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Head Hunters
     

Head Hunters

4.6 3
by Herbie Hancock
 

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With the funk flying from note one, Head Hunters proudly announced itself a contemporary jazz recording, one that acknowledged the impact of Sly and the Family Stone, Marvin Gaye, and the rich vein of early '70s R&B. Armed with an arsenal of electronic keyboards, and backed by a

Overview

With the funk flying from note one, Head Hunters proudly announced itself a contemporary jazz recording, one that acknowledged the impact of Sly and the Family Stone, Marvin Gaye, and the rich vein of early '70s R&B. Armed with an arsenal of electronic keyboards, and backed by a lean-and-mean electric bassist and drummer, Hancock reinvented his music: What counted now was the feel of a piece -- virtuoso improvisation could take a back seat. Such tracks as "Sly" (an homage to you-know-who), the electro-groove remake of Hancock's earliest success, "Watermelon Man," and the big hit "Chameleon" come on like sonic valentines to funk itself. The street-beat jazz of Head Hunters gave Hancock a new audience and established his lasting reputation for cutting-edge fusion.

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Stephen Thomas Erlewine
Head Hunters was a pivotal point in Herbie Hancock's career, bringing him into the vanguard of jazz fusion. Hancock had pushed avant-garde boundaries on his own albums and with Miles Davis, but he had never devoted himself to the groove as he did on Head Hunters. Drawing heavily from Sly Stone, Curtis Mayfield, and James Brown, Hancock developed deeply funky, even gritty, rhythms over which he soloed on electric synthesizers, bringing the instrument to the forefront in jazz. It had all of the sensibilities of jazz, particularly in the way it wound off into long improvisations, but its rhythms were firmly planted in funk, soul, and R&B, giving it a mass appeal that made it the biggest-selling jazz album of all time (a record which was later broken). Jazz purists, of course, decried the experiments at the time, but Head Hunters still sounds fresh and vital decades after its initial release, and its genre-bending proved vastly influential on not only jazz, but funk, soul, and hip-hop.

Product Details

Release Date:
03/25/1997
Label:
Sony
UPC:
0074646512326
catalogNumber:
65123
Rank:
8436

Tracks

  1. Chameleon
  2. Watermelon Man
  3. Sly
  4. Vein Melter

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Herbie Hancock   Primary Artist,Synthesizer,Piano,Keyboards,Electric Piano,Pipe,Vocals,Clavinet,ARP,fender rhodes,Soloist,Arp Odyssey
Bennie Maupin   Flute,Percussion,Bass Clarinet,Alto Flute,Saxophone,Soprano Saxophone,Tenor Saxophone,Wind,Multiple Reeds,Saxello
Bill Summers   Percussion,Conga,Drums,Tambourine,Multi Instruments,Balafon,Bottle,Surdo,Agogo,Shekere,Shakere,Gankogui,Log Drums,Cabasa,Hinedewho
Paul Jackson   Electric Bass,Marimbula
Paul Jackson   Bass,Electric Bass,Marimbas,Marimbula
Harvey Mason   Drums
Oren Waters   Vocals
Headhunters   Group

Technical Credits

Bob Belden   Executive Producer,Reissue Producer
Herbie Hancock   Producer,Liner Notes
Steven Berkowitz   Director,Reissue Series
Fred Catero   Engineer
Kevin Gore   Director,Reissue Series
Harvey Mason   Arranger
David Rubinson   Producer
John Snyder   Producer
Scott Thompson   Liner Notes
Jeremy Zatkin   Engineer
Vic Anesini   Engineer
Victor Moscoso   Art Direction,Cover Design
Cozbi Sanchez-Cabrera   Art Direction
Scott H. Thompson   Liner Notes
Randall Martin   Reissue Design
John Naatjes   Tape Vault Research,Tape Research
Jennifer Ebert   Packaging Manager

Customer Reviews

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Head Hunters 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
These guys really rock! This stuff is so funky, I don't think it gets much funkier than this.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago