Have You Ever Seen a Duck in a Raincoat?

Overview

Have You Ever Seen a Duck in a Raincoat? compares human clothing, footwear and headgear with the equivalent animal adaptations. Have you ever seen a lobster in a helmet? No? That's because lobsters don't need helmets because they have a hard shell to protect their heads and bodies.The animal tic-tac-toe activity at the end of the book will provide hours of educational enjoyment. Each informational picture book in the Have You Ever Seen series uses lighthearted human-animal comparisons to teach primary-level ...
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Overview

Have You Ever Seen a Duck in a Raincoat? compares human clothing, footwear and headgear with the equivalent animal adaptations. Have you ever seen a lobster in a helmet? No? That's because lobsters don't need helmets because they have a hard shell to protect their heads and bodies.The animal tic-tac-toe activity at the end of the book will provide hours of educational enjoyment. Each informational picture book in the Have You Ever Seen series uses lighthearted human-animal comparisons to teach primary-level children about animals.
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Editorial Reviews

The Globe and Mail
Cheery acrylic illustrations play the preposterous game to the hilt.
Quill & Quire
... the book is as cute and fun as that duck in its bright yellow raincoat
From the Publisher
A great addition to storytime line-ups (for small groups – it’s relatively wee) and nonfiction shelves.

Cheery acrylic illustrations play the preposterous game to the hilt.

... the book is as cute and fun as that duck in its bright yellow raincoat

Children's Literature - Sara Lorimer
This interesting, short book is a good way to get children thinking about animals and how they survive in the wild. "Have you ever seen a whale in a parka? That's silly. Whales don't wear parkas," the book says, followed by a one-sentence explanation of why people wear parkas (or soccer cleats, or bike helmets) and how animals have their own built-in insulation (or claws, or shells). The full-color, full-page illustrations are goofy on the "Have you ever seen…?" pages, and informative on the "What do animals do?" pages. Comparing humans and animals will help children grasp the ideas, and the silly but educational take on things will make the biology lesson go down easily. The end has instructions for playing a game based on the ideas in the book. Reviewer: Sara Lorimer
Kirkus Reviews
What child won't find it hysterical to imagine a jackrabbit wearing shorts, a cheetah in cleats or a lobster with a helmet? These clever hooks draw children into learning how these animals adapt to live in their environments and serve as mnemonic devices to help them remember the information presented. People, for instance, wear raincoats to stay dry, but ducks use their beaks to spread oil on their feathers from a gland on their backs. Kaner makes her facts accessible to even the youngest listeners-repetition and humor beg for their participation, while the explanations are kept simple and succinct. Szuc's acrylic artwork matches the tone and purpose of each page exactly. Silly pages feature cartoonish animals, while the scientific pages offer illustrations with more detail and close-up views of the adaptation being explained. A table of contents and tic-tac-toe activity and game board round out the text. A great addition to storytime line-ups (for small groups-it's relatively wee) and nonfiction shelves. (Informational picture book. 4-7)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781554532469
  • Publisher: Kids Can Press, Limited
  • Publication date: 3/28/2009
  • Series: Have You Ever Seen Series
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 1,240,051
  • Age range: 4 - 7 Years
  • Lexile: AD480L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 7.00 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 0.95 (d)

Meet the Author

Etta Kaner is an elementary school teacher and writer for both children and educators. Her children's books have won numerous awards, including the Silver Birch Award, the Scientific American Young Readers Book Award and the Science in Society Book Award. She lives in Toronto, Ontario.

Illustrator Jeff Szuc lives and works in Toronto. He works mostly in acrylics and feels any day he gets to play with paint is a really good day. He is illustrator of the Have You Ever Seen series.

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