Hate That Cat

Hate That Cat

3.9 51
by Sharon Creech
     
 

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Jack

Room 204—Miss Stretchberry

February 25

Today the fat black cat up in the tree by the bus stop dropped a nut on my head
thunk
and when I yelled at it that fat black cat said
Murr-mee-urrr
in a nasty spiteful way.

I hate that cat.

This is the story of
Jack words sounds silence teacher and cat.

Overview

Jack

Room 204—Miss Stretchberry

February 25

Today the fat black cat up in the tree by the bus stop dropped a nut on my head
thunk
and when I yelled at it that fat black cat said
Murr-mee-urrr
in a nasty spiteful way.

I hate that cat.

This is the story of
Jack words sounds silence teacher and cat.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Stacey L. Hester
The honest, observant, and expressive Jack is sure about two things: he hates poetry and cats. His journey begins in Miss Stretchberry's classroom where he faces the challenge of expressing himself through poetry. He encounters problems along the way including his Uncle Bill, who, unlike Miss Stretchberry, insists that good poetry consists of long lines, symbolism and regular rhyme and meter. Jack tangles with the likes of alliteration, consonance, metaphors and onomatopoeia, but by the end of the school year he finds new meaning and purpose for such conventions and learns to appreciate the diverse beauties of both sound and silence. His evolving relationship with poetry mirrors his relationships with cats. Jack's initial aversion to felines transforms one Christmas morning when a tiny, mewing kitten crawls from underneath the wrappings scattered around the tree and straight into his heart. Author Sharon Creech invites emerging poets to commiserate with Jack as he learns to navigate the world of poetry and tempts seasoned poets to appreciate her crafty allusions and creative expression. Figurative language, poetic devices and visual word manipulation abound in this book of poetry. Reviewer: Stacey L. Hester
School Library Journal

Gr 3-7

Sharon Creech's free-verse novel (2008) continues the story of Jack, first introduced in Love That Dog (2001, both HarperCollins/Joanna Cotler Books). Jack is delighted that his teacher from the previous year, Miss Stretchberry, has also moved up a grade. For the second year in a row, Jack is encouraged to express his thoughts and feelings through a poetry journal. Miss Stretchberry introduces her class to the works of a variety of poets, and also introduces Jack to a kitten who captures his hear. As Jack explores rhythm and sound, he also wonders how poetry is experienced by those who cannot hear, such as his mother, who communicates her appreciation of Jack's poetry through sign language. The novel's combination of formats-journal and verse-is well narrated by Scott Wolf whose youthful diction captures the spirit of Jack's exuberant blank verse; his use of pauses and emphasis hints at the structure of the words on the page. The recording includes an appendix of some of the poems used in the class. This story will be enjoyed by reluctant readers for the accessible story line, and applauded by teachers for the embedded lessons in writing and poetry appreciation.-Misti Tidman, Boyd County Public Library, Ashland, KY

Kirkus Reviews
Newbery Medalist Creech continues the story of budding poet Jack in this sequel that, as is often the case with sequels, never quite captures the magic of the initial volume, 2001's Love That Dog. Jack is starting a new school year, moving up to the next grade along with his perceptive teacher, Miss Stretchberry. As in its predecessor, Jack's poems respond to well-known works studied in class and to Miss Stretchberry's insightful comments. She encourages Jack to stretch in his writing and to continue to examine buried feelings about his dog and, this year, about his mother as well. The titular cat that Jack dislikes is a mean neighborhood cat, but he changes his mind about felines when he gets a kitten as a Christmas present. The growth in Jack's writing is evident as the year progresses, and he learns more about the elements of poetry (though some of his poems and responses veer off a little too far into Englishmajorland). Teachers will welcome both Jack's poems and Creech's embedded writing lessons. (appendix, bibliography) (Fiction/poetry. 9-12)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780061430947
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
02/23/2010
Pages:
152
Sales rank:
48,274
Product dimensions:
5.10(w) x 7.50(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

Read an Excerpt

Hate That Cat
A Novel

Jack

Room 204—Miss Stretchberry

September 12

I hate that cat
like a dog hates a rat
I said I hate that cat
like a dog hates a rat

Hate to see it in the morning
hate to see that
F A T black cat.

Hate That Cat
A Novel
. Copyright © by Sharon Creech. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.

Meet the Author

Sharon Creech has written twenty books for young people and is published in over twenty languages. Her books have received awards in both the U.S. and abroad, including the Newbery Medal for Walk Two Moons, the Newbery Honor for The Wanderer, and Great Britain’s Carnegie Medal for Ruby Holler.

Before beginning her writing career, Sharon Creech taught English for fifteen years in England and Switzerland. She and her husband now live in Maine, “lured there by our grandchildren,” Creech says. “Moo was inspired by our mutual love of Maine and by our granddaughter’s involvement in a local 4-H program. We have all been enchanted with the charms of cows.”

Brief Biography

Hometown:
Pennington, New Jersey
Date of Birth:
July 29, 1945
Place of Birth:
Cleveland, Ohio
Education:
B.A., Hiram College, 1967; M.A., George Mason University, 1978

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Hate That Cat 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 52 reviews.
lrhunter More than 1 year ago
The entire story is written in poems, which makes it unique. Although written for children ages 9-11, readers of all ages will enjoy reading Jack's diary-like poems written to his teacher. The reader knows Jack has recently lost a pet and is still learning to cope. We also are aware that his mother has a disability, which he speaks of often. This book would be a good choice to show that poems do not have to be a certain length or rhyme. Other topics include pet death, new pets, and disabilities. This is a fast and enjoyable read. I was interested in Jack and the events of his life. He offered an interesting perspective on the day to day activities and events of a child growing up.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love this book its one of my favs.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
OkapiMA More than 1 year ago
Didn't know what to expect. The title caught my eye. Its technically a child's, Jack's, poetry journal...all his thoughts written in poetic form. Quite cute really. It does have depth though...you discover what cat he hates, how much he misses his dog, how irritating his uncle is, how he loves his new pet even though....(don't want to ruin) and why his mother seldom comes to school conferences or recitals. Endearing.
srwingo-89 More than 1 year ago
Hate That Cat By Sharon Creech follows the story of a young boy named Jack. Jack writes peoms, even if at first he doesnt want to. In fact Creech's book is written in all poems. Jack first write about his dog, Sky, who has passed away. We also learn that Jack does not like cats , exspecally the one around the neighborhood that attacked him. However Jack soon gets a kitten that he names Skitter McKitter. After a while Jack comes to love not only Skitter McKitter, but the other cat too. Creech's book is a great way to introduce poetry into any classroom. She uses the idea of mentor text to help jack, which can also be used in any classroom as a spring board to help students that have a diffcult time writing poems, like jack did, or who are stuck on how to start a poem. Hate That Cat is a fun easy book for students to read by themselves, with friends or family members.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
"Hate that Cat" is a very interesting book and unlike any book I have ever read. If I had to compare the book to any other it would be the "Diary of a..." books. However, to compare it to another book doesn't do it any justice. "Hate that Cat" is a bout a boy named Jack who writes a journal to his teachers. The book goes through the whole school year and starts with Jack upset that they have to learn about poems again this school year. Jack also explains that he hates cats and prefers dogs. By the end of this story Jack's opinion changes of cats and poetry. the reader also learns that Jack's father takes care of the family because his mother is deaf. Jack at first is ashamed of her but this to changes. This is a great story to bring into a second grade class or higher grade. This is a wonderful read aloud book for younger grades and a great independent read for older students.
kabatcke More than 1 year ago
Hate That Cate by Sharon Creech was very cute story. As I started to read it, I was a little confused by the way it was writeen. This book is written in a poetry style. The story revovles around a young child, Jack and how much he hates cats. He is writing different poems that Miss Stretchberry (his teacher) encourages to continue working on, to help him improve his writing. Within his poetry, Jack addresses many different ideas about cats and why he does not like them as well as why he can't understand why others do like cats. This story is fun and exciting to read, also easy to follow. If you are looking for a story that will keep your attention and wanting to read more, then Hate That Cat is the book. I think that this book is suitable for children around the ages of 7-11 years old.
masmith012 More than 1 year ago
Hate that Cat by Sharon Creech is unlike any book I have read. At first, I was very unsure about how the book would flow, and if it would be confusing, however, I continued reading and loved the book. Hate that Cat is a book that you won't want to put down. The book is written from the perspective of Jack as different journal entries. Jack writes about many things, such as: different famous poets and poems that they talk about in his class. Jack includes different literary elements including similes, metaphors, alliteration, and onomatopoeias. Jack also has an interesting way to describe things; one such is his mom. Jack's mom is deaf and he describes how she talks with her hand, but he never once says that she is deaf. This book is a wonderful book, one I encourage to be brought into the classroom, your class will enjoy it.
nmay More than 1 year ago
I think this is a great book from the perspective of a student teacher. I like books that are different then any other book I pick up. I like how this is written as a poem. There are not chapters in this book, there are just different journal entries. Some books are hard to follow when they are written in poem form, but this one flowed nicely. This book is about a boy named Jack who writes in his journal, Hate that cat about poetry and his life, and also everything that he learns in school. This would be a good book for a middle school student to sit down and enjoy.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book would be a great read for any English Teacher to share with their students! It's about a boy named Jack who writes poems based on other famous poems that his teacher shares with his class. The book mentions concepts such as, alliteration, simile, metaphor and onomatopoeia. As a student teacher I know i would love to use this book in my class someday when I do a unit on poetry. I also really enjoy that the author Sharon Creech has at the back of the book, the famouse poems that Jack makes reference to in the story. It ties the whole book together. This book is great for any poetry lover's collection!
Meatwood More than 1 year ago
Hate That Cat, by Sharon Creech is an entertaining introduction to poetry by well known writers. The book's main character, Jack, is taken on a journey of self discovery through his daily journal. He writes freely, paying minimal attention to line length, rhyme, and meter. Jack is skeptical at first, but through continuous writing, explores his thoughts about cats, dogs, and his deaf mother. The more he writes, the more things around him start to make sense. It is only because he does not want to betray his love for his dead dog, sky that he claims to hate cats. Throughout the school year, Jack develops his poetry skills using imagery, and starts to open up about his mother. The author uses text sparingly, which makes for a quick read for 3rd 5th graders. Students are able to read poems by well known artists such as Edgar Poe, T.S. Eliot, and William Carlos Williams, which are located in the back of the book. I highly recommend this book to all dog, cat, and poetry lovers.
jmaxfield More than 1 year ago
Hate That Cat by Sharon Creech is written in poem form. At first I thought it was going to be hard to read, because of the way it was written. Once I read the first couple of pages, it was just like reading any other book. Jack is the main characher of the book and carries on a conversation with his teacher through his writings. He comments of the lessons that his teacher has taught or read about in class. She covers several elements of poetry like: alliteration, onomatopoeia, assonance and methaphors. This book would be a great way to hook students into poetry and keep them interested.
kris-svsu More than 1 year ago
Jack hates cats, he prefers dogs! Hate that Cat by Sharon Creech is an excellent way to introduce poetry for young readers. This is journal of a young boy named Jack, who over comes some challenges in his life while learning about poetry. This journal uses a variety of poems, authors, and poetry vocabulary to introduce and deepen learner's knowledge and skill about poetry, while giving relatable experiences to expand the readers understanding. Throughout the journal the narrator uses examples of practice with a variety of poetry skills, while introducing examples from various poets. This is a very good book to use in the classroom or to give a reluctant poet learner for individual reading. I will add this book to my collection of useable works
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
What a great and different book for students to read. The way this book was set up was brilliant and an easy read. Jack goes through and talks about his loss of his pet and having to deal with getting a new one, despite the neighbors big black cat.He also talks about his mother and how she is deaf. He goes through and talks about the importance of metaphor, alliteration, onomatopoeia, and LARGE moments. I thought this book was awesome and interesting for students of young ages to read.
melmarie88 More than 1 year ago
Writing poems and reading about cats is Jack's least favorite thing in the world to do in the book Hate That Cat, by Sharon Creech. He is in Miss. Stetchberry's class and is constantly working on writing poetry. He feels he is no good at it and his Uncle Bill always seems to be criticizing his writing and telling him he needs to add more to it. He isn't fond of the fact that Uncle Bill says poetry must include symbols, metaphors, regular meter and must rhyme. Jack feels very strongly about his dislike for cats. He seems upset when the poems that he reads talk about them; he finds dogs to be much better companions as pets. At first, Jack is very leery and seems discouraged about his poems. He soon starts to feel more comfortable as he writes more and more. He discovers poetry in his everyday life. He grasps literary terms and discusses them throughout the story. He criticizes William Carlos Williams poems saying that they do not include very much alliteration, onomonapia, similes, or metaphors. Jack takes many different poems and rewrites them in his own way. He grows to find a love for poetry. He also learns that he really does like cats after his parents get him one for Christmas. He soon discovers that the mean black cat he hated so much really is not as bad as he thought, and saves his kitten Skitter McKitter after she was missing. This is a great book for students in third grade and up. Jack is a character that students could easily relate to. He struggles with writing poetry and finding his voice. His poems are humorous and fun to read. He grows and a writer and as a person in this story. In the beginning he didn't like cats, but after having more experience with them, he learned to love them. This can be helpful with encouraging students not to "judge a book by its cover," and to not judge right away. This book is great with explaining literary terms to elementary level students and provides wonderful examples of them. Overall, I greatly enjoyed this book and would use it in my classroom. Creech, Sharon. Hate That Cat. New York: Harper Collins Publishers. 2008. Print.
arstephe_svsu More than 1 year ago
Hate That Cat- by Sharon Creech As a student teacher, I enjoyed the way the book is set up. It is different from other novels with the way the author breaks the pages up like a diary, using poems. This novel does not consist of different chapters, instead she uses a creative technique of diary entries. In brief, it is about a young boy named Jack who is starting a new school year. His teacher is Miss Stretchberry, whom he had last year. He really likes the way Miss. Stretchberry teaches about poetry, unlike his Uncle Bill who is a college professor. He wishes his Uncle Bill would teach more along the lines of Miss. Stretchberry, instead of focusing on symbols, metaphors, and teaching people that poems have to rhyme. However, even though Jack brings up facts about his family, and his old dog Sky who recently died, this book is supposed to revolve around a neighborhood cat, "a mean cat, a crazy mean fat black cat" (Creech 6.) I would absolutely recommend this book for 3rd-6th graders. I believe children would enjoy this book for a number of reasons. To begin, even though it has close to 200 pages, it would not take a child longer than an hour or so to complete. It is the perfect book to keep them entertained if they have some time on their hands. Sharon Creech did a wonderful job as a narrator of a middle school student. Every line was believable and I did not question one part of the book. I like the fact that Creech introduced poems that were brought into Miss. Stretchberry's class. As these poems were mentioned throughout the book, and Jack gives his opinion about them; at the end of the book, all of the poems are presented to the reader. For example, Edgar Allan Poe, William Carlos Williams, Valerie Worth, and Christopher Myers were a few of the authors of poetry who are stated. I believe teachers could benefit from bringing this book into their classroom to introduce students to poetry. They will be able to teach them many concepts about different forms of poetry while giving their students practice with reading. Overall, great book!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is a wonderful story about a young boy named Jack. Jack is Mrs. Strechberry's classroom and she decides that they will begin a poetry lesson. Jack doesn't really understand why he needs to learn about poetry and doesn't really get it in general. He decides to talk to his Uncle Bill to get some help but that backfires on him and Uncle Bill just confuses him more by saying it has to rhyme and be in written in long sentences. The book comes in the form of a diary which is fun for children, they might be able to relate to it a bit easier. Jack loves his dog but one tragic day the dog dies. Jack finds it easy to begin writing poems about his dog in free verse, just the opposite of what his uncle said. Jack gets a cat for Christmas and he decides he doesn't like it at all. His feelings change though out the book when he decides to start to sign his poems to his deaf mother. This story is a great story to use in a classroom to show students that even though some people are different were all still very much the same. It would be a good introduction to a poetry unit and is easy to read, perfect for students in the 2nd-5th grade range.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Hate That Cat by Sharon Creech is novel written in verse that is narrated by the main character Jack. Everyday Jack writes in his journal about what is happening in school and at home. What Jack writes each day is what we read in the book. Jack is so excited his teacher, Ms. Stretchberry, has moved up a grade with him and is going to be his teacher for another year. Ms. Stretchberry teaches a lot about poetry and Jack really enjoys that. He feels he is not a good poet because everything he writes his Uncle Bill always says something is wrong with it. However, he uses poetry to explore his feelings. In this book Jack starts out hating cats and explains how he was waiting at the bus stop and heard a cat in the tree. He went up to save it and the cat attacked him. He decided he does not like BIG cats and dogs are way better. Jack gets a small black kitten under the Christmas tree. Does he like the cat?
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
As a student teacher candidate, I would definitely read use this book in the classroom. This book gives examples of poetry terms such as alliteration, onomatopoeia, simile, and metaphor. Students will like the way the narrator, Jack writes his poems. His poems are very short and to the point which I'm sure students will not only appreciate but will also enjoy the context of his poems. I would recommend buying a set of these books so that students can see the format Jack uses while he is writing his poems and the structure he uses in his poems. Overall I really enjoyed this book. I would definitely recommend this book to other teachers and anyone who loves poetry.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Hate That Cat, written by Sharon Creech is basically a journal of a young boy learning to write poetry. The main theme throughout the book is that most every poem involves a cat. In the beginning he has very rough poems and as the reader we see them develop throughout the book. He learns many lessons on which he comments, such as alliterations and onomatopoeias. The book is not really that interesting nor educational. The poems are not very good and the lessons on language are not very intensive. I do not think it is really a great book for either leisure or educational purposes.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
There were several things I liked in this book. I liked the setup of it and how it seemed to be the diary of a student who was in the process of learning about poems and poetry. I thought a lot of what was written could really have come from a child. Even though it is written in a journal format you can tell there are some interactions between the student and teacher and it's very fun seeing the students response. In the beginning I thought there wouldn't be much plot, but I was quite wrong. I also liked that all the poems mentioned in the book can be found at the end of the book. Overall I thought this book was very well written and definitely worth taking the time out of my day to read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Hate that Cat by Sharon Creech, Ages 8-12. Hate that Cat is written in journal form throughout the course of the school year by Jake, to his teacher. Jake moved up a grade and his teacher moved up with him too. Jake focuses on his dislike for a neighborhood big, fat cat and his dislike for the feline species in general throughout most of this book until he receives a black kitten for a Christmas present. The story is written in poetic stanzas and follows Jake as he learns about poetry and many poetic devices such as alliteration, onomatopoeia, and metaphors. This book would be an excellent compliment to a poetry unit for an elementary or intermediate school classroom. It is a great way to expose children to famous poets and their styles of writing, as there are many examples throughout the book.
ashleyh More than 1 year ago
HATE THAT CAT by Sharon Creech, Published by HarperCollins in 2001, is a great book that is amusing and one that children can relate to. This book is the sequel to another book called, Love that Dog! It is a poetic book about jack and how he is dealing with the fact that his dog died. His dog's name was sky and he loved his dog. His dog was being replaced by a mean icky cat, and he HATES THAT CAT!! Also mentioned in the book is Jack's Uncle Bill. Uncle Bill is argumentative and wanted Jack to write poems that had, elements of literature, yes its true but sad. Like ONOMATOPOEIA to make his poem POP! He also wants him to include rhythm and meter until he couldn't stop. In addition a few Awesome Alliterations would make his Poem Pretty, but Jack will not have this and it's such a pity. This book is a great way to get students to understand and start to use these words, because the character is using them in a entertaining, yet informative way. It is also an excellent choice because students can relate to it. They may have had to deal with their pet dying, or may hate cats and love dogs, or just the opposite! This book also incorporates Jack's feelings and lets him think out loud, About how he loved his dog Sky and sky would; Be so hyper and fun, Wagging his tail, Making him laugh, Playing ball with him, And giving him slobbery kisses. Not like cats who, Were boring, And plain, And creepy, And wanted to scratch you, With their Cazy, Cactus-like Cutting Claws! The fact that he includes his feelings may also make this book easily relatable to students, because they can understand his reasoning for things and may agree or disagree. Overall I would say that this book is a great book for students. I would gear this book at children ages 9-12, because they would benefit most from the vocabulary and style. I think this book would be a great addition to any classroom!
TE301 More than 1 year ago
Hate That Cat by Sharon Creech is a fun and entertaining novel written in diary entry format. It is a great way to get children interested in poetry. This sequel to Love That Dog shows students that poetry can take many different forms. The narrator, Jack, discusses in his daily diary, through poetry how he is learning to feel the poetry and he understands that it does not always have to make sense to other people. The person whom he is talking to in his diary of poetry is his teacher, Miss Stretchberry, who has followed him as his teacher to the next grade. He is happy about this because, according to Jack, this teacher understands his brain. Each day in his diary is a new poem and a new topic, although many topics are repeated such as his hatred for cats, love for dogs, and his family, including Uncle Bill. Uncle Bill, who apparently likes to argue, tells him that his poems need to rhyme and have longer lines. Jack expresses to Miss Stretchberry in his diary entries that he remembers her telling the class that that is not true. Throughout the novel, Jack becomes more aware of his writing and his work progresses which is fun for the reader to see. Poetry vocabulary is discussed quite a bit from a child's point of view. Funny words such as onomatopoeia alliteration are discussed just like a child would do. Jack makes fun of the silly words before he becomes serious and lets the reader know that these literary devices help to enrich a poem. He gives many examples of different literary devices including the two previously mentioned as well as symbols, metaphor and simile. This can be a great resource for teachers to use as an introduction to children's poetry. Hate That Cat shows that poetry can be about any topic, written in any form, and most importantly, FUN! This very visual and fast paced book allows students to get to know Jack and see how writing poetry can be fun even if you think you hate it.
Te301jw More than 1 year ago
A novel written in verse, Hate That Cat, by Sharon Creech has an original copyright date of 2008.A school age boy is the narrator of this book writing on poetry in a verse, dairy entry format. The general subject matter deals with school, poets, and his family. The point of view is universal because it could be for 5th graders or a high school student. For this reason I feel this book could be geared towards many different grade level curriculums. Throughout the book Jack, the narrator, mentions technical poetry terms, references famous poet's work, but at he same time takes the reader through an emotional experience with his family. Just as Jack tried forming poems like the famous poets did, you could have your students do the same thing. I feel a child reading this would be engaged and at the same time reading and learning about poetry. It's sometimes hard to get children engaged while reading poetry but by incorporating Hate that Cat into the lesson I am sure it would get the students attention. The cover is appealing to people because of the title and once they open it up they see a lot of blank space on the page. That is a bonus for students that are not fast readers or dislike riding which makes it another good reason to bring it into your classroom. I feel the intended audience is very board as mentioned earlier due to Jack not having an age assigned to him. Although the style is informal I feel it's very personal and as the story progress so do all the characters. Having a mother with special needs makes the story much more emotional. Opening children's eyes up to what it takes to have a parent in that position is important to see everyone has a different home life. But always remembering different isn't always bad or wrong. I would definitely recommend this book for students, teachers, or parents because it's an easy read but at the same time you are learning information on poetry. I feel that Hate That Cat would be an excellent book to read for someone who was interested in learning a little more about poetry or would like to learn why the title is Hate that Cat.