Have You Seen Marie?

( 4 )

Overview

The internationally acclaimed author of The House on Mango Street gives us a deeply moving tale of loss, grief, and healing: a lyrically told, richly illustrated fable for grown-ups about a woman’s search for a cat who goes missing in the wake of her mother’s death.

The word “orphan” might not seem to apply to a fifty-three-year-old woman. Yet this is exactly how Sandra feels as she finds herself motherless, alone like “a glove left behind at the bus station.” What just might ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (39) from $1.99   
  • New (11) from $10.26   
  • Used (28) from $1.99   
Have You Seen Marie?

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$9.99
BN.com price

Overview

The internationally acclaimed author of The House on Mango Street gives us a deeply moving tale of loss, grief, and healing: a lyrically told, richly illustrated fable for grown-ups about a woman’s search for a cat who goes missing in the wake of her mother’s death.

The word “orphan” might not seem to apply to a fifty-three-year-old woman. Yet this is exactly how Sandra feels as she finds herself motherless, alone like “a glove left behind at the bus station.” What just might save her is her search for someone else gone missing: Marie, the black-and-white cat of her friend, Roz, who ran off the day they arrived from Tacoma. As Sandra and Roz scour the streets of San Antonio, posting flyers and asking everywhere, “Have you seen Marie?” the pursuit of this one small creature takes on unexpected urgency and meaning. With full-color illustrations that bring this transformative quest to vivid life, Have You Seen Marie? showcases a beloved author’s storytelling magic, in a tale that reminds us how love, even when it goes astray, does not stay lost forever.

Read More Show Less
  • Have You Seen Marie?
    Have You Seen Marie?  

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“This picture book for adults explores the ways in which grief lays us low, but also can bring us out to discover the strength of the communities we belong to. When Roz comes to visit Sandra after Sandra’s mother passes away, she brings her cat, Marie. Marie, in the way of so many cats, disappears the day she arrives, and Roz is desperate to find her again. The two women make flyers and Sandra reluctantly leaves her home to help Roz canvas the neighborhood, along the way meeting with others who grieve their own losses. With colorful drawings, Hernández brings the community alive, while Cisneros writes her heroine’s way through the discovery that there is a way to emerge from sadness into memory. And yes, there is a happy ending.” —Kathy Ward, Juneau Empire
 
“In Have You Seen Marie?, we are invited into a look of the pain Cisneros’s experiences upon losing her mother. . . . This loss does not allow her to see tomorrow because she cannot remove herself from the remorse of today. During her grieving process, Cisneros receives company from her friend Roz who brings along her cat, Marie. As the two women are rejoined, they find themselves without Marie. The story takes on a new sense of urgency as the two friends take to the streets to find the missing cat. As the search for Marie ensues, we are introduced to the colorful experience and occupants of San Antonio.  Each of these introductions allows us to take part in the environment that exists to remind us that there is life all around us. . . . Cisneros’s gift of storytelling and Ester Hernández’s illustrations bring to life the story about death, grief, and the desire to move forward. This book is a wonderful gift to share with someone who is experiencing the pain of losing a loved one.” —Jasmine Colón, Modern Latina

“Award-winning Cisneros tells the story of her search for a runaway cat that parallels her journey through grief after the death of her mother. . . . This is a charmingly illustrated tale, rich in metaphor, and a solace to anyone who has felt the despair of losing someone dear.” —Diane Prokop, Portland Book Review 
 
“Warmly comforting . . . Cisneros has crafted a story that not only explores loss but also the journey back, creating a book that’s unique and uplifting. As Rosalind and the narrator search a beloved cat, Marie, they encounter a culturally rich and diverse community—each person with his or her own story and preoccupations, his or her own sadness. Each of these characters seems to understand that the search is about more than finding Marie. . . . Hernández’s illustrations are wonderfully detailed and capture the uniqueness of the neighborhood and the spirituality of the journey. . . . Cisneros and Hernández invite the reader to visually enjoy the story, to listen to the music of the words. In the afterword, Cisneros explores how she dealt with the death of her mother, and how the act of creation nourished her as she grieved.” —Matt Mendez, El Paso Times  

“A magical journey . . . A short, sweet, illustrated story about two friends searching for a lost cat. The women scour an eclectic neighborhood based on Cisneros’ own quarter of San Antonio, Texas, encountering a series of characters and small adventures . . . Cisneros has folded powerful themes into this seemingly simple fable: confronting and accepting the loss of a loved one, the importance of community, the presence of spirituality in our lives and the way that imagination and art can illuminate reality. . . . The inhabitants we meet in Cisneros’ story are equally eclectic, and many have suffered their own losses. . . . They come to life not only in Cisneros’ poetic nuggets of prose, but in Ester Hernández’s sweetly realistic color illustrations. The book glows with Cisneros’ affection for [her] neighbors. [She] hopes the book will comfort others dealing with loss.” —Jordan Levin, The Miami Herald

Have You Seen Marie? is the size of a lunchbox sandwich, but it offers lasting nourishment. The illustrated fable starts as a search for a friend’s missing cat, but quickly becomes a meditation on loss, a way for the main character, also named Sandra, to process her mother’s death. As Sandra and her friend Roz search San Antonio for Marie, questioning not just neighbors but also their pets and the neighborhood squirrels, Sandra goes on her own inner quest to make peace with her profound grief. Marie? is an orphan adventure tale for grown-ups with the soothing cadence of a children’s picture book. Like the best bedtime stories, it both honors the darkness around us and keeps the darkness at bay. . . . This book will surely be pressed into many bereft hands. Cisneros captures the experience of grief with moving and visceral clarity; lines like ‘Every day I woke up and felt like a glove left behind at the bus station’ take the reader straight into the heart of loss, while charming descriptions of San Antonio characters and the neighborhoods they inhabit keep us grounded in the world Cisneros knows so well. Hernández’s drawings fill in the blanks left by the vibrant but spare text . . . Sandra’s neighbors remind her she is part of a community that understands loss, that can support her through loss. This reminder is one of the greatest gifts of the book: We may feel like abandoned gloves in our grief, but when we share our stories with one another, we realize we’re in the same lost-and-found box together.” —Gayle Brandeis, San Francisco Chronicle 
 
“Cisneros is perhaps best-known for The House on Mango Street, a story about a young Latina who leaves behind her barrio for a chance at a better life and is considered a classic of Chicano literature. . . . Have You Seen Marie? [is] a tale about a woman’s search for a cat who goes missing in the wake of her mother’s death. It’s a fable for grieving grown-ups, [one] she hopes will be medicine for hearts broken from loss. . . . Artist Hernández represented the unique and colorful characters, all based on Cisneros’ neighbors. They make up the quirky King William district of San Antonio, Texas, where the story is based.” —Cindy Y. Rodriguez, CNN 
 
“In Have You Seen Marie?, the narrator searches for her lost cat in her neighborhood. But she’s not just looking for Marie, she’s looking a piece of herself. . . . The book’s weight comes as the narrator realizes that she also misses her mother, who passed away a few months earlier. Marie provides a unique glimpse into a quirky neighborhood and heartfelt look into grieving.” —The Hispanic Reader 
 
“A real-life bedtime story for grownups, a gently soul-stirring meditation on the universality of grief, and the healing power of community and nature. . . . Have You Seen Marie?, filled with Cisneros’ poetic words and Hernández’s vibrant illustrations, is also a love letter to the quirky neighborhood where Cisneros has lived for 20 years. . . . Charming.” —Agnes Torres Al-Shibibi, The Seattle Times

“Cisneros, perhaps best known for The House on Mango Street, is an author whose descriptive, lyrical prose and expressive treatment of the Chicano cultural experience has catapulted [her] to nearly unparalleled fame. Her new release, Have You Seen Marie?—expressively wrought and full of picturesque illustrations of San Antonio and its colorful characters by visual artist Ester Hernández—is at its heart a parable for adults, whose themes of death, mourning, and loss take on new meaning when presented within a simple tale about a cat gone astray. In the process of writing it, [Cisneros] found healing in the aftermath of her own mother’s passing.” —Nina Terrero, NBC Latino

“Best-selling Cisneros chronicles a search for a runaway cat that turns into a way to work through grief and discover community. . . . The deliberately informal, rough-edged illustrations give a nice sense of Cisneros’ multicultural, bohemian neighborhood . . . [T]his warmhearted tale offers comfort to anyone coping with the loss of a loved one.” —Kirkus

Kirkus Reviews
Best-selling Cisneros (Caramelo, 2002, etc.) chronicles a search for a runaway cat that turns into a way to work through grief and discover community. When Rosalind arrives in San Antonio after a three-day drive from Washington state, her cat, Marie, promptly takes off. "Marie had cried the whole way," says the narrator. "I felt like crying and taking off too. My mother had died a few months before." You can hardly call this fiction, since Cisneros tells us in the afterword that she wrote it in the wake of her mother's death, that "the real Marie eluded capture for over a week," and that the illustrations by San Francisco-based artist Hernández are portraits of Cisneros' actual neighbors in San Antonio. Indeed, the tang of real life gives some needed grit to a rather anodyne account. As the narrator and Rosalind canvass the neighborhood in search of Marie, they encounter well-meaning folks who want to help but are preoccupied with their own lives. "We can do a river search on horseback," says one neighbor. "But my kid is coming over this weekend. Can you wait till next week?" A "jogger mom" pushing a runner's baby carriage doesn't even wait to hear their plea, and other people are sympathetic but wrapped up in their own pain: One lost her mother and brother within a year; another has a sister battling cancer. These glimpses of selfishness and sorrow make up for some overly whimsical moments when the seekers question squirrels, dogs and cats and imagine their responses. The deliberately informal, rough-edged illustrations give a nice sense of Cisneros' multicultural, bohemian neighborhood, and only die-hard cynics would begrudge the author her sweet but predictable culminating scene in which the narrator finds solace in a sense of unity with the natural world. Neither groundbreaking nor especially penetrating, this warmhearted tale offers comfort to anyone coping with the loss of a loved one.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780307597946
  • Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 10/2/2012
  • Pages: 112
  • Sales rank: 1,189,654
  • Product dimensions: 5.96 (w) x 6.62 (h) x 0.66 (d)

Meet the Author

Sandra Cisneros

Sandra Cisneros is the author of two highly celebrated novels, The House on Mango Street and Caramelo. Her awards include National Endowment for the Arts Fellowships, the Lannan Literary Award, the American Book Award, and a MacArthur Fellowship. Other books include the story collection Woman Hollering Creek; two books of poetry; and two books of children's literature. Her work has been translated into more than twenty languages. Cisneros is the founder of the Alfredo Cisneros Del Moral and Macondo Foundations, which serve creative writers.

Ester Hernández is an internationally acclaimed visual artist whose work is in the permanent collections of the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the Library of Congress, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and the Museo Casa Estudio Diego Rivera y Frida Kahlo in Mexico City. She lives in San Francisco.

Biography

Sandra Cisneros' first novel, The House on Mango Street, brought an entirely new voice to American literature, describing the experience of narrator Esperanza Cordero, a Mexican American girl living a hardscrabble existence in Chicago. As Bebe Moore Campbell put it, in the New York Times Book Review: "She is not only a gifted writer, but an absolutely essential one."

The book bore the author's powerful descriptive talents: Comparing her house on Mango Street with the "real house" her parents had promised her, Esperanza notes, "The house on Mango street is not the way they told it at all. It's small and red with tight steps in front and windows so small you'd think they were holding their breath."

Cisneros, who grew up in Chicago as the only daughter in a family of seven children, attended college on scholarship and was an ethnic anomaly as a graduate student at University of Iowa's renowned Writers' Workshop. There is a lyric quality to Cisneros' work that makes sense, given her alternate life as a poet who has published several volumes of poetry (two, 1980's Bad Boys and 1985's The Rodrigo Poems, are no longer in print).

As a poet, Cisneros has a staccato, highly evocative style. From "A Few Items to Consider," for example: "First there is the scent of barley/to remember. Barley and rain./The smooth terrain to recollect and savor./Unforgiving whiteness of the room./Ambiguity of linen. Purity./Mute and still as photographs on the moon." Cisneros suffuses her poetry and fiction with healthy dose of Spanish and a feminine sensibility, female narrators who remember everything and for whom no detail or sensation is too small. Paragraphs are often punctuated by lists and five-word snapshots. As Cisneros herself has said, she is a miniaturist.

Her poetry and a 1991 collection of stories, Woman Hollering Creek, would have to tide fans over until the long-awaited release of her second novel, 2002's Caramelo. Like her first novel, the story is narrated by a Mexican-American girl; but the scope is a broader one, covering generations of a family as viewed through a cherished caramelo rebozo, or striped traditional shawl, which has been passed down through generations to the book's heroine.

Caramelo has a comical and occasionally unconventional spirit to it, as when one of the characters in the story breaks in to complain about how she is being portrayed. The novel began as an exploration of her own family, and the connection to Cisneros' own life is evident. Here as in other work, Cisneros fills in the gaps between Mexico and the U.S., personal myth and reality.

Read More Show Less
    1. Hometown:
      San Antonio, Texas
    1. Date of Birth:
      December 20, 1954
    2. Place of Birth:
      Chicago, Illinois
    1. Education:
      B.A., Loyola University, 1976; M.F.A., University of Iowa Writers' Workshop, 1978

Reading Group Guide

The questions, discussion topics, and reading list that follow are intended to enhance your all-ages reading group’s discussion of Have You Seen Marie?, Sandra Cisneros’s simple, magical story of love, loss, and recovery.

FAMILY ACTIVITIES
   • Read the book aloud with your family and show the pictures to younger members of the family who are not yet able to read.
   • As a group, write and illustrate a story related to your own loss.
   • Plan a small memorial celebration just for your family. Share stories about your loved one—funny, sad, wistful—and do something you enjoyed doing together.
   • Gather mementos that remind you of your lost loved one and create a memory box or altar together. Display it in a prominent place in your home.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 2.5
( 4 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 3, 2012

    Where is the rest of the book?

    Really? 36 pages? There should be a warning.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 27, 2012

    moderately recommended

    This is a book for all ages. If you've ever lost loved one, this book will mirror your feelings and then give insight into how you can come to terms with that loss and have hope. Simple, yet lovely illustrations. It's important to read the introduction and the author's afterward! Every time I read the book, something else pops out. It's whimsical, yet touching and moving.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 20, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 22, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)