Heal Pelvic Pain: The Proven Stretching, Strengthening, and Nutrition Program for Relieving Pain, Incontinence,& I.B.S, and Other Symptoms Without Surgery

Overview

Bronze Medal Winner of a 2009 National Health Information Award

Stop your pelvic pain . . . naturally!

If you suffer from an agonizing and emotionally stressful pelvic floor disorder, including pelvic pain, irritable bowel syndrome, endometriosis, prostatitis, incontinence, or discomfort during sex, urination, or bowel movements, it's time to alleviate your symptoms and start healing--without drugs or surgery. Natural cures, in the form of ...

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Heal Pelvic Pain: The Proven Stretching, Strengthening, and Nutrition Program for Relieving Pain, Incontinence,& I.B.S, and Other Symptoms Without Surgery

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Overview

Bronze Medal Winner of a 2009 National Health Information Award

Stop your pelvic pain . . . naturally!

If you suffer from an agonizing and emotionally stressful pelvic floor disorder, including pelvic pain, irritable bowel syndrome, endometriosis, prostatitis, incontinence, or discomfort during sex, urination, or bowel movements, it's time to alleviate your symptoms and start healing--without drugs or surgery. Natural cures, in the form of exercise, nutrition, massage, and self-care therapy, focus on the underlying cause of your pain, heal your condition, and stop your pain forever.

The life-changing plan in this book gets to the root of your disorder with:

  • A stretching, muscle-strengthening, and massage program you can do at home
  • Guidelines on foods that will ease your discomfort
  • Suggestions for stress- and pain-reducing home spa treatments
  • Exercises for building core strength and enhancing sexual pleasure
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780071546560
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill Professional Publishing
  • Publication date: 8/6/2008
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 50,473
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Amy Stein is the founder and premier practitioner of Beyond Basics Physical Therapy in New York City, specializing in pelvic floor dysfunction, pelvic pain, and manual therapy for men, women, and children. A well-recognized expert in her field, she lectures nationwide and has been interviewed for NBC, the New York Daily News, and www.ourgyn.com. Amy is a contributor to the medical textbook Female Sexual Pain Disorders: Evaluation and Management, and she serves on the board of the International Pelvic Pain Society. She lives in New York City.

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Read an Excerpt

Heal Pelvic Pain

A Proven Stretching, Strengthening, and Nutrition Program for Relieving Pain, Incontinence, IBS, and Other Symptoms Without Surgery
By AMY STEIN

McGraw-Hill

Copyright © 2009 Amy Stein
All right reserved.

ISBN: 978-0-07-154656-0


Chapter One

AT THE BODY'S CORE

Copyright © 2009 by Amy Stein. Click here for terms of use.

Say good-bye to your pelvic pain.

No matter how much it hurts, no matter how long you've suffered, no matter how many different pills you've taken or treatments you've undergone, the program in this book can help alleviate your pain or disorder and start the healing.

No drugs, no surgery. Instead, this is a program of natural healng—of exercises, massage, nutrition, and self-care therapies that will focus on the true underlying condition of your pain. Heal the condition, and your symptoms will go away—and that's just what the program in this book can help you achieve.

To start, I'll explain what pelvic floor disorder is, why doctors have trouble diagnosing it, why you may have had so much trouble treating it so far, and how you can feel better as quickly as possible.

The first thing you should know is that you are not alone. Of course, nobody likes to talk about bladder problems or painful sex or itching or burning in the genital region, so you may not hear or read much about pelvic floor disorders. But the truth is that millions of us suffer from these disorders—women and men, athletes and couch potatoes, young and old, even children.

Mostly, it's women who suffer. As I write this, 9.2 million women have pelvic floor disorder but don't know it because it has not been properly diagnosed. And the sad fact is that if you're a woman, you have at least a 5 percent chance of suffering chronic pelvic pain.

But your pain right now is what counts. That's why you're reading this book. You may be one of the more than 30 million women who have irritable bowel syndrome or one of the 700,000 with the urinary frequency, urgency, and pain that are collectively referred to as painful bladder syndrome or interstitial cystitis.

Maybe you suffer some form of incontinence, especially if you gave birth recently or exercise frequently.

Maybe you have some form of sexual dysfunction; 43 percent of women do. Pain during intercourse, performance problems, and declines in sexual response and enjoyment are all more common than you think. All can adversely affect your relationship with your partner. And all can be treated with the natural healing program in this book.

THE PELVIC FLOOR

What is the pelvic floor? Take a look at the figures. The pelvic floor is all the muscles, plus the nerves controlling the muscles, plus the tissues—called fascia—that connect everything together, plus the ligaments that link bone to bone and bone to organ that are attached to the front, back, and sides of the pelvis, from the pubic bone in the front of the body all the way back to the tailbone. These muscles, nerves, tissues, and ligaments sheathe the floor of the pelvis and together act like a sling or hammock to support the pelvic organs—the urinary tract, digestive tract, and reproductive organs—including the bladder, the uterus (or in men, the prostate), and the colon.

This is an essential part of your body's core, the center of gravity in your frame, the place where movement originates—in a sense, the seat of raw power in your body. Eastern religions attribute spiritual as well as physical significance to this part of the body, seeing it as the place where the vital energy of your life force resides.

In much of Hindu tradition, it is the coiled serpent of Kundalini, waiting to be awakened into energy. In Chinese culture, the pelvic floor is the home of ITLχITL, the life energy that must flow freely in our bodies in order for us to remain healthy. In Japanese martial arts, it is the hara, the vital center of the self—located just three fingers below the navel and three fingers inward toward the spine. The recognition of this vital life force is at the heart of spiritual practice in these traditions, and it is the focus of the physical exercises that invariably accompany such practices.

Western scientific research confirms that a strong and healthy pelvic floor at the core is essential to overall health and fitness. It's critical to feeling good. It's key to that sense of physical vigor that is so important to your sense of well-being.

THE MUSCLES OF THE PELVIC FLOOR

All the muscles of the pelvic floor work together to support the pelvic organs and to assist in bladder, bowel, and sexual function and with trunk stability and mobility. But each muscle also has its specific individual role.

As shown in Figures 1.3 and 1.4, the pelvic floor has two parts. The upper part (lightly shaded) comprises the superficial layers of the pelvic floor. The muscles here constitute the urogenital diaphragm, also known as the urogenital triangle because, as you can see, the muscles form a triangle. These muscles are the bulbocavernosus, ischiocavernosus, and the transverse perineum, all of which assist in orgasm and bladder control in both men and women.

The lower (darker-shaded) part of the pelvic floor, sometimes called the anal triangle contains all the other muscles of the pelvic floor, all of which are found in the deep layers of the pelvic sling. These muscles include the levator ani, the urethral and anal sphincters, and the coccygeus, piriformis, and obturator internus.

The levator ani muscle moves the coccyx or tailbone. It is made up of the pubococcygeus (an important muscle that assists in orgasm in men and women), the puborectalis, and the iliococcygeus (see Figures 1.3, 1.4, and 1.5). You won't see the puborectalis labeled in the illustrations because it is located beneath the pubococcygeus muscle. Both muscles originate at the pubic bone. The pubococcygeus attaches to the coccyx bone, or tailbone, and the puborectalis wraps around the rectum. The puborectalis assists in bowel emptying; therefore, if the puborectalis is tight or spasmed, this might result in incomplete or difficult bowel emptying.

The urethral and anal sphincter muscles assist in bladder and bowel function in men and women.

The obturator internus, coccygeus, and piriformis all work together but have slightly different roles (see Figure 1.5). The obturator internus is also a hip rotator and is the conduit for a very important nerve, the pudendal nerve, that helps control a great deal of pelvic floor function. A dysfunction in the obturator internus can therefore result in a slew of problems. The coccygeus muscle assists the levator ani muscles in moving the coccyx bone or tail-bone when the muscles are contracted. The piriformis, like the obturator internus, is also a hip rotator.

Experts in evolution theorize that the pelvic floor musculature once controlled the tails of our apelike ancestors, before hands proved to be more effective. Eventually, the use of hands naturally selected a new branch of evolutionary development. In that new branch, which eventually became us, the tails went away, but the muscles remained. Now, however, instead of controlling wagging and hanging from trees, the muscles took on the function of helping to support the body's core. So today, the evolved pelvic floor serves three vital purposes:

• It upholds and cushions the organs within the pelvis and lower abdomen: urinary organs, digestive organs, and reproductive organs.

• It controls continence by signaling elimination urges to the bladder and bowel and by opening and closing the urethra and anal canals to allow voiding.

• It is the mechanism of sexual function, contracting the muscles around the female and male genitalia to respond to arousal and to enhance appreciation.

These are big and important jobs, which may be why so many thick, closely connected muscles are involved. We can characterize these pelvic floor muscles in several ways.

First, they're voluntary muscles. That is, we control them consciously. This is different from the smooth muscles of the bladder, intestines, lungs, and blood vessels, which are involuntary; that is, they're controlled by our nervous systems in such a way that they operate automatically.

Second, the muscles of the pelvic floor are skeletal muscles. That means they are attached to the skeletal frame. When we contract the pelvic floor muscles, the energy of the contraction applies force to the tailbone.

The pelvic floor muscles also come in two "speeds." About 70 percent of the pelvic floor muscle fibers are slow-twitch or slow-contraction fibers; the rest are fast-twitch fibers.

Put simply, the slow-twitch muscle fibers fuel endurance. They're the marathoners of muscles, providing support and resisting fatigue. Think of the muscles in your lower back: they are mostly slow-twitch fibers that can work for a long time without tiring. That's essential, because these are the muscles responsible for helping keep you upright. The slow-twitch muscles that make up the bulk of your pelvic floor are that kind of slow-to-tire, persistently supportive muscles.

Fast-twitch fibers, by contrast, provide the quick forcefulness of sprinters. The muscles that move your eyes, for example, are fast-twitch muscles. In the pelvic floor, the fast-twitch muscles assist in controlling the contraction and relaxation that open and close the bladder and bowel and that serve the sexual function so essentially.

While both the slow-twitch and fast-twitch muscles lose strength as the body ages, the fast-twitch muscle fibers do so more readily. The slow-twitch muscles that make the pelvic floor a center of endurance and support tend to keep their power and function longer—unless there is trauma or injury. In a sense, the power to endure remains, while the power to perform some of the pelvic floor's key functions can diminish.

That's natural. As we get older, our powers diminish. That's why it's so important to stay as fit as we can for as long as we can; physical strength and vigor are the best defense against the aging process.

That's certainly true where the pelvic floor muscles are concerned. It's no exaggeration to say that a healthy pelvic core is a major component of a healthy you. For that reason, it's important to pay attention to any pelvic pain or disorder; it could be a signal that something may be wrong. And unfortunately, lots of things can go wrong.

PAIN AT THE CORE

Of course, anytime you have a mechanism as highly complex as the pelvic floor, with all those muscles, nerves, tissues, and ligaments holding all those organs and attached to all that bone, it's prone to things going wrong. Basically, however, there are four root causes of pelvic floor disorders: inflammation, infection, trauma, and a range of what we might term "mechanical" muscular conditions—and any number of contributing factors that set the causes in motion.

Any kind of chronic inflammatory condition in any of the pelvic organs can originate a disorder.

So can any kind of infection: urinary tract infection, yeast infection, bacterial infection, or a major disease that affects the area.

Certainly, an injury from an accident or fall can cause dysfunction. Surgery—a hysterectomy, prostatectomy, or Caesarean section—can leave the muscles weak or injured. And physical or sexual abuse may also produce harmful trauma.

But it's equally possible that an individual's pelvic floor disorder has been caused by simple weakness in the trunk and pelvic stabilizers. Or maybe the person's spine and pelvis are misaligned. The individual may simply have been born with these conditions; it's not uncommon to inherit a weak trunk or a spinal misalignment. Or the conditions could be a result of poor posture, excessive strain from heavy lifting or other physical activities, or working at a repetitive-motion job. It is possible that you are using the pelvic floor muscles incorrectly, resulting in incoordination of the muscles. All can overload and/or shorten the pelvic floor muscles. Such stress weakens the muscles and decreases their range of motion.

Moreover, it doesn't take much to throw a monkey wrench into the works and kick off a disorder in the pelvic floor. Something as common as childbirth can do it. So can wearing clothing that is too tight, sliding too hard into third base at the Fourth of July softball game, using the wrong over-the-counter treatment for a yeast infection, or even playing a wind instrument. Any or all of these triggering factors could lead to a spasm or weakness or impairment of the muscles, producing dysfunctions ranging from debilitating pain to irritable bowel syndrome to skin disorders to erectile dysfunction and/or lowered libido.

And here's the problem: precisely because the pelvic floor muscles are so closely interconnected, any kind of disorder anywhere in the pelvic floor can have an impact on any or all of the pelvic floor's other functions. You might strain a muscle during a gym workout and find that you are having a hard time fighting urinary urgency and a painful time having sex with your partner—all from a spasm suffered during spinning class!

This is the heart of the matter: one pelvic floor dysfunction may lead to another. And another. And still another. One disorder anywhere might therefore cause disabling pain, incontinence, urinary and bowel retention, and sexual dysfunction—often, all at once.

What's more, since the pelvic floor connects our upper and lower body, a dysfunction in the floor can, unfortunately, affect both upper and lower body. I've treated patients for pelvic floor disorder who then reported that their foot pain or back pain disappeared with the treatment. The reason? Pain from their pelvic floor had radiated downward or upward to affect these other areas of the body.

In fact, that's typical. All those muscles, nerves, tissues, and ligaments networked together in support of the pelvic organs simply turn into speedy highways for the pain from a pelvic floor dysfunction. What starts at the core is soon cascading every which way throughout your body. That's why so many people who suffer from a pelvic floor disorder feel a combination of symptoms, and it's why their suffering may not stop at the pelvic region.

And it's the main reason why pelvic floor disorder is rarely the first thing we think of for the range of symptoms the disorder can prompt. A case of diarrhea may send us to the Pepto Bismol bottle or the gastroenterologist. Vaginal pain prompts us to make an appointment with the gynecologist. And back pain is typically a signal to go see an orthopedist or lie down for a couple of days with some heat and ice.

The problem is compounded by the fact that once in the doctor's office, many pelvic floor disorders are often diagnosed as a problem in the organ. They feel like organ pain even if there's no infection there, and they can mimic organ disorders, so that's what doctors tend to treat, even though the pain is actually radiating out from a dysfunction in the muscle, tissue, nerve, ligament, or all of them.

Wherever it hurts, these dysfunctions can affect the quality of life in the most intimate arenas of life; at their worst, their impact can make the individual utterly miserable every minute of the day.

CONSEQUENCES OF PELVIC FLOOR DISORDERS

Think what can happen if the pelvic floor no longer performs its vital functions well. If the organs of the pelvis—reproductive organs, bladder, bowel—are not well supported against gravity and cushioned against pressure, they literally may begin to drop. As they sag, they fail to work properly, and pressure and pain may ensue. Incontinence may result. And finally, surgery may be required.

If the muscles that control the urges and openings for evacuation grow weak or are impaired, the result will be difficulty in either evacuating or retaining—or both. You'll experience strain, bloating, diarrhea, and abdominal and/or pelvic pain. You may suffer incontinence and a range of other urinary and bowel symptoms as well.

If the muscles that power sexual activity grow weak or are over-tensed, your ability to respond to your partner will be diminished—and so will your enjoyment and your partner's. At worst, if the tension is really bad, penetration may prove painful, even impossible, for the woman, while men may suffer pain following ejaculation.

ENDING THE PAIN, HEALING THE DISORDER

The whole subject of pelvic pain may be one you're uncomfortable talking about—to your partner, a friend, even to your doctor. Maybe you assumed that the pain or discomfort would subside, then go away in time. Or maybe you've decided it's just something you have to learn to live with.

No, you don't. In fact, you shouldn't.

(Continues...)



Excerpted from Heal Pelvic Pain by AMY STEIN Copyright © 2009 by Amy Stein. Excerpted by permission of McGraw-Hill. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Table of Contents

Part I. Healthy at the Core
Chapter 1. The Pelvic Floor
Chapter 2. The Healthy Pelvic Floor
Chapter 3. When the Pelvic Floor Is Not Healthy
Chapter 4. Sex
Part II. The Program: Strengthening the Pelvic Floor
Chapter 5. Your Pelvic Floor
Chapter 6. Stretch and Drop: The Key Combination for Your Core
Chapter 7. Strengthen and Tone the Muscles, Keep the Blood Flowing
Chapter 8. Putting it All Together
Chapter 9. Better Sex for More Years
Part III. The Program: Relax
Chapter 10. Letting Go
Chapter 11. Manage Stress
Part IV. The Program: Nutrition and Pampering for a Healthy Pelvic Floor
Chapter 12. Foods That Can Harm
Chapter 13. Foods That Can Help
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Sort by: Showing all of 13 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 18, 2008

    Easy Reading Selp Help for Pelvic Pain

    I found this book to be helpful and comprehensive. It answered a lot of questions that I couldn't get answers from my healthcare provider. It is easy to read and a great self-help book. The photos and illustrations are very helpful. I feel much better. I recommend this to anyone suffering from Pelvic Pain.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 9, 2008

    Pelvic Pain and Sexual Dysfunction

    I have been suffering from pain with intercourse, constipation and urinary burning and urgency for many years now. The doctors that I saw just kept saying that it was an infection and kept giving me antibiotics and other medications. I recently purchased this book and starting doing the exercises and massage techniques and right away I noticed an improvement. This book is an easy-read and informative self-help book. I highly recommend it and I even brought it to my Md's to show them that there is another solution besides medication.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 24, 2008

    Great book for patients and healthcare practicioners treating pelvic pain

    I am a physical therapist that not only works with patients with pelvic pain, but also educates physical therapists and other health care providers on the treatment of this condition. I recommend this book to all my students and patients as it gives a clear understanding of the underlying cause of this pain and how to actually heal this condition. Great book and great price!

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 1, 2012

    I Also Recommend:

    I found Amy's book while sitting at yet another Dr's office wait

    I found Amy's book while sitting at yet another Dr's office waiting to find out what was wrong with me. I picked it up while waiting for the Dr to return, and long story short went straight to the book store to pick up my own copy. Amy's book not only helps you understand what is happening with your body, it gives you the tools you need to manage your pain while you make it through to recovery. I am happy to say after about six months I am pain free. I was lucky enough to find an experienced PT in my area and I did PT at first twice a week and then down to once a week. Amy's book not only helped me to know if I was in good hands with my PT, but it also helped me to feel like I was in control of my healing. Her stretching routine seemed extensive at first, but in no time felt second nature and gave me some peace to look forward to everyday. I am convinced her stretches were a key element to my success. At first I did them a minimum of twice a day (three times if I could fit them in), as I started healing I tailored my routine to those stretches that seemed to target my problem areas.I now stretch about three times a week or when I start to feel symptoms. I highly recommend this book to anyone who wants a partner to get through a long journey. Healing pelvic pain is not something that can be rushed, Amy's book feels like a confidant you can rely on from start to finish. I am so grateful for Amy's dedication and for sharing her expertise. Seek the proper help, be patient and diligent and recovery will follow.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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