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Healthy Anger: How to Help Children and Teens Manage Their Anger
     

Healthy Anger: How to Help Children and Teens Manage Their Anger

by Bernard Golden
 

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How should we respond to a child's temper tantrum? To a teenager's sullen resentment? How can we help children and teens experience their anger without being overwhelmed by it? How can we deal with their anger before it leads to depression, isolation, or even violence?

In Healthy Anger, Bernard Golden draws upon more than twenty years of experience as

Overview


How should we respond to a child's temper tantrum? To a teenager's sullen resentment? How can we help children and teens experience their anger without being overwhelmed by it? How can we deal with their anger before it leads to depression, isolation, or even violence?

In Healthy Anger, Bernard Golden draws upon more than twenty years of experience as a psychologist and teacher to offer specific, practical strategies for helping children and teens manage their anger constructively. Golden has developed a set of skills that parents, teachers, and counselors can use to show children how to identify the causes of anger; how to respond to it in ways that lead to an internal sense of competence and self-control; how to use anger to understand their own emotional situation; and how to develop a greater capacity for empathy towards themselves and others. And he shows parents how to cope with outbursts--including clear, step-by-step instructions and problem-solving skills--how to derail escalating anger, reward good behaviors, and recognize when professional help is needed. For anyone who has ever helplessly confronted a child's rage or a teenager's defiant fury, Healthy Anger offers a wealth of wise insight, clear advice, and eminently practical strategies for turning anger into understanding.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Golden, a teacher at Chicago's Illinois School of Professional Psychology, assures parents it's okay if their kids get mad, agreeing with the common view that "anger is not a sign of emotional instability. It is a perfectly natural emotion." As any parent of a teed off toddler or antagonistic adolescent knows, if the tempest isn't to be tamed, it needs to be redirected. Parents will find advice on how to do just that, but they must be willing to slog through some lengthy and fairly scholarly passages on identifying the emotions associated with anger and recognizing the motivations behind it. Although the table on assessing the frequency of a child's anger expressions (which includes on its list neediness, vandalism, anxiety, scapegoating, lateness, substance abuse and sexual promiscuity) may be ill-suited for younger children, it should help parents of angry teens. For parents seeking a quick fix, Golden's geometric diagrams and guidelines based on psychological theory (e.g., "The notion of suppressed, repressed, or hidden emotions is especially important in regard to anger") might perplex. But those interested in learning about the deep reasons behind their children's anger should find enlightening data here. (Jan.) Copyright 2003 Cahners Business Information.
Library Journal
Golden (Illinois Sch. of Professional Psychology) believes that anger is a natural and healthy emotion that should be explored rather than repressed. Here, he presents a useful model to help parents manage their children's and teenagers' ire. Through its different components, the author explains how children and teens, by way of self-reflection and communication, can gain a better understanding of their needs, wants, expectations, and emotions. Exercises are offered to help one get in touch with emotions, to relax, and to listen to self-talk. Although Golden well explains the model and strategies, using a lot of clinical examples to lighten his tone, the amount of information may at times overwhelm readers. In addition, he strongly recommends that parents first practice the strategies on themselves before trying them with their kids. For those reasons, this book might put off some parents. However, those who tackle it will find inspiration. Recommended for academic and larger public libraries; those looking for a less rigorous approach should check out Tim Murphy's The Angry Child.-Maryse Breton, Davis Branch Lib., CA Copyright 2003 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780195304503
Publisher:
Oxford University Press, USA
Publication date:
02/23/2006
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
336
Sales rank:
666,688
Product dimensions:
7.90(w) x 5.30(h) x 0.80(d)

Meet the Author

Bernard Golden teaches in the Illinois School of Professional Psychology, Chicago, and is a therapist in private practice, offering workshops to teachers, mental health professionals, parents, and adolescents. He is a co-author of New Hope for People With Bipolar Disorder and lives in Chicago.

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