He Was a Midwestern Boy on His Own

He Was a Midwestern Boy on His Own

by Bob Greene (2)
     
 

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Bob Greene walks Main Street, USA. The astonishing people he meets, the places he goes, and the things he sees are the subjects of his popular syndicated column, collected here in a volume of the very best of Bob Greene.

Whether he's writing about the man who wrote the hit song "Louie Louie," the bizarre meeting between Richard Nixon and Elvis Presley, the inventor

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Overview

Bob Greene walks Main Street, USA. The astonishing people he meets, the places he goes, and the things he sees are the subjects of his popular syndicated column, collected here in a volume of the very best of Bob Greene.

Whether he's writing about the man who wrote the hit song "Louie Louie," the bizarre meeting between Richard Nixon and Elvis Presley, the inventor who changed baseball, or the father and son whose annual one-on-one basketball shoot-out is a symbol of their love and of time's passage, Bob Greene shares stories in which we see ourselves. Filled with great empathy and insight that will evoke tears of laughter and sadness, these pieces are vintage Bob Greene, to be enjoyed and savored time and again.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
This collection of pieces culled from Greene's syndicated newspaper column, his ``American Beat'' feature in Esquire and his television material for ABC News Nightline is wildly uneven, with the best selections memorable indeed and the weakest, hackneyed and banal. The author is in top form in those essays calculated to bring a lump to the throat, like the story of a recovered leukemia victim working in a florist shop who put a personal note in a bouquet sent to a boy with leukemia, or Michael Jordan's kindness to a child who had been horribly abused. Others, such as an account of an obsessed fan worshiping a singing group long disbanded, miss the mark by far. Greene's talent, however, is not just for the sentimental: for example, his reportage of ``The Nixon-Presley Papers'' is hilarious. First serial to Reader's Digest. (Apr.)
Library Journal - Library Journal
Columnist Greene acknowledges in his new collection that he does not attempt to unravel the mysteries of momentous global events. Instead, he plies the waters of the mundane, relating the stories he finds there. He ranges from the off-the-wall (a 1970 exchange of letters between Elvis Presley and President Nixon) to troubling social comment (the male crowd in a bar gleefully firing water-filled automatic rifles at seminude women). At his best, however, he goes straight for the heart (a child's letter to her dead grandfather and a father's futile attempts to secure a job for his unemployed son). While he often deals with the seemingly trivial, Greene has a knack for revealing far greater truths. Recommended for all public libraries.-- Jim Burns, Pompano Beach City Lib., Fla.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780345376640
Publisher:
Random House Publishing Group
Publication date:
07/20/1992
Pages:
305
Product dimensions:
4.19(w) x 6.86(h) x 0.78(d)

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