Hearing Birds Fly

Hearing Birds Fly

4.0 1
by Louisa Waugh
     
 

HEARING BIRDS FLY is Louisa Waugh's passionately written account of her time in a remote Mongolian village. Frustrated by the increasingly bland character of the capital city of Ulan Bator, she yearned for the real Mongolia and got the chance when she was summoned by the village head to go to Tsengel far away in the west, near the Kazakh border. Her story

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Overview

HEARING BIRDS FLY is Louisa Waugh's passionately written account of her time in a remote Mongolian village. Frustrated by the increasingly bland character of the capital city of Ulan Bator, she yearned for the real Mongolia and got the chance when she was summoned by the village head to go to Tsengel far away in the west, near the Kazakh border. Her story completely transports the reader to feel the glacial cold and to see the wonders of the Seven Kings as they steadily emerge from the horizon.

Through her we sense their trials as well as their joys, rivalries and even hostilities, many of which the author shared or knew about. Her time in the village was marked by coming to terms with the harshness of climate and also by how she faced up to new feelings towards the treatment of animals, death, solitude and real loneliness, and the constant struggle to censor her reactions as an outsider. Above all, Louisa Waugh involves us with the locals' lives in such a way that we come to know them and care for their fates.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
An elegy to a remarkable part of the world.—SUNDAY TIMES

With a skill and art quite extraordinary for a first book ... the reader is drawn into the world she describes through the warmth of her friendships and the sympathy and generosity with which she treats all aspects of her subject. I put the book down finally with a sense of absolute satisfaction, having spent the last few hours beneath the spell of a writer of real integrity and power—Chris Stewart

Waugh has captured the starkly beautiful landscapes in restrained descriptive passages, but the most fascinating aspect of her narrative is her portrayal of the villagers and the nomads she meets higher up the mountains... HEARING BIRDS FLY is an extraordi—OBSERVER

Her great strength is telling the villager s' stories, which she does with an engaging blend of charm, directness, humour and awe at the power of nature... It is a mark of Waugh's success that the romantic terra incognita she describes, helped by unsentime—TLS

Library Journal
Tsengel is a remote village in the far west of Mongolia, 1000 miles over poor roads from the capital city of Ulan Bator. British journalist Waugh decided to spend a year there teaching English while living in a ger (yurt), eating monotonous basic food, and enduring dust storms, bitter cold, filthy and unhealthy conditions, and loneliness. She befriended Mongols, Tuvans, and Kazakhs and writes sympathetically of their simple, seminomadic lives. A good study of life in contemporary rural Mongolia, the book is also an account of the author's determination to test herself in this most hostile environment. Unfortunately, the text bogs down in Waugh's own considerable but self-induced discomforts. Still, with growing political and tourist interest in this little understood but vast region of central Asia, this book has a niche. For larger public libraries. Harold M. Otness, formerly with Southern Oregon Univ. Lib., Ashland Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780349115801
Publisher:
Little, Brown Book Group
Publication date:
03/28/2004
Pages:
288
Sales rank:
761,186
Product dimensions:
5.00(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.75(d)

Meet the Author

Louise Waugh has written for the GUARDIAN on Ulan Bator, and a 10-part series on Mongolia for the BBC World Service.

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Hearing Birds Fly 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
SphinxFeathers More than 1 year ago
Looking for something her soul desired deeply, Waugh follows her dreams to Mongolia. She starts out in Ulanbaator, but that's not enough, so she journeys further. One can easily envision the hardships of the people and place oneself in her shoes. Inspiring and informative and well-worth the read.