Haunted New Orleans: History & Hauntings of the Crescent City

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Overview

New Orleans—the Big Easy, the birthplace of jazz, home of Café du Monde and what some call the most haunted city in America. Beneath the indulgence and revelry of the Crescent City lies a long history of the dark and mysterious. From the famous “Queen of Voodoo,” Marie Laveau, who is said to haunt the site of her grave, to the wicked LaLauries, whose true natures were hidden behind elegance and the trappings of high society, New Orleans is filled with spirits of all kinds. Some of the ghosts in these stories have...
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Overview

New Orleans—the Big Easy, the birthplace of jazz, home of Café du Monde and what some call the most haunted city in America. Beneath the indulgence and revelry of the Crescent City lies a long history of the dark and mysterious. From the famous “Queen of Voodoo,” Marie Laveau, who is said to haunt the site of her grave, to the wicked LaLauries, whose true natures were hidden behind elegance and the trappings of high society, New Orleans is filled with spirits of all kinds. Some of the ghosts in these stories have sordid and scandalous histories, while others are friendly specters who simply can’t leave their beloved city behind. Join supernatural historian Troy Taylor as he takes readers beyond the French Quarter and shows a side of New Orleans never seen.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781596299443
  • Publisher: History Press, The
  • Publication date: 10/5/2010
  • Series: Haunted America Series
  • Pages: 128
  • Sales rank: 423,494
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 8.80 (h) x 0.30 (d)

Meet the Author

Troy Taylor
Troy Taylor is the author of more than seventy books on history, crime, mysteries and the supernatural in America. He was born and raised in Illinois and currently resides in an undisclosed location in Chicago.
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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 8, 2012

    I recently took a trip to New Orleans & bought this book. As

    I recently took a trip to New Orleans & bought this book. As I flipped through the text, I began to get the feeling that I had read this copy before. A quick check proved this to be the case. The author has lifted entire paragraphs from preexisting works:

    "Jules served as apprentice under his mother's tutelage for six years before she sent him to France where he served in the great kitchens of Paris, Strassburg and Marseilles. He returned to New Orleans and became chef of the famous Pickwick Club in 1887 before his mother summoned him to head the house of Antoine... Jules married Althea Roy, daughter of a planter in Youngsville in southwest Louisiana, and Marie Louise, the grand dame of the family, was born. A son, Roy Louis, was born in 1902..."
    -from Antoine's Restaurant's website

    "After the death of his father, Antoine's son, Jules served as apprentice under his mother for six years before traveling to France, where he worked in the finest kitchens of Paris and Marseilles. In 1887, he returned to New Orleans and became chef of the renowned Pickwick Club until his mother summoned him to master the kitchens at Antoine's. Jules later married Althea Roy, daughter of a planter from Youngsville in southwest Louisiana, and their son, Roy Louis, was born in 1902..."
    --From Haunted New Orleans page 123

    There have been only nominal changes to content or structure. Copying & pasting entire passages & changing a few words doesn't make it original. The plagiarism doesn't end there, unfortunately:

    "Rumored to be the 'House of the Rising Sun,' the Villa Convento is a Creole townhouse built in or around 1833. The land was purchased from the Ursulines nuns. The first owner was Jean Baptiste Poeyfarre, who commissioned the construction of the building. His widow, ten years later, sold the property and building to Octave Voorheis. Mr. Voorheis lost this purchase in the depression following the Civil War, approximately in 1872... On March 10, 1902, Pasquale Taromina purchased the property. The family lived here until February 1946."
    -from Hotel Villa Convento's website

    "This former Creole townhouse and bordello is rumored to be the original 'House of the Rising Sun', from the famous song. It was built about 1833 on land was purchased from the Ursulines nuns, and the first owner was Jean Baptiste Poeyfarre, who commissioned the actual construction. His widow sold the place ten years later to Octave Voorheis, who lost the property in the depression following the Civil War. It was purchased by Pasquale Taromina in 1902, and he owned it until his death in 1946."
    --from `Haunted New Orleans', page 114

    Mr. Taylor also took passages from print books:

    "In the early days burials were all in ground and were terrifying affairs. Caskets were lowered into gurgling pools of water and were sunk into pits of oozing mud. As often as not, the coffin would capsize as the water seeped within. Heavy rains or a storm would cast newly buried half-decomposed cadavers to the surface."
    --from Gumbo Ya Ya (published in 1945), page 337

    "Such conditions made funerals a somewhat terrifying affair. Caskets were often lowered into gurgling pools of water and oozing mud. As often as not, the coffin would capsize as the water began to leak in, causing newly buried half-decomposed cadavers to float to the surface of the grave..."
    --from Haunted New Orleans, page 57

    Someone needs to sit this writer down & explain how wrong this is. Save your money for writers who deserve it.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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