Healing the Mind: A History of Pyschiatry from Antiquity to the Present

Healing the Mind: A History of Pyschiatry from Antiquity to the Present

by Michael H. Stone, Stone
     
 

Long before the age of reliable psychodiagnosis (the last 200 years), a primitive vocabulary sprung up to address odd and unconventional people within the body social.
The history of psychiatry concerns efforts to identify, diagnose, and contain or treat these "wild," "mad," or "insane" people. This book starts with the Greeks 2,500 years ago and ends with a

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Overview

Long before the age of reliable psychodiagnosis (the last 200 years), a primitive vocabulary sprung up to address odd and unconventional people within the body social.
The history of psychiatry concerns efforts to identify, diagnose, and contain or treat these "wild," "mad," or "insane" people. This book starts with the Greeks 2,500 years ago and ends with a detailed look at current developments and trends.

Editorial Reviews

Allan Tasman
“This is a terrific book for psychiatrists at all stages of their careers as well as other professionals and lay readers interested in the historical antecedents of modern psychiatric practice.”
Library Journal
These two books show how far and fast the field of psychiatry has changed in recent times. In Healing the Soul, a comprehensive easy-to-scan survey intended as a student reference, Stone (The Fate of Borderline Patients, Guilford, 1990) chronicles the persons, movements, and events that have contributed to modern psychiatry. Starting with accounts of aberrant behavior in religious texts, he traces the diagnosis and treatment of mental illness from ancient Greece to present times. Culling from sources in philosophy, science, and sociology, he gives increased space to developments since 1900, covering such topics as hospital, forensic, and child psychiatry as well as psychopharmacology, genetics, and psychobiology. Stone not only uncovers obscure writing foreshadowing current trends, but acknowledges contributions from outside North America and includes recent ethnological and cross-cul tural considerations. For most collections. Scull (The Most Solitary of Afflictions: Madness and Society in Britain 1700-1900, Yale Univ., 1993) and his British collaborators focus on the profession of psychiatry in 19th-century Britain. Masters of Bedlam examines the lives and careers of seven "mad-doctors" who, in their writings, research, and political lobbying, were influential in changing the profession from a marginal medical field to a specialty with its own academic training, journals, and professional associations. Though well researched, the format of this work, a series of biographies, assumes a basic background knowledge of historical details. An introductory chapter or appendix (as in Stone's work) outlining pertinent scientific and political developments would give this book wider appeal. For academic libraries and medical history collections.Lucille Boone, San Jose P.L., Cal.
Booknews
A review of the history of psychiatry, describing major trends and profiling influential individuals in the field. Examines the role of religion in the development of psychiatry, and offers sections on the period through the 15th century, the 16th through 19th centuries, 1900-1959, the 1960s, and the 1970s. A final section covering 1980- 1996 looks at trends in areas such as psychoanalysis, hospital psychiatry, biological psychiatry, and forensic psychiatry. Includes a time line and a chronology. For students. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780393702224
Publisher:
Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
Publication date:
01/28/1997
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
516
Product dimensions:
7.70(w) x 9.60(h) x 1.20(d)

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