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Haveli [NOOK Book]

Overview

The world of Newbery Honor book Shabanu is vividly re-created in this novel of a young Pakistani woman's heartbreaking struggle against the tyranny of custom and ancient law. Shabanu, now a mother at 18, faces daily challenges to her position in her husband's household, even as she plans for her young daughter's education and uncertain future. Then, during a visit to the ...
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Haveli

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Overview

The world of Newbery Honor book Shabanu is vividly re-created in this novel of a young Pakistani woman's heartbreaking struggle against the tyranny of custom and ancient law. Shabanu, now a mother at 18, faces daily challenges to her position in her husband's household, even as she plans for her young daughter's education and uncertain future. Then, during a visit to the haveli, their home in the city of Lahore, Shabanu falls in love with Omar, in spite of traditions that forbid their union.


From the Paperback edition.

Having relented to the ways of her people in Pakistan and married the rich older man to whom she was pledged against her will, Shabanu is now the victim of his family's blood feud and the malice of his other wives. Sequel to "Shabanu, Daughter of the Wind."

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
In a starred review, PW praised the ``eloquent, unpretentious language'' and ``intoxicating blend of heart-pounding adventure and social issues'' of this sequel to Shabanu. Ages 12-up. (June)
Publishers Weekly
In a starred review, PW praised the "eloquent, unpretentious language" and "intoxicating blend of heart-pounding adventure and social issues" of this sequel to Shabanu. Ages 12-up. (Jan.) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature - Susie Wilde
Haveli shows us the Pakistan of the upper class and the social constraints that bind the women. It is a tale of a woman's survival against incredible odds. According to the author, every story, every character, every detail is based on real things that happened to real people. Staples wrote her books to push aside the myths that exist in the West about Islamic culture and to expose the richness underneath. There is a haunting quality that invites women of all ages to think about the value systems of different cultures. Due to the material that is sometimes sexual and complex, the book is recommended for mature young adult readers. School Library Journal Best Book.
Ilene Cooper
"Shabanu": "Daughter of the Wind" (1989), with its wholly realized characters and its glimpses into another culture, had a presence not easily found in young adult books. It is often difficult for a sequel to generate the same excitement evoked by a first novel from a talented, fresh voice, but that is not the case here. "Haveli" will hold readers with the same rapt attention as its predecessors, and their involvement with the young Pakistani woman, Shabanu, her friends, and family will linger. The story picks up five years later. Shabanu, given in marriage to an elderly, powerful man, has now presented him a daughter, Mumtaz, who means everything to her mother. Though her husband adores Shabanu, he has neither the time nor the inclination to protect her from the various cruelties and intrigues that occur in a household where there are three cultured senior wives who look down on Shabanu as a desert interloper. To protect her daughter, Shabanu is constantly making plans for their safety should her husband die, but when Shabanu becomes involved in a plan to save her only friend from a disastrous marriage and begins having feelings for her husband's nephew, her situation becomes increasingly perilous. Staples brews a potent mix here: the issue of a woman's role in a traditional society, page-turning intrigue, tough women characters, and a fluidity of writing that blends it all together. Staples has some very strong things to say about the lack of power some women have over their own lives, but the reader never hears preaching. Rather, as in the best stories, the message comes through the characters, their anguish and their triumphs.
From the Publisher
“Again, Staples imbues Shabanu and her beautiful, brutally repressive world with a splendid reality that transcends the words on the page. Admirers of the intelligent and courageous Shabanu will thirst for more.”—Starred, Kirkus Reviews

“Engrossing . . . a swiftly moving adventure story, set in modern Pakistan.”—School Library Journal, Starred

“Staples brews a potent mix here. . . . Haveli will hold readers with rapt attention.”—Booklist, Starred

“Staples’s portrayal of Pakistan is remarkably even-handed: she acknowledges the society’s inequities while celebrating its beauty and warmth. Intoxicating.”—Publishers Weekly, Starred

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780375985881
  • Publisher: Random House Children's Books
  • Publication date: 3/9/2011
  • Sold by: Random House
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 214,261
  • Age range: 12 years
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Suzanne grew up in Pennsylvania, and was a liberal arts major in college.  After graduation, she had various jobs, all having something to do with writing and research.  Eventually, she landed in Hong Kong, where she became a reporter for United Press International.  For six years, Suzanne lived and worked in China, and in 1979, UPI offered Suzanne her own bureau in South Asia.  Several extraordinary events happened during her tenure there, including the taking of American hostages in Iran, and the Civil War in Afghanistan.  Suzanne also traveled extensively with Indira Gandhi during this time.  In 1985, Suzanne went to Pakistan to conduct a study on poor rural woman. It was during this time that she was inspired to write her first children's book, Shabanu: Daughter of the Wind .  A sequel to Shabanu , Haveli , soon followed.

Currently, Suzanne Fisher Staples lives with her husband, Wayne Harley, in Mount Dora, Florida, where she continues to write.  


From the Paperback edition.
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Table of Contents

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 45 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(31)

4 Star

(6)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(5)

1 Star

(1)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 45 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 23, 2010

    It is the continuation of the story of Shabanu but could be read alone.

    Very emotional as Shabanu makes some difficult decisions. The story has easy linkage from the tribal desert to the decisions made every day by mothers and families everywhere in difficult circumstances.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 11, 2008

    I Agree

    I agree with the previous reviewer. Sure, things are different there NOW, but this was not meant to be NOW. I hadn't thought it was taking place in modern times until I read some of the reviews. I assumed it was at least like fifty years ago or maybe more. Anyway, I thought it was a wonderful story and recommend it to almost anyone.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 13, 2008

    Correction

    For the 2 previous reviewers: Its not only my opinion but also the other EDUCATED people and Muslims who believe in what I believe in. I don't know about anyone else, but i don't just believe in things without having solid proof. I have been to Pakistan about 3 times in the past 12 years. I have visited deserts and modern places. It isn't/wasn't so illiterate up there. I have studied religions and I know them very well. I should know my religion 'Islam' the most. From that, i say that Ms. staples has shown some contents that would make the so called 'westernized world' think as though islam is an illiterate religion. i believe that islam is a faith. not a religion. It's the most organized and the most peaceful religion. In islam, every angle and way of life is taught from islamic point of view. People probably thought that the men today like rahim shah marry 4 times. which is not true. because in today's world there is no need for a man to marry 4 times. And today's women aren't that peaceful, to be able to accept another women living with their husband. 4 Marriages were allowed back then only to help the helpless women.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 24, 2008

    Not Staples's Misinterpretation, but YOURS

    I understand that you say that Suzanne Fisher Staples has misinterpreted the surroundings in Pakistan? You say that now women are more free? Well, you are correct. Nowadays women ARE more free, but this book wasn't written in this, our current, time period. It takes place some time ago. Also, this book was written over 10 years ago. Did she have that much technology to go searching for information back then? No. It was all library and books back then -- not convenient, don't you think? Why don't you try putting yourself in that person's shoes before you go of critisizing others now would you? How SHALLOW.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 2, 2007

    Don't always believe in things u read without having evidence

    I have read Shabanu and I did not like the way Ms. Fisher staples described the life in Pakistan even though it does happen in some places like deserts. In Islam, a woman has a right to choose or decide whether she will marry a person chosen by her family. Fisher staples has not only descibed my culture in a bad way but she has also described Islam in a wrong way (like a strict religion). I totally agree with Tien Nguyen and the reviewer fron Vassar College. I STRONGLY agree with sammy2052000. So the next time u see a muslim taking time out of his/her day and praying 5 times a day or a woman wearing a hijab on a hot sunny day, don't feel bad for them or have any mercy on them because they are doing what they have to and following their religion. Islam gives everyone his/her rights including woman. anyways this book was an ok story.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 21, 2007

    A Distorted Story

    A young woman Shabanu becomes the fourth wife of a prestigious landowner in Pakistan, a man old enough to be her grandfather. In the next five years, she has a daughter Mumtaz, whom she is forced to raise in a household of jealous wives. The story may already seem depressing, but Shabanu is quite content with her married life. Aside from the fact that she is the youngest wife and must deal with the other wives¿ gossip, her story is not exactly a Cinderella story. The author, Suzanne Fisher Staples has not researched well on Pakistani traditions to write this novel. From reading this novel, one would get the idea that male domination is popular in families, arranged marriages are necessary, and that Muslim women have no rights. Staples only shows one part of Pakistan, the villages where most people are illiterate and live as nomads in the desert. In this area, only families of landowners are wealthy, but only a few women in these families are actually literate. The novel portrays a misinterpretation of the role of women in Pakistani traditions, as well as in Islam. In reality, not all of Pakistan is imprisoned in old traditions. Women do have a voice in the nation and a significant number are well-educated. Arranged marriages are common in this culture, but it¿s hardly something forceful. Westerners have a negative view on arranged marriages, that it is something that must be abolished in the world. Women in Pakistan have the choice to agree or disagree to marry the husband chosen by their families. Pakistanis do not make a big deal about the issue because it really is not a problem for them. In the novel, the women of the Haveli are unintelligent, shallow, and argumentative about trivial things. The jealousy and bitterness of the wives ruin the image of the real culture. Unlike the novel, few men in Pakistan still follow the tradition of marrying more than one wife. Since it is almost impossible to treat each wife equally, most men marry only one woman. Although prejudiced truths are present in the story, Haveli is a book difficult to put down. For Americans, it is interesting to read about the exotic culture of the other side of the world. But it is unsettling for Pakistani-Americans and Muslim-Americans to read something that is no longer true in the present day. The author has made a major mistake in not clarifying that the cultural and religious ideas in the novel are different from what they are today.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 3, 2006

    Unbelievable

    It tells the second part to the first book, but the ending was so... horrid. Usually I'm escatic -sp- to read sequels and the like, and I wanted to know what happens, but the ending just leaves you hanging a little bit. I look at it as a romeo and juliet ending, except twisted. If you want to read it, fine, but I don't recommend it. I'd rather wonder than know now.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 22, 2005

    Awsome book

    I loved this book very much ! I wonder if Shabanu will get Omar...? Really, there should be a sequel !

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 14, 2005

    This book is amazing!

    I loved this book soo much that i read it every year. If you havent read Shabanu the 1st book then its advised you read it b/c this is the seaqul. I only wish Suzanne Fisher Staples could write a third book and make that a winner too. If u havent read this it is very reconmended.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 28, 2005

    I want to know what happens!!!!!

    I really enjoyed reading these two books. I just want to know what Shabanu's life is going to end up as. There's so many questions that could be answered if there were a third book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 16, 2004

    This book is great, I want another!

    I really enjoyed this book and Shabanu. I still want to know if she ends up with Omar. I have read other books by this author and I enjoy those too. I REALY WANT ANOTHER SEQUEL TO THIS BOOK! !

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 2, 2004

    Strong cultural understandings

    I absolutely love this book!!! Although I feel so sad at the end, but it doesn't mean the book is not good though! I absolutely fall in love with Shabanu, Omar, little Mumtaz, Selma, and auntie Sharma! By reading this book, I really appreciate the cultures and understand the harships the the Pakistan people have to go through everyday! They are so strong, I really admire that. Suzanne Fisher Staples' style is really something. I really hope there's going to be a continuation!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2004

    Love your books

    I fell in love with both books. Shabanu was the first book I finished in 2 days. I hope there will be a continue to this story.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 26, 2004

    An enriching, exciting, and honest adventure!

    I first read Shabanu in the 5th grade, then Haveli followed by Shiva's Fire as soon as I could get my hands on them. That was almost a decade ago. Although I have now left the young-adult section of the library and have invested in classical literature, I'm still anxious to find out what will happen next with Shabanu! I know these stories will be interesting to any young girl, bookish, or not. They combine life changes, adventure, suspense, colorful descriptions, emotion, romance, and insight into an elusive culture. Everything to keep a young girl interested and excited about reading. The only complaint possible is that the sequel to Haveli has been so long in coming. I'm an adult now and I still want to know if Omar will ever find Shabanu. The suspense lasts through decades!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 3, 2003

    Awesome!

    I read Shabanu because i needed a book to read in school, so i just picked one. Now i'm glad i picked that and i just finished Haveli. I loved it. It was so susspensful. I really want a third book to come out. I am dying to find out what happens next whith Shabanu's life.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 28, 2003

    WHAT U THINK IS THE TRUTH IS SOMETIMES FALSE

    from my religious perspective i truly disagreed with the comment that Suzane made when she claims that islamic rules are based on ancient times. i think she should keep that comment to herself. a true muslim follows his/her religion regardless of these new insights of the so-called ' modernized life' . u see, unlike christianity, we do not have new testament for our one and only HOLY QUR'AN. one has the right to follow or disregard this religion - with that comes a torment in the afterlife. so when u see a muslim following their faith don't have sympathy for them, instead respect them. peace

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 25, 2003

    Tear- jerker

    I loved this book and Shabanu and they both made me feel for the characters. I cried at the end of Haveli and cherished Auntie Sharma, Shabanu, and Mumtaz. I hope another book comes out sealing the fate of dear Shabanu, Omar, and Mumtaz.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 11, 2003

    Sequel

    I loved this book and hope that another sequel to it will come out...it makes u want to keep turning the pages and find out what will happen next. It was a great book and a favorite, just like it's first half...shahbanu.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 29, 2002

    ~BREATHTAKING~

    THE BOOK SHABANU IS ONE OF MY ALL TIME FAVORITES. I WAS REALLY INTERESTED AND CAPTAVATED BY THIS BOOK SINCE I MYSELF AM A MUSLIM GIRL. I BELIEVE SOME OF THE STUFF SUZANNE WROTE ABOUT MUSLIM LIFE WAS UNTRUE. EVEN THOUGH SHE HAS BEEN TO PAKISTAN AND HAS LIVED IN A VILLIAGE WITH A MUSLIM FAMILY, WE MUSLIMS AREN'T AS ECCENTRIC AS SHE SAYS WE ARE. I AM NOT GIVING THIS BOOK BAD RATINGS BECAUSE I REALLY ENJOYED THE THEME OF THIS NOVEL. I HAVEN'T READ HAVELI YET BUT AM LOOKING FORWARD TO IT. MRS. FISHER I WOULD REALLY APPRECIATE A RESPONSE FROM YOU. THANKS

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 15, 2002

    ~Awesome~

    This book is sooo good. I read Shabanu in my English class and really got into it. Haveli is even better. You should really read it. I think it would be cool if there was a sequel to Haveli to

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