Hattie The Bad

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Overview

Hattie was bad-from frogs in the fridge, to paint everywhere, to the occasional sale of her little brother at the yard sale. Yes, Hattie was SO bad, no one was allowed to play with her. And let's face it: Being bad by yourself is no fun. So Hattie decides to become good. Hattie the Good cleans her room, goes to bed early, and is an angel at school. Now everyone is allowed to play with her-but no one wants to. After all, what fun is a girl SO good that she makes everyone else ...

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Overview

Hattie was bad-from frogs in the fridge, to paint everywhere, to the occasional sale of her little brother at the yard sale. Yes, Hattie was SO bad, no one was allowed to play with her. And let's face it: Being bad by yourself is no fun. So Hattie decides to become good. Hattie the Good cleans her room, goes to bed early, and is an angel at school. Now everyone is allowed to play with her-but no one wants to. After all, what fun is a girl SO good that she makes everyone else look bad? Hattie is in a fix. What's a good, bad little girl to do?

From the talent behind Bridget Fidget and the Most Perfect Pet! comes a hilarious, lovable little imp, who-like most kids-is both bad and good. Who can't relate?

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Editorial Reviews

Booklist
Hattie is a no-holds-barred heroine whose rambunctious spirit is well matched by the conversational narrative and splashy, riotous illustrations.
Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
Hattie is "really, REALLY bad"—amusingly, deliciously so, to the delight of young readers. No words describe how bad, but the illustrations make it perfectly clear. Hattie was a good little girl once, but she has realized that being good is no fun at all. And because she does exciting bad things that other kids love, their parents will not let them play with her. Hattie wants playmates, so she decides to be as good as she had been bad. The other children lose interest in her, though. So when she wins the contest as "the best-behaved child ever," it's just too much for her. Hattie the bad returns "(with just a teensy bit of good)" and "no one refuse[s] to play with her... ever again." Berger's very lively, cartoon-like colored drawings use lots of orange and black to enhance the emotional content of this lesson in values and show how nasty can be good. Hattie is an innocent-looking youngster whose facial expressions communicate clearly. The settings are minimal, but watch out for that orange paint! Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1—Hattie trumpets such naughtiness as tagging her brother in a yard sale, tying her father's car keys to a helium balloon, and surprising her mother with live frogs in the refrigerator. At first, her unruly behavior wins applause from her peers—until their parents put a stop to their playing together. Then, Hattie decides to be good—even winning a television competition to be "the best behaved child ever." But, a too-good-to-be-true Hattie is not her style either (no one wants to play with her). On the night of the televised award, she shows her true colors by yelling "UNDERPANTS!" and turning a somersault revealing her skull-and-crossbones panties, and finds that mixing bad behavior with a "teensy bit of good" suits her just fine. Cleverly portrayed, Hattie's mischievous actions will surely elicit giggles, and the details provide much to discover and discuss. Berger embellishes his expressive black-line drawings with bright colors, and his illustrations bring a well-considered pace to the story. An eye-catching dust jacket features Hattie, paint bucket and brush in hand, just finished scrawling "Hattie the Bad" in orange paint across the book cover.—Barbara Elleman, Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art, Amherst, MA
Publishers Weekly
In this riotous debut, Devlin adopts a deliciously conspiratorial, first-person voice as she introduces readers to a naughty little girl named Hattie: “When I say bad, I don't mean a forgot-to-clean-her-room, reading-comics-after-bedtime kind of bad.” No, Hattie scares her mother by putting frogs in the refrigerator and tries selling her little brother for 20 cents at a yard sale. Because “Hattie was always doing exciting bad things... other children thought she was great,” but their parents won't allow them to play with her. This prompts Hattie to become “just as good at being good as she had at being bad”--though, try as she might, she can't resist her true nature forever. Berger's zesty, orange-splashed illustrations hum with energy and comic hyperbole, in perfect synch with the text. When Hattie turns obnoxiously good, her world becomes awash in pink, and the text “she kept her room clean” appears on a neat stack of boxes in her pristine room. Sly details like these make this a romp worth reading time and again. Ages 3-5. (Apr.)
Kirkus Reviews
A theatrical girl with a penchant for being bad tries to be good in this wry exploration of the dynamics of behavior. As a little girl, Hattie had been "quite good" until she realized it involved doing boring things like eating mushy food and going to bed early. So Hattie turned bad, "really, really bad." Her exciting bad behavior makes her a star with other kids but unpopular with their parents, who tell their kids to avoid her. An outcast, the wily Hattie retaliates by becoming as good as she has been bad. Indeed, she's so good at being good, parents love her while their kids are fed up. So when she wins the "best-behaved child ever" competition, Hattie has the perfect response. Berger's lively cartoon-like illustrations highlight overly dramatic Hattie and flesh out her escapades in black outlines, bold colors and varying types and font sizes. When Hattie's bad, she splashes orange across the page, and when she's good, everything's primly pink. A true scion of Eloise, the shameless Hattie's so bad she's just great! (Picture book. 3-5)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780803734470
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
  • Publication date: 4/1/2010
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 977,290
  • Age range: 3 - 5 Years
  • Product dimensions: 9.60 (w) x 11.40 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Meet the Author

Jane Devlin lives in London, England.

Joe Berger lives in Bristol, England.

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