Hazan Family Favorites: Beloved Italian Recipes [NOOK Book]

Overview

As a child in America, Giuliano Hazan’s mother, Marcella, packed him meatballs with potatoes and peas, veal stew with mushrooms, and other homemade dishes for lunch—dishes that in no way resembled the peanut butter sandwiches his classmates enjoyed. And so began his appreciation of great food. Hazan Family Favorites celebrates delicious recipes from the Hazan family, prepared just as Giuliano prepares them for his own family today.  Here are 85 recipes for every course in the Italian meal, including ...
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Hazan Family Favorites: Beloved Italian Recipes

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Overview

As a child in America, Giuliano Hazan’s mother, Marcella, packed him meatballs with potatoes and peas, veal stew with mushrooms, and other homemade dishes for lunch—dishes that in no way resembled the peanut butter sandwiches his classmates enjoyed. And so began his appreciation of great food. Hazan Family Favorites celebrates delicious recipes from the Hazan family, prepared just as Giuliano prepares them for his own family today.  Here are 85 recipes for every course in the Italian meal, including Appetizers, Soups, Pastas and Rice, Meats and Seafood, and Sides and Desserts. With recipes from Swiss Chard Tortelloni to Strawberry Gelato and everything in between, Hazan Family Favorites offers an intimate look at this iconic family and their most beloved recipes.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781453286333
  • Publisher: Abrams, Harry N., Inc.
  • Publication date: 10/23/2012
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 176
  • Sales rank: 701,881
  • File size: 19 MB
  • Note: This product may take a few minutes to download.

Meet the Author

Giuliano Hazan
Giuliano Hazan is the son of famed Italian cookbook writer Marcella Hazan. He runs a cooking school in Verona, Italy, with his wife and won the International Association of Culinary Professionals award for Cooking Teacher of the Year in 2007. He is a contributor to Cooking Light magazine and author of The Classic Pasta Cookbook, Every Night Italian, and How to Cook Italian.

Giuliano Hazan is the son of famed Italian cookbook writer Marcella Hazan. He runs a cooking school in Verona, Italy, with his wife and won the International Association of Culinary Professionals award for Cooking Teacher of the Year in 2007. He is a contributor to Cooking Light magazine and author of The Classic Pasta Cookbook, Every Night Italian, and How to Cook Italian.
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Read an Excerpt

Hazan Family Favorites

Beloved Italian Recipes


By Giuliano Hazan, Joseph De Leo, Natalie Kaire

ABRAMS

Copyright © 2012 Giuliano Hazan
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-4532-8633-3



CHAPTER 1

Appetizers, Salads, and Side Dishes

The classic Italian meal consists of several courses, none of which is considered a main course. A primo, or first course, can be a pasta, risotto, or soup. It is followed by a secondo, a second course that usually consists of meat, chicken, or fish, often accompanied by a vegetable. The secondo is followed by a salad, and then by fruit or dessert. A simple green salad is a part of almost every one of our family meals, and we like to serve it at the end as a refreshing palate cleanser. Some salads, such as the Tuna, Bean, and Red Onion Salad in this chapter (see page 34), can also be a light meal or an appetizer. There's also a "Russian" salad here (see page 30), a typical holiday dish that has nothing to do with Russia except for the fact that it has beets in it; I remember my parents would almost always make it to celebrate the New Year.

When we are in the States, we miss the pizza from our favorite pizzerie in Italy, so we sometimes make a home-style baker's pizza that does not require a professional wood- burning pizza oven. Our kids love to participate in making it; I'll never forget a deep-blue pizza our daughter Gabriella once made by mixing food coloring into the dough. For one of our girls' birthdays, we threw a pizza party. I prepared the dough the day before, giving it time to rest. The day of the party, we put out a variety of toppings and everyone made their own pizza.


Pizza

Time from start to finish: 9 hours

Serves 4
¼ cup lukewarm water
1 package active dry yeast (¼ ounce)
1 teaspoon sugar
4¼ cups all-purpose flour
1 cup plus 2 tablespoons cool (not ice) water
1 tablespoon plus 2 teaspoons salt
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
Topping of your choice

1. To make the starter, mix the lukewarm water, yeast, and sugar in a small bowl. Let it rest for 10 minutes.

2. Put the flour, cool water, salt, and olive oil in a stand mixer fitted with a dough hook or in a food processor. Add the starter, and mix at moderate speed or run the processor just until a homogeneous dough forms, usually less than 1 minute. Coat the inside of a mixing bowl with a little olive oil and place the dough in the bowl. Cover with plastic wrap and let the dough rise for at least 8 and up to 12 hours. Alternatively, after the dough has risen for 8 hours, you can refrigerate it for up to 24 hours. Remove it from the refrigerator at least 30 minutes before using it.

3. When you are ready to assemble the pizza, preheat the oven to the highest temperature possible, preferably the convection heat setting, if available; if not, use the regular bake setting.

4. Roll out the dough about ¼ inch thick, sprinkling flour on the counter and the rolling pin as needed to prevent the dough from sticking. If you are using a rectangular baking sheet to cook the pizza, roll the dough into an oval shape; if your baking sheet is square, roll it into a circle.

5. Lightly coat the baking sheet with olive oil. Transfer the dough to the baking sheet and stretch it with your fingers to fit. Add your desired topping and bake until the edges of the dough begin to brown, 10 to 15 minutes. Cut into pieces and serve hot.


Pizza Toppings

Classic Margherita Topping
2 cups canned whole peeled tomatoes with their juice
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
Salt
1 pound buffalo-milk mozzarella (if unavailable, use regular whole-milk mozzarella)
1 teaspoon dried oregano leaves


1. Coarsely chop the tomatoes. Put 1 tablespoon of the olive oil in a 10-inch skillet over medium-high heat. When the oil is hot, add the tomatoes with their juice and season with salt to taste. Cook until the tomatoes are no longer watery, 10 to 15 minutes.

2. While the tomatoes are cooking, cut the mozzarella into ¼-inch dice.

3. Spread the tomatoes over the dough and sprinkle with the mozzarella. Season lightly with salt and sprinkle with the oregano. Finish by drizzling the remaining tablespoon olive oil on top.


Sausage Topping
All the ingredients for Classic Margherita Topping (above)
8 ounces cooked mild pork sausage
1. Follow the instructions for the Margherita topping.
2. Crumble the cooked sausage evenly over the pizza.

Prosciutto Topping
All the ingredients for Classic Margherita Topping
4 ounces thinly sliced prosciutto
1. Follow the instructions for the Margherita topping.
2. Arrange the slices of prosciutto evenly over the pizza.

Grilled Vegetable Topping
All the ingredients for Classic Margherita Topping
½ recipe Grilled Zucchini (page 53)
½ recipe Roasted Peppers (page 51)
1. Follow the instructions for the Margherita topping.
2. Arrange the grilled vegetables evenly over the pizza.

Sautéed Mushroom Topping
All the ingredients for Classic Margherita Topping
1 clove garlic
3 to 4 sprigs flat-leaf Italian parsley
8 ounces fresh white or cremini mushrooms
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
Salt
Freshly ground black pepper


1. Follow the instructions for the Margherita topping.

2. Peel and finely chop the garlic clove. Finely chop enough parsley leaves to measure about 1 tablespoon. With a paper towel, gently brush any dirt from the mushrooms and thinly slice them. Put the olive oil, garlic, and parsley in a 10-inch skillet over medium-high heat. When the garlic is sizzling, add the mushrooms and season with salt and pepper. Cook until the mushrooms are tender and all the liquid they release has evaporated, about 10 minutes.

3. Spread the sautéed mushrooms evenly over the pizza.

Anchovy Topping
All the ingredients for Classic Margherita Topping
12 anchovy fillets


1. Follow the instructions for the Margherita topping.

2. Arrange the anchovies evenly over the pizza.


Alla Marinara (Classic Neapolitan Pizza Topping)
All the ingredients for Classic Margherita Topping, except the mozzarella and oregano
3 cloves garlic


1. Follow the instructions for the Margherita topping, omitting the mozzarella and oregano.

2. Peel and thinly slice the garlic. Sprinkle the garlic over the pizza.


Borekitas

Time from start to finish: 1 hour and 15 minutes

My parents and I went to my grandparents' almost every Friday for Shabbat dinner. I can still taste and smell the wonderful little pies my Nonna Giulia made, which she called borekitas. She made them either with a dough shell or a phyllo shell. The fillings were spinach or cheese. In attempting to replicate them, I used Claudia Roden's The Book of Jewish Food as a guide. Both the cheese and spinach fillings below are just like what I remember, and the dough shell, my favorite of the two, is just as good as the one Nonna Giulia used to make.

Makes about 20 borekitas

For the dough
4 tablespoons butter
1½ cups all-purpose flour
¼ cup vegetable oil
¼ teaspoon salt

For the spinach filling
½ teaspoon salt
8 ounces fresh spinach, washed
1 ounce feta cheese
2 tablespoons whole-milk ricotta cheese

FOR the cheese filling
½ cup freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano
5 ounces feta cheese
2/3 cup whole-milk ricotta cheese

dough

1. Cut the butter into small pieces and allow to come to room temperature.

2. Put all the ingredients in a food processor with ¼ cup water and run it until a smooth, homogeneous dough forms. If it crumbles when pinched, mix in a little more water, 1 tablespoon at a time, until the dough is soft and smooth when pinched.

3. Wrap the dough in plastic and let it rest for about 20 minutes before using.


Spinach filling

1. In a pot large enough to cook the spinach, put about 2 inches of water, and place over high heat. When the water is boiling, add the salt and spinach. Cook until tender, 2 to 3 minutes, then drain.

2. Once the spinach is cool enough to handle, squeeze the excess water out and coarsely chop. Place the spinach in a bowl. Crumble the feta and add it along with the ricotta. Mix thoroughly.

Cheese filling

1. Put all three cheeses in a bowl and mix thoroughly.


Assembling the borekitas

1. Preheat the oven to 350°F on the bake setting.

2. Take about a walnut-size ball of dough, place it on a counter, and press it with your fingers into a disk 2 inches in diameter. Put about 1 tablespoon of either cheese or spinach filling on the disk. Fold the disk over the filling to form a half-moon shape, making sure to pinch the open sides together to seal them, and place on a baking sheet, either oiled or lined with a nonstick baking mat.

3. When all the borekitas are assembled, bake until golden brown, about 20 minutes. Serve warm.


Frittata with Artichokes

Time from start to finish: 45 minutes

A frittata is basically an open-faced omelet in which the filling is mixed into the eggs rather than surrounded by them. I like frittate served both hot and cold. A cold frittata makes a terrific sandwich filling, and I remember my mother often made me a frittata sandwich to take to school for lunch. My favorite, the artichoke frittata, was unfortunately also the most labor-intensive because of having to trim the artichokes. Don't substitute preserved, canned, or frozen artichokes, though—the difference from fresh is like night and day, and once you get the hang of it, it will take you less than five minutes to trim an artichoke.

Serves 4

1 lemon
2 artichokes
½ medium yellow onion
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
3 to 4 sprigs flat-leaf Italian parsley
Salt
5 eggs
½ tablespoon butter


1. Squeeze the juice of the lemon into a bowl of cold water. Trim all the tough parts from the artichokes: Snap the leaves back, leaving behind the tender parts at the bottom, and use a paring knife to trim off all the dark-green parts. Cut off the stems and trim the outer green rings, saving only the white centers; slice and put in the bowl of lemon water. Scoop out the chokes, scraping the hearts clean with a round-tipped dinner knife. Cut each artichoke heart in half lengthwise and then into thin slices. Place the slices in the bowl of lemon water.

2. Peel and finely chop the onion. Place it with the olive oil in a 10-inch nonstick ovenproof skillet over medium-high heat. Sauté until the onion turns a rich golden color, about 5 minutes.

3. While the onion is sautéing, finely chop enough parsley leaves to measure about 1 tablespoon. When the onion is ready, drain the artichokes and add them to the pan along with the parsley. Season with salt, stir well, then add ½ cup water. Cover the pan and cook until the artichokes are tender, 10 to 15 minutes. If there is still liquid in the pan when the artichokes are ready, raise the heat and cook, uncovered, to evaporate any remaining liquid.

4. While the artichokes are cooking, put the eggs in a mixing bowl and beat until the yolks and whites are evenly mixed. When the artichokes are ready, transfer them to the bowl with the eggs and mix thoroughly.

5. Preheat the broiler.

6. Put the butter in the skillet and return to medium heat. When the butter is hot, pour in the egg-and-artichoke mixture. Cook over medium heat for 6 minutes, then place under the broiler until the top is lightly browned, about 2 minutes. Slide the frittata onto a cutting board. Cut into slices and serve hot or at room temperature.


Frittata with Pancetta and Potatoes

Time from start to finish: about 50 minutes

Eggs and bacon with a side of potatoes seems like the all-American breakfast, but it also makes a delicious frittata that's as good cold as it is hot. I like the texture of red potatoes here, but not their skin, so I use larger potatoes, which are easier to peel.

Serves 4

½ pound red potatoes
½ large sweet yellow onion
2 ounces pancetta, sliced ½ inch thick
2 tablespoons butter
Salt
5 eggs
Freshly ground black pepper


1. Put the potatoes in a saucepan and cover with water. Place over high heat and cover the pan. When the water is boiling, reduce the heat to medium-low and cook the potatoes until tender, 25 to 30 minutes, depending on size. Remove the potatoes and peel them as soon as they are cool enough to handle.

2. While the potatoes are cooking, peel and thinly slice the onion crosswise. Unravel the pancetta and cut into narrow strips.

3. Put 1½ tablespoons of the butter in a 10-inch nonstick, ovenproof skillet over medium heat. When the butter has melted, add the pancetta and sauté until it has lost its raw color. Add the onion, season lightly with salt, and continue sautéing until the onion has softened and turned a light caramel color, 8 to 10 minutes.

4. While the onion is sautéing, cut the potatoes in half and slice the halves into half moons about 1/? inch thick. Put the eggs in a mixing bowl and beat until the yolks and whites are evenly mixed.

5. When the onion is ready, add the potatoes, season with salt and pepper, and toss until the potatoes are evenly mixed with the onions and pancetta. Transfer the contents of the pan to the bowl with the eggs and mix thoroughly.

6. Preheat the broiler.

7. Put the remaining ½ tablespoon butter in the skillet and return to medium heat. When the butter is hot, pour in the egg-and-potato mixture. Cook over medium heat for 6 minutes, then place under the broiler until the top is lightly browned, about 2 minutes. Slide the frittata onto a cutting board. Cut into slices and serve hot or at room temperature.


Frittata with Zucchini

Time from start to finish: 35 minutes

One of the vegetable dishes my mother used to teach students at her school in Bologna is Zucchine alla Brianzola, zucchini sautéed with lots of caramelized onions. I used to love this dish best, and have discovered that it also makes a delicious frittata!

Serves 4

½ large sweet yellow onion
3 tablespoons butter
Salt
12 ounces zucchini, preferably small ones
Freshly ground black pepper
5 eggs


1. Peel and thinly slice the onion crosswise. Put 2½ tablespoons of the butter in a 10-inch nonstick, ovenproof skillet over medium heat. When the butter has melted, add the onion and season lightly with salt. Sauté until the onion has softened and turned a light caramel color, 8 to 10 minutes.

2. While the onion is sautéing, wash the zucchini, remove the ends, and cut into thin rounds about 1/8 inch thick. When the onion is ready, add the zucchini and season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the zucchini is quite tender and has started to brown, 10 to 15 minutes.

3. While the zucchini is cooking, put the eggs in a mixing bowl and beat until the yolks and whites are evenly mixed.

4. When the zucchini is ready, transfer the contents of the pan to the bowl with the eggs and mix thoroughly.

5. Preheat the broiler.

6. Put the remaining ½ tablespoon butter in the skillet and return to medium heat. When the butter is hot, pour in the egg-and-zucchini mixture. Cook over medium heat for 6 minutes, then place under the broiler until the top is lightly browned, about 2 minutes. Slide the frittata onto a cutting board. Cut into slices and serve hot or at room temperature.


Homemade Mayonnaise

Time from start to finish: 15 minutes

This mayonnaise is used in Insalata Russa (page 30) and is wonderful with poached fish. Homemade mayonnaise is one of the first things my mother taught me how to make, perhaps because it doesn't involve using the stove. It's not difficult to make but you do have to be careful to avoid "breaking" the mayonnaise, which is when the solids separate and you end up with a grainy, liquid mess—something I remember doing a few times when I was learning. The trickiest part is when you begin adding oil. At first you need to add it slowly, just a little at a time. You don't want to overwhip the eggs either, so as soon as you see that the oil has been incorporated into the mayonnaise, more needs to be added. Some people may be concerned about eating a raw-egg product. The odds are definitely against getting sick, but to be perfectly safe, you can use pasteurized shell eggs. They can be used just like regular eggs, and there is no difference in how the mayonnaise turns out.

Makes about 1¼ cups
2 egg yolks, at room temperature
½ teaspoon salt, or more to taste
1½ cups vegetable oil
2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice, or more to taste


1. Put the egg yolks in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with a whisk attachment.

2. Add the salt and begin beating on medium-high. Beat until the yolks become creamy in consistency and pale in color, 2 to 3 minutes. Begin adding the oil, very slowly at first, pausing periodically to allow it to be incorporated into the eggs. After about ¼ cup of the oil has been added, begin adding the lemon juice, ½ tablespoon at a time. Don't be concerned if the consistency becomes looser. As more oil is beaten in, the mayonnaise will firm up again and then more lemon can be added, ½ tablespoon at a time. Continue until all the oil and lemon juice have been incorporated. Taste, and add more salt or lemon juice if desired. This mayonnaise can be stored in the refrigerator for 2 to 3 days.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from Hazan Family Favorites by Giuliano Hazan, Joseph De Leo, Natalie Kaire. Copyright © 2012 Giuliano Hazan. Excerpted by permission of ABRAMS.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Table of Contents

Contents

Foreword,
Introduction,
Chapter 1 Appetizers, Salads, and Side Dishes,
Chapter 2 Primi: Soups, Pasta, and Rice,
Chapter 3 Secondi: Meats and Seafood,
Chapter 4 Dolci: Desserts,
Conversion Charts,
Index,

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  • Posted June 9, 2012

    A tribute to the women who taught him

    Giuliano’s Hazan Family Favorites—Beloved Italian Recipes—lives up to its title and much, much more. In the book, Giuliano re-creates his childhood taste memories, shares his rich culinary heritage, and describes the food he prepares at home today. Eminently usable, the book will appeal to a broad audience—from novices to experienced cooks. His family is well-travelled and there are recipes from the entire Mediterranean basin. Italy’s regions are well-represented. Dishes range from Piedmontese Savoy Cabbage and Bean Soup to a Sicilian-inspired Risotto with Eggplant. You will venture into the homes of the women who influenced his cooking—his grandmothers and mother Marcella. His grandmothers on both sides settled in Emilia-Romagna, nicknamed “the belly of Italy.” Nonna Mary was a resident of Cesenatico, a fishing village on the Adriatic, and Nonna Giulia lived in nearby Cesena, before moving to New York. Of Giuliano’s five cookbooks, this is the most intensely personal. The family photos span three generations. There are poignant anecdotes and even a hilarious tale of live lobsters jumping off an outdoor grill in Maine. As always Giuliano’s book is well-organized and the instructions are easy to follow. There are valuable cooking tips—for instance in the Photo-Shoot Chicken recipe, the first one I tried, he says “The trick to getting moist breast meat is simple. Cook it less than the dark meat.” A tribute to the cooks who taught him, the book captures the Hazan family spirit. The full color food photography by Joseph De Leo is spectacular.

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  • Posted May 2, 2012

    I purchased this new cookbook yesterday at my local store; I sna

    I purchased this new cookbook yesterday at my local store; I snagged the last copy.
    I am already enjoying it and I have not even tried a recipe yet! It is a wonderful book to read, not just to cook from. It is like a foodie's memoir, starting with the Introduction by Marcella Hazan and the author's own thoughts, all the way through to the end. The book includes stories about each recipe, gorgeous photographs of the food, and is sprinkled with cherished family photos. Highly recommended. Reserve a copy online before you head over to your store or order online, since at my local store they can't keep it in stock.

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