Health Care Information Systems: A Practical Approach for Health Care Management / Edition 3

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Overview

This most widely used textbook in the field has been thoroughly revised and updated to reflect changes in the health care industry and the renewed focus on health care information technology initiatives. Two new chapters cover Federal efforts to enhance quality of patient care through the use of health care information technology and strategy considerations. Additionally, reflecting the increased focus on global health, the book features an international perspective on health care information technology. Case studies of organizations experiencing management-related information system challenges have been updated and several new cases have been added. These reality-based cases are designed to stimulate discussion among students and enable them to apply concepts in the book to real-life scenarios. The book's companion Web site features lecture slides, a test bank, and other materials to enhance students' understanding.

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Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Katie Dejuras, RN, MSN (Northwestern Memorial Hospital)
Description: This useful reference offers a thorough overview of the history and evolution of healthcare information systems and how they are managed, as well as their purpose, functions, and key attributes. It also highlights the value of information systems and barriers to adoption in healthcare. Readers will benefit from the learning activities and case studies in each chapter, where they will be able to apply the knowledge that they have gained. This is an update of a 2005 edition.
Purpose: According to the authors, the purpose is to prepare future healthcare executives with the knowledge and skills they need to manage information systems technology effectively in this new environment. There is a need for a book like this as the demand for information systems in healthcare has increased, especially in light of legislation as a result of numerous studies demonstrating their value through improvement of quality, outcomes, safety, efficiency, productivity, cost reduction, services, and satisfaction.
Audience: The authors wrote this book with graduate students or upper-level graduates enrolled in healthcare management programs in mind. However, it is a useful resource for anyone in healthcare management, whether an executive, manager, consultant, supplier, or student. Two of the authors are academics with impressive experience in teaching healthcare information management and the third is a chief information officer at one of the most prominent hospital systems in the U.S.
Features: This book provides sound information system definitions, which are helpful as these key terms are often used in different contexts. It highlights the value of information systems, as well as the barriers to them in healthcare, explaining the lag in healthcare information technology adoption. It explains how information systems are managed, as well as their purpose, functions, and key attributes such as the electronic medical record and CPOE. References in the system implementation and support chapter, such as the Ten Commandments for effective clinical decision support as referenced by Bates, are helpful when planning to implement a system. The learning activities and case studies allow readers to apply their knowledge in a real-life setting. The index is a useful guide to topics of interest.
Assessment: This is a useful resource, especially at this crucial point in time. Healthcare information system adoption is a complex topic and is not an easy one to address. Healthcare organizations are all faced with the same types of barriers (i.e. financial, organizational, behavioral, and/or technical) and this is a useful guide to the tools they need to potentially overcome these barriers. This second edition highlights the challenges of IT implementation and reminds readers to be cognizant of not only the financial costs of health information system implementation, but more importantly the process costs and the challenges they will face to adoption by end users.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781118173534
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 8/12/2013
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 3
  • Pages: 736
  • Sales rank: 72,625
  • Product dimensions: 7.00 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 1.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Karen A. Wager, DBA, is professor and associate dean for student affairs in the College of Health Professions at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC). She currently serves on the Accreditation Council for the Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Management Education (CAHME) and is a past Fellow of CAHME.

Frances Wickham Lee, DBA, is professor and director of instructional operations for Healthcare Simulation South Carolina at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC). She is a member of a pioneering team charged with bringing health care simulation to students and practicing professionals across the state of South Carolina.

John P. Glaser, PhD, is chief executive officer (CEO) of the Health Services Business Unit of Siemens Healthcare, where he is responsible for heading Siemens' global health care IT business. He previously was vice president and chief information officer, Partners HealthCare, Inc. Glaser was the founding chairman of the College of Healthcare Information Management Executives (CHIME), and is the former chairman of the eHealth Initiative Board and the Board of the National Alliance for Health Information Technology.

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Table of Contents

Tables, Figures, and Exhibits xi

Foreword xv

Preface xix

Acknowledgments xxxi

The Authors xxxiii

Part 1 Health Care Information 1

1 Introduction to Health Care Information 3

Learning Objectives

Types of Health Care Information

Internal Data and Information: Patient Specific—Clinical

Internal Data and Information: Patient Specific—Administrative

Internal Data and Information: Patient Specific—Combining Clinical and Administrative

Internal Data and Information: Aggregate—Clinical

Internal Data and Information: Aggregate—Administrative

Internal Data and Information: Aggregate—Combining Clinical and Administrative

External Data and Information: Comparative

External Data and Information: Expert or Knowledge Based

Summary

Key Terms

Learning Activities

2 Health Care Data Quality 49

Learning Objectives

Data versus Information

Problems with Poor-Quality Data

Ensuring Data and Information Quality

Summary

Key Terms

Learning Activities

3 Health Care Information Regulations, Laws, and Standards 67

Learning Objectives

Licensure, Certification, and Accreditation

Patient Safety Organizations

Legal Aspects of Managing Health Information

Summary

Key Terms

Learning Activities

Part 2 Health Care Information Systems 101

4 History and Evolution of Health Care Information Systems 103

Learning Objectives

Definition of Terms

History and Evolution

Summary

Key Terms

Learning Activities

5 Clinical Information Systems 133

Learning Objectives

The Electronic Health Record

Other Major HCIS Types

Fitting Applications Together

Overcoming Barriers to Adoption

Summary

Key Terms

Learning Activities

6 Federal Efforts to Enhance Quality of Patient Care through the Use of Health Information Technology 179

Learning Objectives

HITECH Act

Health Care Reform: New Modes of Care and Payment Reform

Health Information Exchange

Information Technology Ramifications of New Models of Care and Payment Reform

Summary

Key Terms

Learning Activities

7 System Acquisition 209

Learning Objectives

System Acquisition: A Definition

Systems Development Life Cycle

System Acquisition Process

Project Management Tools

Things That Can Go Wrong

Summary

Key Terms

Learning Activities

8 System Implementation and Support 241

Learning Objectives

System Implementation Process

Managing the Organizational Aspects

System Support and Evaluation

Summary

Key Terms

Learning Activities

Part 3 Information Technology 271

9 Technologies That Support Health Care Information Systems 273

Learning Objectives

Information Technology Adoption Challenges

Data Management and Access

Networks and Data Communications

Information Distribution Schemes

Remote Access Technologies

Internet and Web Concepts and Applications

E-Commerce in Health Care

Clinical and Managerial Decision Support

Information Systems Architecture

Summary

Key Terms

Learning Activities

10 Health Care Information System Standards 317

Learning Objectives

Standards Development Process

Classification Standards

Vocabulary and Terminology Standards

Health Record Content and Functional Standards

Summary

Key Terms

Learning Activities

11 Security of Health Care Information Systems 351

Learning Objectives

The Health Care Organization’s Security Program

Threats to Health Care Information

Overview of the HIPAA Security Rule

Outline of the HIPAA Security Rule

HITECH Expansion of the HIPAA Security Rule

Administrative Safeguards

Physical Safeguards

Technical Safeguards

Security in a Wireless Environment

Remote Access Security

Summary

Key Terms

Learning Activities

Part 4 Senior Management IT Challenges 393

12 Organizing Information Technology Services 395

Learning Objectives

Information Technology Functions

Organizing IT Staff and Services

In-House versus Outsourced IT

Evaluating IT Effectiveness

Summary

Key Terms

Learning Activities

13 IT Alignment and Strategic Planning 437

Learning Objectives

IT Planning Objectives

Overview of Strategy

Vectors for Arriving at IT Strategy

The IT Asset

A Normative Approach to Developing Alignment and IT Strategy

IT Strategy and Alignment Challenges

Characteristics of Strategic Thinking

Summary

Key Terms

Learning Activities

14 Strategy Considerations 467

Learning Objectives

Complementary Strategies

Strategy Evolution

Governing Concepts

The Competitive Value of IT

Summary

Key Terms

Learning Activities

15 IT Governance and Management 491

Learning Objectives

IT Governance

IT Effectiveness

IT Budget

Summary

Key Terms

Learning Activities

16 Management’s Role in Major IT Initiatives 521

Learning Objectives

Managing Change Due to IT

Managing IT Projects

Understanding IT Initiative Failures

Summary

Key Terms

Learning Activities

17 Assessing and Achieving Value in Health Care Information Systems 555

Learning Objectives

Definition of IT-Enabled Value

The IT Project Proposal

Steps to Improve Value Realization

Why IT Fails to Deliver Returns

Analyses of the IT Value Challenge

Summary

Key Terms

Learning Activities

18 Health IT Leadership: A Compendium of Case Studies 595

Appendixes

A. Overview of the Health Care IT Industry 641

B. Sample Project Charter 653

C. International Adoption and Use of Health Information Technology 665

Index 681

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