He Shall Thunder in the Sky (Amelia Peabody Series #12)

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Overview

The clouds of World War I hang heavy over Cairo, as Amelia Peabody and her family return to Egypt for another season of archaeological excavation. The defianly pacifist stance of Amelia and Emerson's headstrong son, Ramses, is earning the young man the derision, and much worse, of the British expatriate community. Meanwhile, the charismatic nationalist el Wardani is said to be formenting insurrection in the ancient city. And an exquisite sculpture found where it ought not to be confirms Amelia's most unsettling ...

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Overview

The clouds of World War I hang heavy over Cairo, as Amelia Peabody and her family return to Egypt for another season of archaeological excavation. The defianly pacifist stance of Amelia and Emerson's headstrong son, Ramses, is earning the young man the derision, and much worse, of the British expatriate community. Meanwhile, the charismatic nationalist el Wardani is said to be formenting insurrection in the ancient city. And an exquisite sculpture found where it ought not to be confirms Amelia's most unsettling suspicion about the reemergence of her villainous archnemesis, Sethos, the Master Criminal. Here is a magnificent new masterwork in a series destined to make history.

About the Author:

Elizabeth Peters earned her Ph.D. in Egyptology from the University of Chicago's famed Oriental Institute. An Agatha Award-winning author, Ms. Peters was named Grandmaster at the inaugural Anthony Awards in 1986, and Grandmaster by the Mystery Writers of America at the Edgar Awards in 1998. She lives in Frederick, MD.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
You've got your romance. You've got your archaeology. You've got your mystery and myth. You've even got your basic world war. And most of all you've got your great Elizabeth Peters gift for gab.

Translate to: While America is on the brink of war in 1914-1915, Amelia Peabody and her husband are working merrily away at their Egyptian archeological site, pressed into acknowledging the war only because of their son's machinations. Ramses not only has time for political brinksmanship -- he also has time to finally do something about his love life (i.e., Nefret).

This is all well and good. Nobody ever accused Elizabeth Peters of constructing a faulty or dull plot. But what you read her for is the writing. God blessed her with that rarest of gifts, charm, and it can be found in virtually every line. Her tongue is sardonic but rarely tart; amiable but never silly; satiric but never mean. She sees us for what we are, I think, and forgives us nonetheless. And she manages to do all this with a storyline that H. Rider Haggard would have envied for complexity, and G. K. Chesterton for social pith.

If you like stories about Egypt; if you like spunky romance; if you like the derring-do of turn-of-the-century espionage; and most important of all, if you like to laugh a lot, HE SHALL THUNDER IN THE SKY is the book for you.

This is certainly one of the two or three best Amelia Peabody's I've read; maybe the best.

--Ed Gorman

Washington Post
Amelia Peabody is Indiana Jones, Sherlock Holmes, and Miss Marple all in one.
NY Times Book Review
Between Amelia Peabody and Indiana Jones, it's Amelia—in wit and daring—by a landslide.
San Francisco Examiner
Her characters are delights...[Ramses] could put Indiana Jones out of business in a few years.
Barnes & Noble Guide to New Fiction
Pacifist Amelia Peabody, in Egypt on an excavation project on the eve of World War I, finds herself in hot water with the British ex-pat community when her nemesis, the Master Criminal Sethos, reappears.
Orlando Sentinel
...intelligent plotting, engaging characters and stylish writing, and we can hardly ask for anything more—except another entry in the series.
Chicago Tribune
Hard to put down....Picking up the latest Elizabeth Peters mystery is like hearing from old friends and learning of their latest adventures.
Philadelphia Inquirer
Amelia has really pitched a tent in our hearts.
USA Today
A new Amelia Peabody mystery is like visiting old friends.
People
Kicks up a desert storm....[Peters] mixes hilarity with the history lesson.
San Francisco Chronicle
Peters's wily cast of characters keeps the reader coming back for more.
San Francisco Examiner
It is pure delight.
New York Times Book Review
Between Amelia Peabody and Indiana Jones, it's Amelia—in wit and daring—by a landslide.
San Francisco Chronicle
Peters's wily cast of characters keeps the reader coming back for more.
San Francisco Examiner
It is pure delight.
Baltimore Sun
Amelia fans generally chorus that every new adventure is the most enjoyable one yet. No impulse here to change the tune.
New York Post
Breathtaking....so much fun.
Washington Post Book World
Filled with intrigue and nail-biting suspense...rich with detail and realism...ripe with tension and peril...Peters is surely the grande dame of historical mystery.
Chicago Tribune
Hard to put down....Picking up the latest Elizabeth Peters mystery is like hearing from old friends and learning of their latest adventures.
Philadelphia Inquirer
Amelia has really pitched a tent in our hearts.
USA Today
A new Amelia Peabody mystery is like visiting old friends.
Baltimore Sun
Amelia fans generally chorus that every new adventure is the most enjoyable one yet. No impulse here to change the tune.
Orlando Sentinel
...intelligent plotting, engaging characters and stylish writing, and we can hardly ask for anything more—except another entry in the series.
New York Times Book Review
Between Amelia Peabody and Indiana Jones, it's Amelia—in wit and daring—by a landslide.
Washington Post Book World
Filled with intrigue and nail-biting suspense...rich with detail and realism...ripe with tension and peril...Peters is surely the grande dame of historical mystery.
New York Post
Breathtaking....so much fun.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
The latest superb installment in this renowned series is one of Peters's best. Amelia Peabody Emerson and her husband are the sort of dauntless archeologists who would never let a minor event like a world war distract them from their work. After all, they've been digging in the mild Egyptian winters for years. Now the younger members of the family--son Ramses and foster son and daughter David and Nefret--join their intrepid elders in their adventures, and the saga is all the richer for the new blood. As the Middle Eastern front of World War I develops during the excavation season of 1914-1915, the British are determined to hold Egypt and the Suez Canal against the Turks, who are allies of Germany. Ramses is loudly proclaiming pacifist sentiments, even as elderly ladies are handing him white feathers as a symbol of cowardice. Amelia and husband Emerson are doggedly trying to continue their usual work schedule in the face of the growing horrors of the war and the machinations of villains as evil as they have ever encountered. Even Lawrence of Arabia has a minor part to play. Despite having produced 11 previous tales of Egyptological mystery and detection, Peters still writes a deeply satisfying story that combines elements of espionage, mystery and romance. Some big surprises are in store for readers while Peters deftly ties her subplots together, but a few threads are left dangling enticingly at the end, leaving fans to expect another installment in this extraordinary series. Dual Selection of the Mystery Guild. (May) Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.|
Library Journal
Excavating in Egypt on the eve of World War I, Amelia Peabody is in trouble with the British ex-pat community for her pacifist beliefs even as her nemesis--Sethos, the Master Criminal--reappears. Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.\
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780380798582
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 4/28/2001
  • Series: Amelia Peabody Series , #12
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Edition description: Reissue
  • Pages: 512
  • Product dimensions: 4.18 (w) x 6.75 (h) x 1.02 (d)

Meet the Author

Elizabeth Peters

Elizabeth Peters earned her Ph.D. in Egyptology from the University of Chicago's famed Oriental Institute. She was named Grand Master at the inaugural Anthony Awards in 1986 and Grand Master by the Mystery Writers of America in 1998. In 2003, she received the Lifetime Achievement Award at the Malice Domestic Convention. She lives in a historic farmhouse in western Maryland.

Biography

Neither the Great Depression nor the lack of a public library in her small hometown of Canton, Illinois, deterred Barbara Mertz (the future Elizabeth Peters) from becoming an avid reader. Yet, when her family moved to a suburb of Chicago, she was elated to discover the riches contained in the town's local library and proceeded to devour every book she could get her hands on. She began writing in high school; but by that time she had already decided to become an archaeologist.

Mertz received a scholarship to the University of Chicago, which boasted a world-famous Egyptology department. Her mother, an eminently practical soul, encouraged her daughter to become a teacher; but after taking only two education courses, Mertz knew a career in the classroom was not for her. Determined to follow her dream, she moved over to the university's Oriental Institute, and received her Ph.D. in Egyptology at the age of 23.

The post-WWII job market wasn't kind to women in general, much less to women seeking careers in archaeology. Mertz married and began a family, but never lost sight of her life's ambition. While she was raising her two children, she decided to try her hand at writing. Her first few attempts were never published, but they did land her an agent; and in 1964 she published her first book, Temples, Tombs and Hieroglyphs: A Popular History of Ancient Egypt.

Mertz authored two additional works on archaeology before foraying into fiction in 1966. The Master of Blacktower is the first of several gothic suspense novels written under the pseudonym Barbara Michaels. (In her biography, she explains that the use of pseudonyms helps readers to distinguish various types of books written by a single author.) The supernatural elements in the thrillers penned under the Michaels name have kept readers on the edge of their seats for decades.

In the 1970s, Mertz began writing under her second, more famous pseudonym, Elizabeth Peters. As Peters, she has authored books in three different series. Beginning in 1972 with The Seventh Sinner (1972), the first series features a glamorous librarian-turned-romance novelist named Jacqueline Kirby (the final Jacqueline Kirby mystery, Naked Once More, won a coveted Agatha Award in 1989). The second series, starring American art historian Vicky Bliss, debuted in 1973 with Borrower of the Night (Vicky's last outing was 2008's Laughter of Dead Kings). Then, in 1975, Peters introduced her most famous protagonist, archeologist/sleuth Amelia Peabody, in a dandy adventure entitled Crocodile on the Sandbank.

From the first, readers loved Amelia, a plucky Victorian feminist who—together with her husband, the distinguished Egyptologist Radcliffe Emerston—has gone on to solve countless mysteries in the Middle East. Peabody fans received an extra treat in 2003 with Amelia Peabody's Egypt: A Compendium to Her Journals, a nonfiction stroll through ancient Egypt that included nearly 600 photographs and illustrations, plus expert academic articles.

In addition to her three series, Mertz has written several standalone suspense novels as Elizabeth Peters. She has this to say about her successful, prolific career: "The craft of writing delights me. It is impossible to attain perfection; there is always something more to be learned—figuring out new techniques of plotting or characterization, struggling with recalcitrant sentences until I force them to approximate my meaning. And nothing is ever wasted. Everything one sees and hears, everything one learns, can be used."

Good To Know

The pseudonym Elizabeth Peters is taken from her two children, Elizabeth and Peter. She uses three pseudonyms so readers can tell the difference between the three types of books she writes: nonfiction archaeology as Barbara Mertz, supernatural thrillers as Barbara Michaels and historical mysteries as Peters. For the record, Mertz has called the pseudonyms "a horrible nuisance."
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    1. Also Known As:
      Barbara Mertz, Barbara Michaels
    2. Hometown:
      A farm in rural Maryland
    1. Date of Birth:
      September 29, 1927
    2. Place of Birth:
      Canton, Illinois
    1. Date of Death:
      August 8, 2013

Read an Excerpt

Chapter One

I found it lying on the floor of the corridor that led to our sleeping chambers. I was standing there, holding it between my fingertips, when Ramses came out of his room. When he saw what I had in my hand his heavy dark eyebrows lifted, but he waited for me to speak first.

"Another white feather," I said. "Yours, I presume?"

"Yes, thank you." He plucked it from my fingers. "It must have fallen from my pocket when I took out my handkerchief. I will put it with the others."

Except for his impeccably accented English and a certain indefinable air about his bearing (I always say no one slouches quite as elegantly as an Englishman), an observer might have taken my son for one of the Egyptians among whom he had spent most of his life. He had the same wavy black hair and thick lashes, the same bronzed skin. In other ways he bore a strong resemblance to his father, who had emerged from our room in time to hear the foregoing exchange. Like Ramses, he had changed to his working costume of wrinkled flannels and collarless shirt, and as they stood side by side they looked more like elder and younger brother than father and son. Emerson's tall, broad-shouldered frame was as trim as that of Ramses, and the streak of white hair at each temple emphasized the gleam of his raven locks.

At the moment the resemblance between them was obscured by the difference in their expressions. Emerson's sapphire-blue orbs blazed; his son's black eyes were half-veiled by lowered lids. Emerson's brows were drawn together, Ramses's were raised; Ramses's lips were tightly compressed, while Emerson's had drawn back to display his large squareteeth.

"Curse it," he shouted. "Who had the confounded audacity to accuse you of cowardice? I hope you punched him on the jaw!"

"I could hardly have done that, since the kind donor was a lady," Ramses replied, tucking the white feather carefully into his shirt pocket.

"Who?" I demanded.

"What does it matter? It is not the first I have received, nor will it be the last."

Since the outbreak of war in August, a good many fowl had been denuded of their plumage by patriotic ladies who presented these symbols of cowardice to young men not in uniform. Patriotism is not a quality I despise, but in my humble opinion it is despicable to shame someone into facing dangers from which one is exempt by reason of gender, age, or physical disability. Two of my nephews and the sons of many of our friends were on their way to France. I would not have held them back, but neither would I have had it on my conscience that I had urged them to go.

I had not been obliged to face that painful choice with my son.

We had sailed for Egypt in October, since my dear Emerson (the greatest Egyptologist of this or any other age) would not have allowed anyone, much less the Kaiser, to interfere with his annual excavations. It was not a retreat from peril; in fact, we might soon be in greater danger than those who remained in England. That the Ottoman Empire would eventually enter the war on the side of Germany and Austro-Hungary no one of intelligence doubted. For years the Kaiser had courted the Sultan, lending him vast amounts of money and building railroads and bridges through Syria and Palestine. Even the German-financed archaeological expeditions in the area were believed to have an ulterior motive. Archaeology offers excellent cover for spying and subversion, and moralists were fond of pointing out that the flag of imperial Germany flew over the site of Megiddo, the biblical Armageddon.

Turkey's entry into the war came on November 5, and it was followed by the formal annexation of Egypt by Britain; the Veiled Protectorate had become a protectorate in reality. The Turks controlled Palestine, and between Palestine and Egypt lay the Sinai and the Suez Canal, Britain's lifeline to the east. The capture of the Canal would deal Britain a mortal blow. An invasion of Egypt would surely follow, for the Ottoman Empire had never forgiven or forgotten the loss of its former province. And to the west of Egypt the warlike Senussi tribesmen, armed and trained by Turkey, presented a growing threat to British-occupied Egypt.

By December Cairo was under martial law, the press censored, public assemblages (of Egyptians) forbidden, the Khedive deposed in favor of his more compliant uncle, the nascent nationalist movement suppressed and its leaders sent into exile or prison. These regrettable measures were justified, at least in the eyes of those who enforced them, by the increasing probability of an attack on the Canal. I could understand why nerves in Cairo were somewhat strained, but that was no excuse, in my opinion, for rude behavior to my son.

"It is not fair," I exclaimed. "I have not seen the young English officials in Cairo rushing off to volunteer. Why has public opinion concentrated on you?"

Ramses shrugged. His foster sister had once compared his countenance to that of a pharaonic statue because of the regularity of his features and their habitual impassivity. At this moment they looked even stonier than usual.

"I have been rather too prone to express in public what I feel about this senseless, wasteful war. It's probably because I was not properly brought up," he added seriously. "You never taught me that the young should defer to their elders."

"I tried," I assured him.

Emerson fingered the dimple (or cleft, as he prefers to call it) in his chin, as was his habit when deep in thought or somewhat perturbed. "I understand your reluctance to shoot at poor fellows whose only crime is that they have been conscripted by their leaders; but-er-is it true that you refused to join the staff of the new Military Intelligence Department?"

"Ah," said Ramses thoughtfully. "So that bit of information is now public property? No wonder so many charming ladies have recently added to my collection of feathers. Yes, sir, I did refuse. Would you like me to justify my decision?"

"No," Emerson muttered.

"Mother?"

"Er-no, it is not necessary."

"I am greatly obliged to you," said Ramses...

He Shall Thunder in the Sky. Copyright © by Elizabeth Peters. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
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Table of Contents

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First Chapter

Chapter One

I found it lying on the floor of the corridor that led to our sleeping chambers. I was standing there, holding it between my fingertips, when Ramses came out of his room. When he saw what I had in my hand his heavy dark eyebrows lifted, but he waited for me to speak first.

"Another white feather," I said. "Yours, I presume?"

"Yes, thank you." He plucked it from my fingers. "It must have fallen from my pocket when I took out my handkerchief. I will put it with the others."

Except for his impeccably accented English and a certain indefinable air about his bearing (I always say no one slouches quite as elegantly as an Englishman), an observer might have taken my son for one of the Egyptians among whom he had spent most of his life. He had the same wavy black hair and thick lashes, the same bronzed skin. In other ways he bore a strong resemblance to his father, who had emerged from our room in time to hear the foregoing exchange. Like Ramses, he had changed to his working costume of wrinkled flannels and collarless shirt, and as they stood side by side they looked more like elder and younger brother than father and son. Emerson's tall, broad-shouldered frame was as trim as that of Ramses, and the streak of white hair at each temple emphasized the gleam of his raven locks.

At the moment the resemblance between them was obscured by the difference in their expressions. Emerson's sapphire-blue orbs blazed; his son's black eyes were half-veiled by lowered lids. Emerson's brows were drawn together, Ramses's were raised; Ramses's lips were tightly compressed, while Emerson's had drawn back to display his large square teeth.

"Curse it," he shouted. "Who had the confounded audacity to accuse you of cowardice? I hope you punched him on the jaw!"

"I could hardly have done that, since the kind donor was a lady," Ramses replied, tucking the white feather carefully into his shirt pocket.

"Who?" I demanded.

"What does it matter? It is not the first I have received, nor will it be the last."

Since the outbreak of war in August, a good many fowl had been denuded of their plumage by patriotic ladies who presented these symbols of cowardice to young men not in uniform. Patriotism is not a quality I despise, but in my humble opinion it is despicable to shame someone into facing dangers from which one is exempt by reason of gender, age, or physical disability. Two of my nephews and the sons of many of our friends were on their way to France. I would not have held them back, but neither would I have had it on my conscience that I had urged them to go.

I had not been obliged to face that painful choice with my son.

We had sailed for Egypt in October, since my dear Emerson (the greatest Egyptologist of this or any other age) would not have allowed anyone, much less the Kaiser, to interfere with his annual excavations. It was not a retreat from peril; in fact, we might soon be in greater danger than those who remained in England. That the Ottoman Empire would eventually enter the war on the side of Germany and Austro-Hungary no one of intelligence doubted. For years the Kaiser had courted the Sultan, lending him vast amounts of money and building railroads and bridges through Syria and Palestine. Even the German-financed archaeological expeditions in the area were believed to have an ulterior motive. Archaeology offers excellent cover for spying and subversion, and moralists were fond of pointing out that the flag of imperial Germany flew over the site of Megiddo, the biblical Armageddon.

Turkey's entry into the war came on November 5, and it was followed by the formal annexation of Egypt by Britain; the Veiled Protectorate had become a protectorate in reality. The Turks controlled Palestine, and between Palestine and Egypt lay the Sinai and the Suez Canal, Britain's lifeline to the east. The capture of the Canal would deal Britain a mortal blow. An invasion of Egypt would surely follow, for the Ottoman Empire had never forgiven or forgotten the loss of its former province. And to the west of Egypt the warlike Senussi tribesmen, armed and trained by Turkey, presented a growing threat to British-occupied Egypt.

By December Cairo was under martial law, the press censored, public assemblages (of Egyptians) forbidden, the Khedive deposed in favor of his more compliant uncle, the nascent nationalist movement suppressed and its leaders sent into exile or prison. These regrettable measures were justified, at least in the eyes of those who enforced them, by the increasing probability of an attack on the Canal. I could understand why nerves in Cairo were somewhat strained, but that was no excuse, in my opinion, for rude behavior to my son.

"It is not fair," I exclaimed. "I have not seen the young English officials in Cairo rushing off to volunteer. Why has public opinion concentrated on you?"

Ramses shrugged. His foster sister had once compared his countenance to that of a pharaonic statue because of the regularity of his features and their habitual impassivity. At this moment they looked even stonier than usual.

"I have been rather too prone to express in public what I feel about this senseless, wasteful war. It's probably because I was not properly brought up," he added seriously. "You never taught me that the young should defer to their elders."

"I tried," I assured him.

Emerson fingered the dimple (or cleft, as he prefers to call it) in his chin, as was his habit when deep in thought or somewhat perturbed. "I understand your reluctance to shoot at poor fellows whose only crime is that they have been conscripted by their leaders; but-er-is it true that you refused to join the staff of the new Military Intelligence Department?"

"Ah," said Ramses thoughtfully. "So that bit of information is now public property? No wonder so many charming ladies have recently added to my collection of feathers. Yes, sir, I did refuse. Would you like me to justify my decision?"

"No," Emerson muttered.

"Mother?"

"Er-no, it is not necessary."

"I am greatly obliged to you," said Ramses...

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Interviews & Essays

Exclusive Author Essay
The Emersons' Enemy Tally

One of the problems I run into when writing the Amelia Peabody mysteries is supplying a sufficient number of villains to occupy that intrepid lady and her formidable family. Luckily for me I have been able to recycle some of them; none of the Emersons believe in killing people "unless it is absolutely necessary," so many of their adversaries have lived to fight again another day. Recently I ran across a list of these individuals, which Amelia had made for purposes of reference, or for her own amusement -- who can say? There were certainly enough of them to require an aide memoir.

Lucas Hayes: Cousin of Amelia's friend Evelyn. When last heard of he was living precariously somewhere on the continent. "If he does not drink himself to death," Amelia comments, "some outraged husband or father will undoubtedly shoot him."

Alberto: Lucas's co-conspirator. His cellmate informed Amelia that Pietro had passed on "quite peacefully."

Mohammed: Son of the mayor of El Till and another conspirator. After their first encounter the Emersons let him get away, which was a mistake; he returned a few years later, as evil as ever.

Lady Baskerville: Murderess and adulteress. Amelia doesn't say what became of her; given her social status and her gender, it is possible she was sentenced to life imprisonment instead of being executed.

Count Kalenischeff: A sinister Russian, part of the Master Criminal's gang. Found weltering in his gore in the bedroom of a lady to whom he was not married.

Ahmed the Louse: Drug user and dealer in London. Found floating in the Thames.

Eustace Wilson: A murderer twice over, his eventual fate is never mentioned. He was turned over to the police, so one may suppose he was hanged, since he had not social position or enough money to hire a good lawyer.

Reggie Forthright: He tried to lead the Emersons astray in the desert and hand his young cousin Nefret over to a lecherous prince of the Lost Oasis. The last we heard of him, he was still there.

Nastasen: The lecherous prince. He was alive if not well when last heard of.

Riccetti: Vicious, repulsive dealer in illegal antiquities, killer and kidnapper. Sent to prison by the Emersons. No recent mention of him.

The Reverend Ezekiel Jones: Suffered from homicidal mania brought on by religious mania. At last report he had proclaimed himself the Messiah and was being tended by his acolytes.

Leopold Vincey, a.k.a. Schlange: Shot by Emerson -- in self defense, of course.

Bertha: Schlange's confederate, a brilliantly clever and evil woman. She stalked the Emersons through several volumes of the saga and was finally killed after she had murdered one of their best friends.

Matilda: Bertha's henchwoman. Present whereabouts unknown.

Dutton Scudder, a.k.a. Booghis Tucker Tollingon: His inclusion in the list is somewhat questionable. Anyhow, he's dead.

Colonel Bellingham: Murdered at least one of his wives and tried to kill several other people, including Amelia.

Geoffrey Godwin: Fell into a tomb shaft after a comprehensive list of crimes.

Percival Peabody: Amelia's nephew, "one of the few truly evil men I have ever known." Reported to have died on the way to hospital.

AND FIRST AND LAST:

Sethos, a.k.a. the Master, a.k.a. the Master Criminal: Undoubtedly their most dangerous and interesting opponent. Guilty of kidnapping, attempted seduction, murder, and attempted murder, grand theft, petty theft, and continual aggravation.

The list does not include various nameless henchpersons, thugs, and thieves. (Elizabeth Peters)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 50 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 26, 2009

    I love a great series... I always hope they never end!

    I have watched the character from a baby to age 20 and everything that has happened in his life. His parents have aged marvelously. Elizabeth Peters is truly a gifted writer as she takes us through all these wonderful adventures with this family, both in England and in Egypt. It makes me want to travel to Egypt someday to see these sights.
    I love the way she mixes the romance and the adventure.
    Just can't stop reading!!!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 31, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Elizabeth Peters Fan

    I have read this book countless times, and it is still just as good as the first time. Elizabeth Peters is phenomenal, her writing style is smart, witty, and clever. He Shall Thunder in the Sky is an exciting read. I totally recommend the Amelia Peabody series for anyone. Peters has a way of including romance in her books without being explicit which is refreshing.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 20, 2002

    So Excited!

    I must admit that in THE FALCON IN THE PORTAL, after Nefret and Ramses have that wonderful romantic interlude, then she runs off with the chappy (Unfortunately I can't remember how one spells his name) I was terribly disappointed, I think that I even threw the book down and cursed Ms. Peters for destroying Ramses and Nefret. But However when i read HE SHALL THUNDER IN THE SKY, and in the end one just knows that they'll get married, I was So excited!! i jumped up and down. I couldn't wait to hear more about them.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 22, 2013

    Great stories

    Elizabeth Peter's Amelia Peabody books are wonderful. Each one better than the last. They make me want to go to Egypt.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 1, 2013

    Spottedkit

    Nice job, Petalstorm. :D (i am going to start my med training tomorrow, yay!)

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 31, 2013

    To Cardinal

    Written like a Warriors book. Wonderful beggining, it was enough to catch my attention. Can't wait to read more!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 31, 2013

    Thundering Skies- Chapter One

    Silverkit sat impatiently, her brother, Talonkit, sitting beside her. Talonkit leaned over to her and whispered, "Do you think she's ok?" Silverkit looked t him her eyes filled with worry. Im sure she is. She's our sister, and she can't die. Because she is gonna become the strongest warrior in the forest." She meowed. Then there was a sound from the medicane cat den. Talonkit angled his ears to it and a big black and brown tom padded out. The tom looked at the kits. "Im sorry my darlings but......Spottedkit is dead." Silverkit gasped in horror. Talonkit ran up to the tom. "She can't be! She is strong!" The tom nuzzled Talonkit. "Its ok my son. You've still got Silverkit." Silverkit padded up to them sadly. They could hear wails from the den, obviously from their mother, Goldentail. Silverkit whimpered at the thought of Spottedkit dead. The tom went back to the medicane den to calm Goldentail down. Thornstar, a large golden brown tom, padded up to the sad kits. "What is happening?" The leader asked. Talonkit answered. "Spottedkit is...dead." He broke out into sobs. Thornstar frowned. "I am so sorry for you two kits loss." He dipped his head to the kits. Silverkit left the two toms and went to spread the sad news. First she went to tell the elders. Redpelt and Mooncloud, her mothers parents, rushed up to the kit. "What is wrong?" Asked Redpelt. "Spottedkit is dead." Silverkit meowed. "Oh my." Mooncloud said. She nodded and then went to the queens and oter kits. Roseflight was there, who was expecting kits any day now, and so was Frostcloud. Her kits, Bluekit and Hawkkit, bounded up to Silverkit. "Want to play mossball?" Hawkkit asked. Silverkit walked past them and went up to the two queens. Sh opened her mouth to tell them but Frostcloud stopped her. "Its ok Silverkit. Me and Roseflight already know. And almost half the warriors do, too." She pointedith her tail to a group of warriors and a queen, Petalstorm, talking in quiet voices. Silverkit nodded and then headed to her brother. She guessed that the apprentices knew already, as of two of them being her older siblings. Talonkit was laying on the floor sobbing his eyes out. He must had seen the body. He left him there and went to the med den to see it. Skyfall, Goldentail, Acornfall the medicane cat, and Mosspaw the med cat apprentice were all there. Just then, there was comotion in the main part of camp. She stuck her head out of the med den and saw four warriors, Rainheart, Whitefoot, Blizzardpelt, and Midnightwhisker run in. They ran to Thornstar. He asked, "What is going on?" Rainheart answered. "We spotted a PineClan battle patrol at the border!" Thornstar nodded and ran up the flame tree. "All cats old enough to catch their own prey gather beneath the Flame Tree for a clan meeting!" Everyone gathered below and looked up at him. "Everyone prepare for a battle! PineClan has been spotted at the border with a battle patrol!" He yelled. Roseflight, Frostcloud, and all the kits went to the nursery. Petalstorm stood outside the nursery with Blizzardpelt, Sandpelt, and Cardinalfeather. Skyfall and Goldentail dashed out of the medicane den and both went to the elders den to protect Redpelt, Mooncloud, and Owlwing. Arrowpaw, Dawnpaw, and Cloverpaw prepared for battle with their mentors while Patchpaw scurried up to Watch Rock to look over the forest....<p>
    Please leave a comment! Next chapter in result two! Hope you liked it!<p>
    ~Cardinal (^•)>

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 1, 2012

    Another great read

    This storyline was a bit different from Ms. Peters' usual stories. It dealt more with the Emerson family's involvement during World War One in that part of the world. It would be unfair to give away most of the story here -- one must savor the expense and drama firsthand. To those persons, I wish happy reading.

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  • Posted February 25, 2012

    Still going strong

    I read a lot of series books and by the time the twelfth one comes along, more often than not the author has run out of steam; "jumped the shark" as they say. Not so with Elizabeth Peters. Her characters continue to mature and grow and are people with whom I enjoy spending time. They have their faults and I admit that I became so mad at Nefret in this one, that I had to remind myself that this is fiction to get to sleep! There is never a dirth of dire circumstances that Amelia and her family find themselves involved in, but my credulity is never stretched beyond endurance. I highly recommend this series to anyone who enjoys an author who respects her readers and seasons adventure with humor and warmth.

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  • Posted February 6, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    One of my favorites in this series

    Ramses' relationship with Nefret works itself out in this installment. And this is one of the better plots.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2004

    I absoulty Loved It!!

    This is my favorite Amelia Peabody Mystery! It had Everything. I was laughing my head off at Emerson and Ramses. And then the end, it was all I could have hoped for!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 2, 2002

    A+ for Elizabeth Peters on this book

    i really enjoyed he shall thunder in the sky, though it was the first book of the amelia peabody series that i ever laid my eyes upon, the plot kept me so into it that i never wanted to put it down!!! i also fell in love with Ramses and how he struggled to keep his feelings for Nefret hidden from everyone who didn't know what had happened between them in falcon at the portal i am currently trying to find and read all the books in the series

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 13, 2002

    Bring on More Ramses And Nefret

    I have all the books on Peabody BUT I Loved Ramses as a child and am really crazy for more of him and Nefret. Love Sethos too!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 13, 2001

    Amelia and the clan are BACK!!!

    For everyone who has been on pins and needles since 'Falcon at the Portal,' look out! The entire Emerson clan is back in the newest edition of their outrageous adventures. Prepare for the usual suspense, adventure, and of course romance. Fans of the old and new generation will be most pleased. Personally, I have been a huge fan and have read all twelve titles. 'He Shall Thunder In The Sky' is a wonderful book and lays certain controversies to rest. This is definitely Ms. Peters at her greatest. For all you Master Criminal fans, which myself am included prepare to see another side of the mysterious man we call Sethos. In short 'He Shall Thunder In The Sky' is a book that is not to be missed!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 21, 2001

    Together At Last

    I loved this book. Ihad been so disappointed at the plot direction taken in 'Falcon' where Nefret dumps Ramses and marries another. It was too Mills and Boonish. I'm glad the relationship was resolved in 'Thunder'. It was back to the good old mystery and I found it very exciting.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 26, 2001

    Great but Not Peters's Best

    These characters have become a part of my life. Amelia's humor and ladylike outrageousness have been the hallmark of the entire series. However, as the Emersons' children have grown up in the last two books, Amelia's centrality has been diminished. The plotting has become less inevitably woven, as we are carried from one crisis to another. Extraneous characters are intoduced, and the books' core characters, superbly drawn over several volumes, are less convincingly motivated than I have come to expect. The truth is, I feel that Barbara Michaels, Ms. Peters's romance-writing self, has intruded upon her far more sophisticated and engaging mystery-writing self. Unlike other readers, I want Ms. Peters to slow down and take her time with the next installment of the Emerson family's adventures. The series is precious to me.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2001

    Finally!! Waiting for the next !!

    Waiting for the next Amelia Peabody book is like waiting for a letter from an old friend, never disappointing , always appreciated. The Emerson's are so fully developed and fleshed that if I were to see them on the street, I would know them instantly.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 31, 2000

    Amazing

    I just finished my freshman year of high school when I began to read this amazing book. It was the first Peabody mystery I have read so I was a bit hesitant to read it. The reading was difficult if your not a strong reader, and give up easily, but I love egyptology and mysteries so I found my perfect match. With characters that you can almost call over for lunch, and a storyline that you imagine as a movie, He Shall Thunder In the Sky is the perfect book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 26, 2000

    Wonderful!

    I am never disappointed when I pick up the next account of the Emerson's adventures. This latest installment in the Amelia Peabody series leaves the reader breathless and wanting more. Many thanks to Elizabeth Peters for the hours of enjoyment. Please hurry with the next one . . .

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 25, 2000

    Thanks Kirsten 'AWESOME BOOK'

    This is a very good book. I would recomend this book to any person out there. I would like to thank my friend Kirsten O. for telling me about this book without her telling me of Elizabeth Peters, I would not have read such a good book.

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