Haydn: Missa Cellensis

Haydn: Missa Cellensis

by Jos van Immerseel
     
 

Haydn's "Missa Cellensis" (the title refers to the town of Mariazell in the region of Styria, for which the mass was composed) is among the most distinctive of his early compositions, and one that succeeds entirely on its own terms rather than pointing toward later developments in his style. Furthermore, if it had direct models, they haven't yet surfaced. Perhaps it…  See more details below

Overview

Haydn's "Missa Cellensis" (the title refers to the town of Mariazell in the region of Styria, for which the mass was composed) is among the most distinctive of his early compositions, and one that succeeds entirely on its own terms rather than pointing toward later developments in his style. Furthermore, if it had direct models, they haven't yet surfaced. Perhaps it seems especially fresh in this magnficent performance by the historical-performance orchestra and chorus Anima Eterna and Belgian conductor Jos van Immerseel. The work, which breaks up the text into small sections, reveals a personal piety absent from the abstract structures and rather formal quality of Haydn's big late masses. A close stylistic comparison would be Mozart's "Coronation Mass, K. 317," and indeed there are passages that make you wonder whether Mozart knew Haydn's work. Haydn's soprano soloist seems to emerge, strikingly, out of the choir's opening phrases with the word "Credo" (I believe), while Mozart at the end of the Credo has the entire choir repeat the phrase "Credo in unum Deum." In this performance, recorded live at Dresden's Frauenkirche, Haydn's music in many places takes on a warmth that makes one think of Brahms' "Requiem." Immerseel captures the work's emotional range, setting angelic solos against big concluding contrapuntal passages in the Gloria and Credo (and, unusually, the final Dona nobis pacem) that come to life with period brass instruments. The Incarnatus and Crucifixus are given long, meandering operatic solos, as if a tragic story were being told in great detail. Immerseel's notes in the booklet explore the roots of Haydn's setting in the traditions of textual rhetoric, and he lists the rhetorical idea underlying each movement ("Qui tollis -- lamentation and compassion in harmony"). One may be a bit flummoxed by this device, but the musical results fully justify it. The live sound from the Carus label is superb, and for many listeners this recording will set a new standard for a work that has been particularly reluctant to reveal its secrets in performances using modern instruments.

Read More

Product Details

Release Date:
06/09/2009
Label:
Carus
UPC:
0409350832475
catalogNumber:
83247
Rank:
174239

Related Subjects

Tracks

  1. Missa Cellensis, for soloists, chorus, organ & orchestra in C major ("Cantata Mass"), H. 22/5  - Franz Joseph Haydn  -  Anima Eterna Orchestra  - Jos van Immerseel  - Harry van der Kamp  - Markus Schafer  - Marianne Beate Kielland  - Lydia Teuscher  -  Anima Eterna Chorus

Read More

Album Credits

Read More

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >