He Saw a Hummingbird

( 3 )

Overview

An inspirational book about a man who wasn't supposed to be able to see and a bird that wasn't supposed to be able to fly.

Despite severe diabetes, Russell Ogg was a successful photographer who traveled worldwide with his wife, journalist Norma Lee Browning. He's always been able to cope with anything, but when diabetes began to rob him of his sight, "it was like a violinist losing his fingers."

When Norma Lee saw him sitting day after day on ...

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Overview

An inspirational book about a man who wasn't supposed to be able to see and a bird that wasn't supposed to be able to fly.

Despite severe diabetes, Russell Ogg was a successful photographer who traveled worldwide with his wife, journalist Norma Lee Browning. He's always been able to cope with anything, but when diabetes began to rob him of his sight, "it was like a violinist losing his fingers."

When Norma Lee saw him sitting day after day on the patio of their home in Palm Springs, slumped in despair, his sightless eyes fixed on nothing, she too became depressed. But a miracle was about to happen. Then suddenly a red hummingbird appeared that changed their lives.

Norma Lee frankly describes her doubts and the errors she made in identifying the birds her husband tried to photograph. She also concludes, from her close observation of the hummers, that "the experts" are wrong on many counts.

But the miracle that provides the heart-warming conclusion to this unusual story involves Russell Ogg's eyesight. His sight improved. His eye doctor said he saw better than it was possible for him to see. "There is no way to explain medically how he does it...his photographs tell us something about the magnificence of man."

He Saw a Hummingbird is a testament to human courage and hope.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780595129744
  • Publisher: iUniverse, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 9/22/2000
  • Pages: 168
  • Sales rank: 345,782
  • Product dimensions: 6.03 (w) x 9.04 (h) x 0.45 (d)

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 3 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 11, 2013

    Jaysoar, author of Jaysoar's story and Hawkpool and the disaster

    Good job! Please read my story at blood wing all results or jaysoar all results.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 11, 2013

    That didnt really make sense.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 11, 2013

    Darkest hour chapter one

    I bustled through the sidewalks, the smoke blocking my vision, yet the smell of roses scented out the smell of death in a weird yet sweet aroma. "Emilly, come back!" Jeremy called, but his voice was blocked out by the song of the burners. It was frightful, yet Granddad considered it a nursery rhyme. Such a strange song to be a nursery rhyme. This event was so sad and scary, yet they considered it a nursery rhyme. I could see people laying, waiting for the disposers to pick them up and give them to the burners. "Emilly!" This time, Jeremy's voice went above the frightful sound of the so-called nursery rhyme. He grabbed my wrist. I wriggled away because of one reason: Frankie. She would considered burnable if she hadn't survived this far. She had it- the thing that troubled us all; the one that gave the burners and disposers their jobs. I could hear the singing behind me- the singing of pickers, disposers and burners. "Ring around the rosies Pocket full of posies," the pickers sang. "Ashes Ashes," the burners sang. "We all fall down," the disposers concluded. I was eleven years old then, I knew what it all meant. From the roses down to the falling. Dead smells, burning people, all of that was in the song. And it was happening right then. Jeremy didn't touch me, because neither of us wanted the thing. The Big Bang, they called it. No running water was allowed to be used in Jeremy's house, Frankie used it. Jeremy washed his hands in the river. No hats near Frankie. He put his hats outside. No hats in a large group, either. Dad gunit, he even had to eat out of his farmiliar. In our farmiliar. This thing was terrifying- almost a nightmare. Maybe even a real nightmare.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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