
2. The Valley of the Kings.
3. Hatchepsut as king offering before the barque of Amen. (Block from the Chapelle Rouge, Open-Air Museum, Karnak)
4. The God Amen. (Cairo Museum garden)
5. Seated statue of Hatchepsut from Djeser-Djeseru showing the king with a female body and male accessories. (The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Rogers Fund and Edward Harkness Gift, 1929 [29.3.2])
6. The near-identical figures for King Hatchepsut and King Tuthmosis III, Hatchepsut in front. (Block from the Chapelle Rouge, Open-Air Museum, Karnak)
7. Scene showing the gods crowning King Hatchepsut, which had been attacked in antiquity.
8. Head of Hatchepsut. (Cairo Museum)
9. Granite statue of Hatchepsut. (Open-Air Museum, Karnak)
10. Red granite sphinx of Hatchepsut. (The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Rogers Fund, 1931 [31.3.166])
11. The standing obelisk of Hatchepsut at the heart of the Temple of Amen, Karnak. (Werner Foreman Archive)
12. a) and b) Djeser-Djeseru.
13. Senenmut and the Princess Neferure. (Cairo Museum and British Museum)
14. Senenmut and Neferure.(Cairo Museum)
15. Osiride head of Hatchepsut. (Cairo Museum)
16. The carefully erased image of Hatchepsut. (Temple of Amen, Karnak)
17. Tuthmosis III. (Luxor Museum)

Figures

CHAPTER 1
1.1 The cartouche of King Sekenenre Tao II
1.2 The cartouche of King Kamose
1.3 The cartouche of King Ahmose
1.4 Old and New Kingdom soldiers (after Wilkinson, J. G., 1853, The Ancient Egyptians: their life and customs, London, Figs. 297, 300)
1.5 The god Amen (after Sharpe, S., 1859, The History of Egypt, London, Fig. 94)
1.6 The goddess Mut (after Seton-Williams, V. and Stocks, P., 1983, Blue Guide, Egypt, London and New York, p.48)

CHAPTER 2
2.1 King Ahmose and his grandmother, Queen Tetisheri (after Ayrton, E.R., Currelly, C.T. and Weigall, A.E.P, 1903, Abydos III, London, Plate LII)
2.2 The god Osiris (after Sharpe, S., 1859, The History of Egypt, London, Fig. 106)
2.3 The god Horus (after Sharpe, S., 1859, The History of Egypt, London, Fig. 108)
2.4 The cartouche of King Amenhotep I
2.5 The cartouche of King Tuthmosis I

CHAPTER 3
3.1 The infant Hatchepsut being suckled by the goddess Hathor (after Naville, E., 1896, The Temple of Deir el-Bahari, 2, London, Plate LIII)
3.2 A hippopotamus hunter (after Wilkinson, J. G., 1853, The Ancient Egyptians: their life and customs, London, Fig. 253)
3.3 The cartouche of King Tuthmosis II
3.4 Tuthmosis II (after Naville, E., 1906, The Temple of Deir el-Bahari, 5, London, Plate CXXXV)
3.5 Plan of Hatchepsut's first tomb (after Carter, H., 1917, A Tomb prepared for Queen Hatshepsuit and other recent discoveries at Thebes, Journal of Egyptian Archaeology 4, Plate 20)

CHAPTER 4
4.1 The cartouche of King Maatkare Hatchepsut
4.2 The pregnant Queen Ahmose is led to the birthing bower (after Naville, E., 1896, The Temple of Deir el-Bahari, 2, London, Plate XLIX)
4.3 The infant Hatchepsut in the arms of a divine nurse (after Naville, E., 1896, The Temple of Deir el-Bahari, 2, London, Plate LIII)
4.4 Hatchepsut and Amen on a block from the Chapelle Rouge
4.5 Plan of Hatchepsut's king's tomb (after Davis, T M., ed., 1906, The Tomb of Hatshopsitu, London, Plate 8)
4.6 The goddess Isis from the sarcophagus of Hatchepsut

CHAPTER 5
5.1 Hatchepsut as a man (after Naville, E., 1908, The Temple of Deir el-Bahari, 6, London, Plate CLVII)
5.2 Tree being transported from Punt (after Naville, E., 1898, The Temple of Deir el-Bahari, 3, London, Plate LXXIV)
5.3 House on stilts, Punt (after Naville, E., 1898, The Temple of Deir el-Bahari, 3, London, Plate LXIX)
5.4 The obese queen of Punt (after Naville, E., 1898, The Temple of Deir el-Bahari, 3, London, Plate LXIX)
5.5 Ape from Punt (after Naville, E., 1898, The Temple of Deir el-Bahari, 3, London, Plate LXXVI)
5.6 Tuthmosis III offers before the barque of Amen (after Naville, E., 1898, The Temple of Deir el-Bahari, 3, London, Plate LXXXII)

CHAPTER 6
6.1 Plan of the Speos Artemidos (after Fairman, H.W and Grdseloff, B., 1947, Texts of Hatshepsut and Sethos I inside Speos Artemidos, Journal of Egyptian Archaeology 33, Fig. I)
6.2 Reconstruction of the Amen temple at Karnak during the reign of Hatchepsut
6.3 Plan of Djeser-Djeseru
6.4 Hatchepsut being suckled by the goddess Hathor in the form of a cow (after Davis, T.M., ed., 1906, The Tomb of Hatshopsitu, London, Plate 58)
6.5 Hathor in her anthropoid form (after Sharpe, S., 1859, The History of Egypt, London, Fig. 101)

CHAPTER 7
7.1 The damaged figure of Senenmut from Tomb 353 (after Dorman, P.F, 1991, The Tombs of Senenmut, New York, Plate 81)
7.2 Sketch-portrait of Senenmut from the wall of Tomb 353
7.3 Hatchepsut and Senenmut? Crude graffito from a Deir el-Bahri tomb (after Manniche, L., 1977, Some Aspects of Ancient Egyptian Sexual Life, Acta Orientalia 38, Fig. 4)
7.4 Senenrnut worshipping at Djeser-Djeseru
7.5 Plan and reconstruction of the facade of Tomb 71 (based on Dorman, P.E, 1991, The Tombs of Senenmut, New York, Plates 4a and 4c)
7.6 Plan of Tomb 353 (after Dorman, P E, 1991, The Tombs of Senenmut, New York, Plate 51c)

CHAPTER 8
8.1 The cartouche of King Tuthmosis III
8.2 Tuthmosis III being suckled by the tree-goddess Isis (after Stevenson Smith, W., revised by W.K. Simpson, 1981, The Art and Architecture of Ancient Egypt, New Haven and London, Plate 257)
8.3 Tuthmosis III and his mother Isis, boating through the Underworld (after Stevenson Smith, W., revised by W.K. Simpson, 1981, The Art and Architecture of Ancient Egypt, New Haven and London, Plate 257)
8.4 The High Priestess of Amen-Re, Hatchepsut (after Budge, E.A.W, 1902, Egypt and her Asiatic Empire, London, Fig. 3)

Maps

Chronologies: The Tuthmoside Family Tree; Historical Events

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Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 15, 2014

    I am a high school sophomore and I chose to read this book that

    I am a high school sophomore and I chose to read this book that my teacher recommended for my research project. I found this book rather interesting to read because it contained plenty of information during Ancient Egypt. Throughout the book Joyce Tyldesley does not just focus on Hatchepsut, the main character of the story, the whole time she includes other figures that are related to Hatchepsut which I found to be far more interesting. Although sometimes Tyldesley would go into too much details about the figures which was difficult to read because they were irrelevant for the most part of the book. On the other hand the way Tyldesley describes and explains the lives of the ancient Egyptians really gave me a mental image of how they once lived. What this book did not really help me in was a full understanding of Hatchepsut and who she really was as a ruler, Tyldesley mainly focuses on the men in her life such as her husband and father. This book did help me expand my knowledge about Ancient Egypt but there are something’s which I would have wanted to know more about.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 11, 2013

    I am a high school sophomore who had to do a research project. M

    I am a high school sophomore who had to do a research project. My teacher recommended this book, and I'm
    glad I took her advice. This book was a great source of information for my project about the Egyptian pyramids.
    It informed me about the great Tuthmoside family of the 18th dynasty, in which Hatchepsut was a part of. Not only
    did it discuss this family, it also gave me an insight into the different dynasties and the Egyptians' way of life. I
    also learned the essential facts about their faith, culture, and traditions that helped me understand their theories
    and customs. I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book and learning about every aspect of the Egyptians as well as
    their great female pharaoh, Hatchepsut. At some points in the book, I feel as if the author went into too much
    detail about the history of Egypt. Also, I believe Joyce spent too much time discussing the reigns of
    Hatchepsut's father, brother/husband, and step-son. Her main focus should have been on Hatchepsut, but she
    did a fairly good job with the amount of information that was left from the Egyptians' destruction of Hatchepsut's
    existence. 

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 22, 2003

    IT was a good start but not the best

    I found the book to still be in lacking in who Hatshepsut was. It talked a great deal about the men in her life but I wanted to know more about her and her reign. It just could be the questions that have yet to be answered. I found the book useful in a background of how she came to rule and of some of the things she did but I wanted more.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 29, 2002

    Sensational

    From start to finish, this book was absolutely sensational. Joyce did her homework well. I don't think I would have done any better myself. Good researched work, with perfect, uncontradicted analysis and references. Good work!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 23, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 31, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

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