The Healing (Kentucky Brothers Series #2)

( 38 )

Overview

Now a New York Times and USA Bestseller! Seek a fresh start with Amish widower Samuel Fisher as he journeys from Lancaster County to Bluegrass Country, hoping to find a balm for the grief he’s carried with him. Will this single father, burdened by yesterday’s memories, discover a new and perhaps better life in Kentucky, the land of tomorrow? Esther Beiler, who helps watch Samuel’s children, develops a crush on Samuel and a true affection for his kids. Can she win his heart, or has she already lost it to an ...

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The Healing (Kentucky Brothers Series #2)

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Overview

Now a New York Times and USA Bestseller! Seek a fresh start with Amish widower Samuel Fisher as he journeys from Lancaster County to Bluegrass Country, hoping to find a balm for the grief he’s carried with him. Will this single father, burdened by yesterday’s memories, discover a new and perhaps better life in Kentucky, the land of tomorrow? Esther Beiler, who helps watch Samuel’s children, develops a crush on Samuel and a true affection for his kids. Can she win his heart, or has she already lost it to an English woman? How will God untangle star-crossed lovers when jealousies and misconceptions threaten to tear them apart?

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Editorial Reviews

Dr. J's Book Place

This is a warm and wonderful story of love that is lost, grief that must be endured, lives that must move on, caring and loving that can never afford to wane, and the healing power of prayer, support, friends, family, and one's devotion and faith in God.  Interwoven in Samuel and Esther's story is the continuation of Titus and Suzanne's courtship as Samuel's needs and concerns almost overwhelm their relationship and place some significant pressures on their future life together.  No matter what one's faith practice or belief, these stories set within the Amish context are so very readable, wonderfully entertaining, filled with graceful and loving people, and instructive as to an alternate way of approaching life's dilemmas.  They are the kind of stories we can proudly give to your teens and know that there is still real living involved without the dark and negative approach to problem-solving.  Add in the fact that this author has been engaging the interest of readers for years with over 85 published novels and you have a novel that is well worth the time and effort to read, is instructive and entertaining, and leaves the reader--me, anyway, feeling like I deeply satisfied. 

— Judith Hirsch-Fikejs

RT Book Reviews

The second in the Kentucky Brothers series, this book could stand alone.  A family tree is included to help with the characters.  In true Brunstetter fashion, rich details and plausible situations abound.  Though the narrative is somewhat predictable, it is an enjoyable read.

— Leslie L. McKee

Dr. J's Book Place - Judith Hirsch-Fikejs

This is a warm and wonderful story of love that is lost, grief that must be endured, lives that must move on, caring and loving that can never afford to wane, and the healing power of prayer, support, friends, family, and one's devotion and faith in God.  Interwoven in Samuel and Esther's story is the continuation of Titus and Suzanne's courtship as Samuel's needs and concerns almost overwhelm their relationship and place some significant pressures on their future life together.  No matter what one's faith practice or belief, these stories set within the Amish context are so very readable, wonderfully entertaining, filled with graceful and loving people, and instructive as to an alternate way of approaching life's dilemmas.  They are the kind of stories we can proudly give to your teens and know that there is still real living involved without the dark and negative approach to problem-solving.  Add in the fact that this author has been engaging the interest of readers for years with over 85 published novels and you have a novel that is well worth the time and effort to read, is instructive and entertaining, and leaves the reader--me, anyway, feeling like I deeply satisfied. 
RT Book Reviews - Leslie L. McKee

The second in the Kentucky Brothers series, this book could stand alone.  A family tree is included to help with the characters.  In true Brunstetter fashion, rich details and plausible situations abound.  Though the narrative is somewhat predictable, it is an enjoyable read.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781594153815
  • Publisher: Gale Cengage Learning
  • Publication date: 9/21/2011
  • Series: Kentucky Brothers Series , #2
  • Edition description: Large Print
  • Pages: 524
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

New York Times bestselling author, Wanda E. Brunstetter became fascinated with the Amish way of life when she first visited her husband's Mennonite relatives living in Pennsylvania. Wanda and her husband, Richard, live in Washington State but take every opportunity to visit Amish settlements throughout the States, where they have many Amish friends.
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Read an Excerpt

the Healing


By Wanda E. Brunstetter

BARBOUR PUBLISHING

Copyright © 2011 Wanda E. Brunstetter
All right reserved.

ISBN: 978-1-60260-683-8


Chapter One

Paradise, Pennsylvania

Alles is fix un faddich." Bishop Jacob Weaver clasped Samuel Fisher's shoulder and gave it a squeeze.

Samuel, who stood on his front porch with a few others from his community, gripped the railing so tightly his fingers ached. The last few days, and even now, he'd felt as if he were walking through a thick fog, barely able to hear what anyone had said to him. Yet the truth of the bishop's words—that all was completely done—slammed into Samuel with the force of a tornado. Overcome with emotion, he could barely manage a nod. They had just returned from the cemetery where they'd buried Elsie, his wife of ten years. He wasn't sure how he'd made it through the last couple of days, much less the funeral and graveside service, but frankly, he was too tired and too numb to care. Somehow, he was now expected to carry on without her, and that thought was overwhelming.

Samuel's mind hadn't rested since that awful day when he'd found his wife at the foot of the stairs. Over and over he kept asking himself, How do I go on? How can I survive without my Elsie? With his feelings so raw, he couldn't imagine where to begin. Constant thoughts and plaguing questions drained every bit of his energy.

Samuel realized he wasn't the first person to go through something like this, but even knowing that, all he felt was despair. The misery was more than he could bear. Well, he couldn't do it! The thought of caring for his and Elsie's four children and going to work every day was too much to think about. But if he didn't work, who would buy food and pay their bills?

And if he stayed home from work and wallowed in self-pity, he'd only be reminded of Elsie. Everywhere he looked, he would see her face: in the kitchen, where she'd prepared their meals; in the yard, where she'd worked among the flowers; in their bedroom, where she would take down her hair at night and allow him to brush her long, silky tresses as they discussed the day's events and all their plans for the future—a future that would no longer include his beloved Elsie.

"I'll let you visit with your family now, but please remember, you can call on me or any of the ministers in our church if you need anything. Oh, and no matter how sad you feel, take the time to read God's Word and pray, because being alone with God is the only way you will find the strength to press on." The elderly bishop, who'd been a friend of the family for a good many years, gave Samuel's shoulder another firm squeeze and walked away, leaving Samuel to his disturbing thoughts.

Was it only last week that he and Elsie had discussed the approach of Thanksgiving and the huge meal they planned to have? They'd smiled and laughed as they'd reminisced about last year's holiday with their children and several of Samuel's family members sitting around the table. Elsie had commented on how she loved to watch the children's eyes grow big as saucers when the mouth-watering turkey, almost overflowing the platter, had been set in the middle of the table. All the laughter and chatter while they'd enjoyed the holiday feast was a special time for them as a family. Abruptly, those holidays and everything else Samuel and Elsie had shared had come to a halt. How quickly things could change.

In an attempt to force his thoughts aside, Samuel stared into the yard. A cold wind had scattered the fallen leaves all about. The trees were bare and empty—just like Samuel's heart. He knew that some men who'd been widowed married within the first year of their wife's death, but Samuel was certain he would never marry again, for how could anyone fill the horrible void left by Elsie's untimely death?

He caught sight of his children playing in the yard with some other children as though nothing had happened. Of course, the little ones didn't understand that Elsie was never coming back, but he was sure eight-year-old Marla and six-year-old Leon did. So how could they frolic about as if they hadn't just witnessed their mother's coffin being lowered into the ground? Surely, they must miss her as much as Samuel did. Maybe the only way they could deal with it was to run and play, trying to block it all out. Samuel wished he could find a way to block out the pain.

He looked away and sank into a nearby chair with a groan. Nothing will ever be the same. I'll never be able to laugh with the children again. No more catching flies for their entertainment. No more walks in the woods, holding Elsie's hand. No more anything that used to be fun.

Samuel closed his eyes, and a vision of Elsie's twisted body lying at the bottom of the stairs came uninvited into his head. Would he ever be able to get that image out of his mind? Would he ever know peace again?

Marla and Leon had seen their mother fall that day, and when Samuel rushed into the house after hearing their screams, he'd found them close to her body, sobbing and pleading with her to open her eyes. The two youngest children—four-year-old Penny and two-year-old Jared—he'd discovered in the kitchen, hiding behind the stove. Even before the paramedics arrived, Samuel had known Elsie was dead. He'd found no pulse, and she wasn't breathing. Later, Samuel learned that Elsie had suffered a broken neck from the fall, as well as severe internal injuries. Their unborn baby, still underdeveloped in his mother's womb, had also perished.

"Samuel, you shouldn't be sitting out here in the cold by yourself."

Samuel's eyes snapped open. When he looked up and saw his older sister, Naomi, looking down at him with concern, he mumbled, "Didn't realize I was alone, and I'm too numb to feel the cold."

Naomi seated herself in the chair beside him. "I feel your pain, Samuel. I truly do."

Samuel stared straight ahead. "How can you feel my pain? Your husband's still alive, and you've never lost a child—not even one who wasn't fully formed."

"I realize that, but I hurt with you, and I want to help ease your pain."

"There's nothing you can do."

She reached for his hand and gave his fingers a gentle squeeze. He could see the depth of Naomi's concern in her ebony-colored eyes. "God loves you, Samuel, and so do I."

"If God loves me, He wouldn't have taken Elsie away from me and the kinner," Samuel whispered, as the bitter taste of bile rose in his throat.

"Zach was unfairly taken from our family when he was a boppli, but it didn't mean God no longer loved us."

"That was different. Zach didn't die; he was kidnapped." Samuel pointed to the front door, where Zach and the rest of their family had gathered inside after the funeral dinner. "Zach came back to us. Elsie's gone from this earth forever."

"Her body's gone, but she was a Christian in every sense of the word, and I'm certain that her spirit lives on in heaven," Naomi said softly. "Someday you'll see her again."

"Someday could be a long time from now." Samuel swallowed hard, fighting to keep his emotions under control. "I wish it had been me who'd died. Why didn't God take me instead of Elsie?"

"You mustn't say such things. Your kinner need you now more than ever."

Samuel lowered his gaze to the porch floor. "They needed their mamm, and I can't take care of them without her."

"You don't have to, Samuel. God will see you through this. With the help of your family and friends, you'll make it."

Samuel rose to his feet, trying hard not to let the fear and loneliness he felt at the very core of his soul overtake him. "I can't talk about this right now. I need to be alone." Taking the porch steps two at a time, he hurried into the yard. He was halfway to the barn when his older brother, Norman, stepped up to him. "Are you okay, Samuel?"

"How can I be okay when Elsie's gone?" Just saying those words were hard enough, making him wish it was all just a horrible dream.

Norman's brown eyes became glassy as he put his hand on Samuel's shoulder and gave it a reassuring squeeze. "You have to accept her death as God's will. It's the only way you'll get through this."

Samuel's face heated, despite the chilly air. "What would you know about it? Your fraa's not dead!" He shrugged Norman's hand away and stormed across the yard. It was easy for Norman to say such words when he'd never experienced the pain of losing his wife. Yet Samuel knew that his brother meant well, and if the tables were turned, he'd probably have tried to offer comfort to him in much the same way.

As Samuel moved on, he heard his brothers Jake and Titus, who stood outside the barn, talking about the upcoming Thanksgiving holiday.

"I wish I could stay and join you for the holiday," Titus said, "but we have a lot of orders that need to be filled in the woodshop before Christmas, so Suzanne, Allen, and I will have to head back to Kentucky tomorrow morning."

"It's good you could come for the funeral," Jake said. "I'm sure it made it easier for Samuel to have his whole family here."

My whole family's not here. Elsie was my family, and she's not here. Samuel's fingers clenched as he hurried his steps. When he entered the barn moments later, he was greeted by the soft nicker of the horses in their stalls. He dropped to a seat on a bale of straw and stared vacantly at Elsie's horse, Dolly, standing in one of the stalls, her head hanging over the gate. Did the mare know Elsie was gone? Did she miss her, too? He'd have to sell the horse now. If he kept the mare, he'd think of Elsie and be reminded that she would never hitch Dolly to the buggy again. Every waking hour, his thoughts were like a roller coaster, reflecting back over the ten years they'd been married. He wasn't ready to let go—he wanted to think about nothing but the memories they'd made together. But then his thinking would jump ahead, trying to imagine his life without Elsie. It was too much, too hard to grasp. For the last three days, he'd been falling into a fitful sleep at night, and finally, when he succumbed to exhaustion, it would be dawn. Mornings, he found, were the worst: his mind came to full alert, yet he still felt fatigued when he forced himself out of bed. He'd pace the floor, a million questions swimming in his head, wondering, Where do I go from here? Will I always feel this restless and unsure?

Halting his thoughts, Samuel noticed several pieces of hay falling through cracks in the loft above and was reminded of all the chores he had to catch up on. His pitchfork lay on the floor, where he'd dropped it the day he'd heard his children's screams that their mamm had fallen down the stairs.

A cat sprang down from the loft, and Samuel jumped. Purring softly, it rubbed its side against Samuel's legs. Elsie loved their cats, and they knew it. "Here, kitty, kitty" was all she had to yell, and the critters would come running, knowing their bowls had been filled. To Samuel, they were just plain old barn cats, good for only one thing—to keep the mice down. Elsie, though, loved all the farm animals and had a special way with them.

The barn door squeaked open and then clicked shut. Samuel looked up and saw Titus step inside. "I saw you come in here," Titus said. "I wanted to talk to you alone and thought this might be a good time."

"What'd you want to say?" Samuel asked. Truly, he just wanted to sit by himself for a spell, without interruption, but he didn't want to be rude—especially when his brother had come all the way from Kentucky to attend Elsie's funeral.

Titus took a seat on the bale of straw next to Samuel. "I'm real sorry about Elsie. It was a shock to hear that she'd died, and I know you and the kinner are really going to miss her." His dark brown eyes looked as sorrowful as the somber expression on his face.

Samuel, not trusting his voice, could only nod.

They sat for several minutes in silence until Titus spoke again. "If you ever feel the need for a change, I want you to know that you'd be welcome in Kentucky. I'd be pleased to have you stay with me for as long as you want."

"Me moving from here won't bring Elsie back." Samuel knew he sounded bitter, but he couldn't help it.

"'Course not, but it would give you a new start. Maybe that's what you need." Titus leaned closer to Samuel. "Moving to Kentucky helped my wounded heart to heal after Phoebe and I broke up."

Samuel shrugged. "I'll give it some thought, but right now I just need to be alone." He couldn't imagine how moving to Kentucky could help his broken heart. Besides, his situation wasn't anything like Titus's.

"Okay, I'll head back to the house now, but remember, brother, I love you." Titus gave Samuel's arm a light tap and slipped quietly from the barn.

Dolly whinnied, and Samuel's vision blurred from the tears burning his eyes. Oh, Elsie, I'll never love anyone but you. Sweet Elsie, I'll always miss you. He lowered his head into his hands and let the tears flow freely.

* * *

Pembroke, Kentucky

As Esther Beiler stood beside her mother at the counter near the front of their store, she sensed that something was wrong. Mom had been acting kind of strange all morning, as though a heavy burden lay on her heart. Esther had been tempted to ask what was wrong but figured if Mom wanted to talk about it, she would. Besides, they'd been busy with customers all morning.

"How long does Dad plan to be in Hopkinsville today?" Esther asked as she reached for a tablet and pen to start a list of supplies they needed for the store.

"Just long enough to run a few errands." Mom's dark brown eyes looked lifeless, as though she hadn't been getting enough sleep, and Esther couldn't help but notice the dark circles beneath her eyes.

The bell above the front door jingled, and Verna Yoder entered the store. "Brr ..." she said, stepping up to the counter. "it's downright cold out there today. Bet it won't be long until we see some snow."

"I hope not." Mom shook her head. "I'm just not ready for windere yet."

"Well, like it or not, Dinah, winter's on the way. I can feel it in my bones." Verna rubbed her hands briskly over her arms, hidden beneath her black woolen shawl.

"Have you heard anything from Suzanne since she and Titus left for Pennsylvania?" Esther asked, curious to know when her best friend might be coming home.

Verna gave a nod. "She called when they first got there, and then I discovered another message from her this afternoon."

"How are things going for Samuel and his family?" Mom asked.

"Not so well," Verna replied. "Suzanne said Samuel's taking his wife's death pretty hard, which of course is to be expected. The poor man didn't even want to talk to most of the folks who'd come to the house after Elsie's funeral. Suzanne said Titus was going to suggest that Samuel and his kinner move here."

"What? After just losing his fraa?" Mom clicked her tongue noisily. "I'm surprised Titus would even suggest such a thing."

"I'm sure he meant well," Esther was quick to say. "He probably thought it would be good for Samuel to get a new start—go someplace where there aren't so many painful memories." Esther didn't know why she felt the need to defend Titus. It wasn't like he was her boyfriend or anything. The short time they'd courted after Titus had first moved to Kentucky hadn't amounted to anything more than friendship. Now he planned to marry Suzanne, which made Esther happy, because she knew Suzanne and Titus were very much in love and seemed well-suited for each other.

"I think it might be good for Titus's brother to move to Kentucky," Verna said. "Look how well Titus has done here. Everyone can see how happy he and my daughter are when they're together."

"You do have a point," Mom said. "Guess we'll just have to see whether Samuel accepts Titus's invitation, and if he does, only time will tell how well it will go."

Verna smiled. "Well, I'd best get what I came here for." she turned and headed down the aisle where the cleaning supplies were kept.

Sometime later after Verna had left the store, Mom turned to Esther and said, "There's something I need to tell you."

(Continues...)



Excerpted from the Healing by Wanda E. Brunstetter Copyright © 2011 by Wanda E. Brunstetter. Excerpted by permission of BARBOUR PUBLISHING. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 38 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(25)

4 Star

(6)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(3)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 38 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 13, 2011

    Must read!

    Another typical amazing Amish story by Wanda Brunstetter. Excellent questions at the end of the book for discussions.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 1, 2013

    Empty room

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 7, 2012

    A great and interessting book

    I have read a lot of books about the Amish but this is one of the best I have enjoyed.
    I try and read them according to the Series ao I would recommend that you read the 1st in the Series, then you get the full story.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 23, 2012

    Much better written than the first one!

    Whereas the amish family traditions were surprisingly lacking in this series, it was more gripping than the first book! I am disappointed in the author

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 30, 2012

    I normally like Wanda B. but, frankly, I'm so disappointed in th

    I normally like Wanda B. but, frankly, I'm so disappointed in this book. There are Amish inaccuracies and the conversation is so unreal that I cringe reading it. It really seems like this was tossed together with a predictable, cookie-cutter storyline that is completely unoriginal. Has one of the mistresses of Amish fiction become such a machine that the joy of writing has left the process? I sure hope not. I don't know if I'll finish it...

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 8, 2012

    Wonderful book.

    This is a wonderful book. I would recommend to anyone that enjoys reading about the Almish.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 22, 2012

    Loved It!!

    I love this author. Another great selection from an amazing author.

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  • Posted November 28, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Another great read for Amish fiction fans

    For long time fans of Amish fiction, its easy to see why Wanda Brunstetter is a New York Times best selling author and considered a "founder" of this genre. With close to 50 books and over 5 million copies sold, Wanda has definitely captured the hearts of her readers.

    The Healing is the second book in the Kentucky Brothers series and continues the story of Samuel Fisher who has recently lost his wife. Left alone to raise his children, Samuel is emotionally numb, overcome with grief and basically going through the motions. He distances himself from his children and his family around him and seems to be intent on pushing away those that love him and want to help him. Samuel is so caught up with his own loss, that he doesn't recognize his children are grieving too.

    Samuel's brother, Titus Fisher, takes in Samuel and his children with the hopes of giving them all a fresh start. However, Titus's good intentions quickly begin to go awry and the complications of taking in family start to strain Titus's relationship with his fiance'.

    This book has many characters from the previous book, so I do suggest reading the series in order if you want to have a good understanding of the family history and dynamics.

    Overall, this is a book about the struggles families face when they experience the tragedy of losing a loved one and how everyone processes grief differently.

    The third book in this series (The Struggle) is due out fall of 2012.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 29, 2011

    highly recommended

    Wanda has given us another great book

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  • Posted October 2, 2011

    Great 2nd book in the series- go grab a copy and read it.

    I enjoyed this second book and only disapointment is that I have to wait so long for the 3rd book. The 1st and 2nd "Kentucky Brothers" books are very heartwarming and inspiring to read. I really enjoy reading a book that is positive and faith inspiring.

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  • Posted October 1, 2011

    Great book, MUST READ

    The healing is the second book to the Kentucky Brothers. In this book Titus and Suzanne get married, Samuel loses his wife Elsie and becomes very depressed because he also lost the baby she was carrying. To trying get away from the reminders of his wife he moves in with Titus in Kentucky. This was very hard on his step mother. It takes a tragedy to get him to pull out of his depression and realize his kids are his life and he needs to care for them. In the end he falls in love with Esther, Suzanne's best friend. This book along with the first one was so good. Then again every book of Wanda's is great. I cannot wait to read the 3rd book of the series.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 22, 2011

    Not received

    I can't review a book if I haven't received it.
    Cancel this book.

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  • Posted September 14, 2011

    Another Great Read!

    The Healing is the second book in the Kentucky Brothers series. Samuel Fisher is grieving over the death of his wife Elsie. Grief has such a grip on him that he doesn't realize how much he is neglecting his children who are hurting too. Samuel and his children move to Kentucky to start a new life. His brother Titus has invited him to move in with him until Samuel gets on his feet. This book also centers around other characters such as Esther Beiler, Bonnie Taylor, and Allen Walters. It is a book that I could not put down. It gathers you in from page one and builds from there. I felt I was right there in Pembroke, Kentucky with them. I could feel God's leading in this story. I could feel God's healing from grief. Most of all I could feel God's love for whatever our trials and tribulations take us through. I urge you to pick up a copy of The Healing. I promise, you won't be disappointed. I once again thank my God for talented Christian authors like Wanda Brunstetter.

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  • Posted September 5, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Samuel moves to Kentucky

    I have read the first book in the series and as this one starts Samuel Fisher had just buried his young wife and unborn baby. He had four more children to raise now by himself and he just could not see how he was going to make it without his sweet Elsie. He got into such a state of depression that he didn't even pay any attention to his own children.

    He decided to move to Kentucky where his brother Titus lived and see if he could start over. He did get work but still was very depressed. He found a young woman the friend of Titus's girlfriend that would care for his children when he worked. Esther's parents had moved back to Pennsylvania to help their son that had been diagnosed with MS.

    Another young woman "Bonnie" from Organ had come to Pembroke Kentucky for her grandmother's funeral and found out that everything that had belonged to her grandmother was left to her including the old home. She decided to move there and use the old house as a bed-and-breakfast. She didn't get alone with her father at home since her mother had passed away. She is not Amish but made a lot of friends among the Amish community.

    Will Samuel find peace at last or will he still stay true to his late wife. Bonnie had a secret of her own so when will she let anyone know about her past life.

    Another great book written by one of the best Amish authors. I was so thrilled when I received it in the mail last week, by the request of Wanda E Brunstetter and Barbour Publishing in order for me to read and post a review.

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  • Posted September 5, 2011

    Highly Recommend

    The Healing by Wanda E Brunstetter is book 2 of the Kentucky Brothers series. It is a wonderful story of Love,grief,caring, and healing power pf prayer. It is well worth your time and effort to read. The Family tree included really helps with the characters. The story was enjoyable.

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  • Posted August 22, 2011

    Boring...

    This is the second book in the Kentucky Brothers series. Samuel sinks into despair after losing his wife and unborn child. He feels he must get away from PA. and the home they had shared so he uproots his family and moves to Kentucky to be near his brother, Titus.

    Shortly after settling into his brothers home he meets Esther, a young Amish woman. Hiring her to care for his children while he works he begins to have feelings for her but a promise he made to his wife stops him from courting her and he decides to move back to PA to escape Esther. However, something happens before he can move.

    This book, like the first one, is predictable. There are no surprises, the characters are simple, the writing style is dull and tiresome. Quite a boring book.

    I received an e-copy of this book from the publisher free in exchange for my honest review.

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  • Posted August 11, 2011

    Loved this book!!

    I have always loved reading Brunstetter's books, and was not disappointed with this one! I will admit, I seem to have a fascination with the Amish, even though they are bountiful in my area.

    I loved the relationships that developed between Esther and Samuel's kinner, she truly had their best interest at heart, no matter what the occasion. Esther and Samuel both have some trials in the beginning, but if they can just come together, things may work out.

    Samuel's family though, including his bruder Titus, all seem to have their own issues, and boy, some of them are big ones! While reading bits and pieces about Timothy and his frau Hannah, I can only imagine where there story will go! In my opinion, no spoiler here, his Mother-in-law may be their biggest problem!

    Would I recommend this book? Jah, I would. It is a wunderbar gut read! I give this book 5 stars!

    Translations(vary depending on region/dialect):
    Frau=Wife
    Kinner=Child/Children
    Bruder=Brother
    Jah=Yes
    Gut=Good
    Wunderbar=Wonderful

    Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Net Galley Publishers as part of their Blogger Review Program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own.

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  • Posted August 8, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    A Fine Amish read

    Well here's the thing, there are times when I have favorites at a certain restaurant- you know like every time I head down to that one place down by the water I have to get the Chocolate Peanut Butter milkshake (that is to die for) because it's delicious and it's my favorite, so I know exactly what I am going to get. It can be a good thing to know exactly what you are going to get ahead of time if that's exactly what you want or it can be a little bit repetitive depending on your take of what you are consuming. I'll let you decide for yourself. "The Healing" by Wanda Brunstetter opens with Samuel Fischer, a young Amish father burying his beloved wife Elsie after she suffered an accident falling down her stairs. She also took with her their unborn child. So you can imagine the grief that Samuel and his four young children are dealing with. In that grief Samuel up and moves his kids to Pembroke Kentucky with the hopes that it will be easier on Samuel to manage his grief as he won't be thinking of Elsie every minute of every day. He is a truly saddened man and finding it very difficult to take care of his children while simultaneously trying to start his life over. With his brother Titus living in Kentucky, he makes the break and moves himself and 4 young children into his home in Pembroke so he can have some help with his "kinners". This story is all about Samuel's "healing" as the title alludes to. He is able to find work from a young woman who has just moved to Kentucky herself as she is refurbishing an old home that belonged to her recently deceased Grandmother into a B&B. Samuel is helping with the painting and renovations. His 4 young children are being watched during the day by Esther Beiler, a young unmarried Amish woman that is just as sweet as can be and the children quickly fall for her kind ways as well as excellent cooking skills. Esther quickly falls for Samuel, but with Samuel still enveloped in his massive grief, it takes a while for him to come around. He is able to throw himself into his work, but is sadly lacking with all of his relationships around him, children, etc. On the whole I would say that I enjoyed this story. Honestly, it felt very similar to the first novel in this series-, The Journey, so it was starting to feel a little "formula writing" to me. Boy moves to Kentucky- doesn't notice girl at first at all as he is still getting over previous girl, starts to come around, crisis happens and he pulls back and then comes around and happy ending. So if you don't mind that both stories are rather similar then you will enjoy this book just as much as the first one. For me it was just a bit repetitive, that's all. That being said, it was a sweet Amish love story, good scriptural truths and charming Amish characters. If you are a fan of Wanda Brunstetter's Amish fiction series, I think you will enjoy this book. 3 stars. A digital copy of The Healing was provided for me from the Publisher through the Netgalley program. This was in exchange for a an honest review. All opinions expressed were my own.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 25, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 24, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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