Health Measurement Scales: A practical guide to their development and use / Edition 4

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Overview

Clinicians and those in health sciences are frequently called upon to measure subjective states such as attitudes, feelings, quality of life, educational achievement and aptitude, and learning style in their patients. This fourth edition of Health Measurement Scales enables these groups who often have limited knowledge of statistics, to both develop scales to measure non-tangible health outcomes, and better evaluate and differentiate between existing tools.

It covers how the individual items are developed; various biases that can affect responses (eg social desirability, yea-saying, framing); various response options; how to select the best items in the set; how to combine them into a scale; and then how to determine the reliability and validity of the scale. It concludes with a discussion of ethical issues that may be encountered, and guidelines for reporting the results of the scale development process. Appendices include a comprehensive guide to finding existing scales, and a brief introduction to exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. It synthesizes the theory of scale construction with practical advice, making it the ultimate guide to how to develop and validate measurement scales that are to be used in the health sciences.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"This book continues to be a valuable reference book for researchers interested in the intricacies and nuances of scale development and evaluation. The authors present a broad, informative approach, and do so in a humorous and interesting manner, making this book an enjoyable book to read."—Journal of Biopharmaceutical Statistics

"The purpose is to provide a resource to researchers in the health science on the subject of measurement. The book succeeds (as did prior editions) in covering aspects of psychosocial measurements with relevant health-related examples....The authors have added new material and expanded other material in important ways since the first edition. While all chapters are useful, the updated discussion of validity and the new secion on G-theory will stand out as important references for readers."—Doody's

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: James C. Torner, PhD, MS (University of Iowa College of Public Health)
Description: Increasingly, researchers attempt to assess quality of life, subjective states, and attitudes. This book provides detailed guidance on scale development, reliability, validity, bias, administration, ethics, and generalization theory. Prior editions of this book were published in 2003, 1995, and 1989.
Purpose: The purpose is to provide a resource to researchers in the health sciences (e.g., epidemiology, medicine, etc.) on the subject of measurement. The book succeeds (as did prior editions) in covering aspects of psychosocial measurement with relevant health-related examples.
Audience: Although the target audience is health researchers, the book is appropriate not just for researchers, but also for graduate students. The authors are well regarded and their book is a staple on the bookshelves of many researchers interested in measurement of subjective states, attitudes, etc.
Features: Starting with the importance of conducting a literature review and an overview of basic comments, including validity and measurement error, the book moves on to item development. It clearly describes how best to scale responses and when particular response approaches are most appropriate. The book delves into dealing with missing items, weighting items, standardization of scores, and methods of categorization and establishing cutpoints based on distribution of the data, judgment, and approaches to determining sensitivity and specificity. It has a new chapter on generalizability theory (G-theory) and a new and more straightforward approach to defining and assessing validity. It describes how to measure change in different types of studies, measures of association, and growth curves. The chapter on item response theory covers complex models, classical test theory, and differential item functioning. Another new chapter covers methods of administration, including computer-assisted administration. The book ends with chapters on ethics and reporting test results based on the Standards for Reporting Diagnostic Accuracy (STARD) initiative.
Assessment: The authors have added new material and expanded other material in important ways since the first edition. While all chapters are useful, the updated discussion of validity and the new section on G-theory will stand out as important references for readers. I have always kept a copy of the first edition of this book on my shelves. It is regularly loaned out (and never returned), so I have replaced copy after copy over the years. I look forward to replacing my old edition with this new, more fleshed out, more complete, and very up-to-date book. I will continue to use it in my classes.
From The Critics
Reviewer: James C. Torner, MS, PhD(University of Iowa College of Public Health)
Description: Increasingly, researchers attempt to assess quality of life, subjective states, and attitudes. This book provides detailed guidance on scale development, reliability, validity, bias, administration, ethics, and generalization theory. Prior editions of this book were published in 2003, 1995, and 1989.
Purpose: The purpose is to provide a resource to researchers in the health sciences (e.g., epidemiology, medicine, etc.) on the subject of measurement. The book succeeds (as did prior editions) in covering aspects of psychosocial measurement with relevant health-related examples.
Audience: Although the target audience is health researchers, the book is appropriate not just for researchers, but also for graduate students. The authors are well regarded and their book is a staple on the bookshelves of many researchers interested in measurement of subjective states, attitudes, etc.
Features: Starting with the importance of conducting a literature review and an overview of basic comments, including validity and measurement error, the book moves on to item development. It clearly describes how best to scale responses and when particular response approaches are most appropriate. The book delves into dealing with missing items, weighting items, standardization of scores, and methods of categorization and establishing cutpoints based on distribution of the data, judgment, and approaches to determining sensitivity and specificity. It has a new chapter on generalizability theory (G-theory) and a new and more straightforward approach to defining and assessing validity. It describes how to measure change in different types of studies, measures of association, and growth curves. The chapter on item response theory covers complex models, classical test theory, and differential item functioning. Another new chapter covers methods of administration, including computer-assisted administration. The book ends with chapters on ethics and reporting test results based on the Standards for Reporting Diagnostic Accuracy (STARD) initiative.
Assessment: The authors have added new material and expanded other material in important ways since the first edition. While all chapters are useful, the updated discussion of validity and the new section on G-theory will stand out as important references for readers. I have always kept a copy of the first edition of this book on my shelves. It is regularly loaned out (and never returned), so I have replaced copy after copy over the years. I look forward to replacing my old edition with this new, more fleshed out, more complete, and very up-to-date book. I will continue to use it in my classes.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780199231881
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
  • Publication date: 12/15/2008
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 4
  • Pages: 428
  • Sales rank: 698,989
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author

David Streiner attended the City College of New York, and then did his graduate work in clinical psychology at Syracuse University. In 1968, he joined the newly-formed Department of Psychiatry at McMaster University, and became the Chief Psychologist at the McMaster University Medical Centre. In 1980, he also became a member of the Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics at McMaster, and was the Deputy Chair of CE&B for two years. He was one of the founding editors of Evidence-based Mental Health, and is currently editor of the Statistical Developments and Applications section of the Journal of Personality Assessment, as well as being on the editorial board of numerous other journals.
Geoff Norman attended the University of Manitoba as an undergraduate, graduating with an honours degree in physics in 1965. He did graduate work in nuclear physics, obtaining a PhD in 1970. At that point he began a career in health sciences education, and subsequently obtained an M.A. in educational psychology from Michigan State University in 1977. He joined the faculty at McMaster in 1977, and has remained at McMaster for the next three decades. He has won numerous awards in medical education, including the Hubbard Award of the National Board of Medical Examiners (US), and lifetime achievement awards from the Medical Council of Canada and the American Educational Research Association, among others. In 2001, he was awarded a Canada Research Chair. In 2007, he was elected to the Royal Society of Canada. He has published over 200 papers in education, epidemiology, psychiatry and physics, as well as authoring and editing several books.

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