Haze: Essays, Poems, Prose

Haze: Essays, Poems, Prose

by Mark Wallace
     
 


Poetry. Fiction. Cross-Genre. "Marvelous! A book that thinks! and that speaks out plainly and politically. In this collection of short essays, poems, and various hybrid genres, Mark Wallace takes poetry seriously--and often in the most tongue-in-cheek way, but below the quick wit is a belief in and love of language and the art that it can make. Wallace has made…  See more details below

Overview


Poetry. Fiction. Cross-Genre. "Marvelous! A book that thinks! and that speaks out plainly and politically. In this collection of short essays, poems, and various hybrid genres, Mark Wallace takes poetry seriously--and often in the most tongue-in-cheek way, but below the quick wit is a belief in and love of language and the art that it can make. Wallace has made that art here. "If poetry is, as I believe, the art that allows people access to their own complexity..." he writes, and goes on from there to show what can happen in a world where this is true. It's news"--Cole Swensen.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
With debts to past masters of postmodern collage from Ed Dorn to Charles Bernstein, Wallace's poems seem drier, more direct, more clearly political than their precedents. Almost equally divided between verse sequences and very personal, almost curt, critical essays, Wallace (Nothing Happened and Besides I Wasn't There) tweaks all assumptions, from the complacencies of mass entertainment to the axioms of the artsy left, hammering home provocative ideas with confrontation and harsh clarity: "I don't admire Rimbaud. He's not worthy of it. But what could be more boring than admiring a poet?" An essay surveys "recent non-mainstream poetics," returning to inescapable debates about "the personal and the political, the partial and the collective," advancing the tricky concepts of "discourse" and "haze," and asking outright: "what is the relation between the poetry we are involved in and the kind of life we want ourselves and others to lead?" The final verse sequence lists plots from horror movies, likening their shared features to the paranoia Wallace finds in everyday life: "A man with the head of a fly/ A monster with wings who sits on churches/ A devil who wants to buy your soul/ Deformed human beings in a circus sideshow"; it introduces a society in which "I think the thoughts they want me to think." But Wallace's subtlest, most original work here is in "How to Finish a Story, or My Correspondence School," whose 10 dense pages explain that "One continues, if one does, without/ younger urgency" and promises slyly (in a sentence that takes a whole page) "THIS/ IS/ AS/ SIMPLE/ AS/ IT/ SEEMS/ BUT/ NOT/ AS/ IT/ GETS." (Apr.) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781890311155
Publisher:
Edge Books
Publication date:
06/01/2005
Pages:
103
Product dimensions:
5.90(w) x 8.80(h) x 0.40(d)

Meet the Author


Mark Wallace's most recent book is Felonies of Illusion, just out from Edge Books. His most recent book of fiction is Walking Dreams: Selected Early Tales. Wallace has authored more than ten books and chapbooks of poetry, including Nothing Happened and Besides I Wasn't There and Sonnets of a Penny-A-Liner. Temporary Worker Rides A Subway won the 2002 Gertrude Stein Poetry Award and was published by Green Integer Books. His multi-genre work Haze (Edge Books) was published in 2004, and his first collection of fiction, The Big Lie, was published by Avec Books in Fall 2000. His critical articles and reviews have appeared in numerous publications. Along with Steven Marks, he edited Telling It Slant: Avant Garde Poetics of the 1990s (University of Alabama Press) a collection of 26 essays by different writers on the subject of contemporary avant garde poetry and poetics. Wallace teaches literature and creative writing at Cal State San Marcos.

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