Heart Divided [NOOK Book]

Overview

Is the Confederate battle flag a racist symbol—or a proud reminder of Southern heritage?

When Kate’s liberal-minded family moves from the suburbs of New York City to a small town near Nashville, Kate is convinced her life is over. Redford lives up to Kate’s low expectations. The Confederate battle flag waves proudly in the sky, the local diner serves grits and sweet tea, and country music rules the airwaves. Then she meets Jackson Redford ...
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Heart Divided

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Overview

Is the Confederate battle flag a racist symbol—or a proud reminder of Southern heritage?

When Kate’s liberal-minded family moves from the suburbs of New York City to a small town near Nashville, Kate is convinced her life is over. Redford lives up to Kate’s low expectations. The Confederate battle flag waves proudly in the sky, the local diner serves grits and sweet tea, and country music rules the airwaves. Then she meets Jackson Redford III, scion of the town and embodiment of everything Dixie. And dang if brilliant, gorgeous Jack doesn’t make Kate decide that maybe her new hometown isn’t so bad after all. But a petition to replace the school’s Confederate flag symbol is stirring up trouble. Kate dives right in, not afraid to attack what she sees as offensive. Getting involved means making enemies, though, and soon, Kate and Jack—and their families—find themselves pitted against each other in a bitter controversy: not just about the flag, but about what it means to be an American.


From the Hardcover edition.

When sixteen-year-old Kate, an aspiring playright, moves from New Jersey to attend high school in the South, she becomes embroiled in a controversy to remove the school's Confederate flag symbol.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Shortly after Bennett and Gottesfeld's (the Trash series) strained novel opens, a family move wrenches 16-year-old narrator Kate from her suburban friends and beloved playwriting workshops in New York City, and immerses her in Redford, a small Tennessee town. Disgusted when she learns that the Confederate flag is the emblem of the high school football team, called the Rebels, Kate joins a campaign to change the team's insignia and name, a crusade spearheaded by a black girl. Meanwhile, Kate loses her heart to Jack Redford, a handsome, popular, too-good-to-be-true senior whose family has given the town its name and a long line of military heroes. While his mother assumes Jack will follow his ancestors and enroll at the Citadel, Jack longs to be an actor and Kate, of course, encourages him to follow his dream. The simmering racial tensions reach a crescendo when the burning of a Confederate flag before a big football game triggers a m l e during which a gun goes off and-in a stretch of credibility-Kate's younger sister is the only person wounded. The tale comes to a melodramatic close with a play written by the heroine, who throughout has been trying to find an authentic voice. The issues here offer much to ponder, but the presentation, like the relationship between Kate and Jack, often seems close to soap opera. Ages 12-up. (Mar.) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
Kate Pride is a savvy, sixteen-year-old New Yorker interested in boys, cool clothes and writing plays. Playwriting is Kate's thing, and she has just been selected to participate in the Public Theater's prestigious Young Playwrights Showcase when her father's new job necessitates a move to the small town of Redford, Tennessee, where the Confederate flag still flies in the main square, everybody knows everybody, and the high school football team is named The Rebels. Kate's junior year at Redford High is personally, politically and creatively transformative and makes for a great read. With Jack Redford, namesake of the town's founding fathers, she finds true love but also the legacy of his family's expectations for him. She helps her friend Nikki launch a petition drive to change the football team's name to something less offensive to the school's African American students. She interviews racists and civil rights advocates about the town's history in an unsuccessful attempt to turn her impressions of racial tension at the high school into a brilliant play. At the season's most important football game, when violence erupts over the petition drive, Kate and her family suffer tragically and she learns that, yes, she does know enough, after all, to write well and true about the complexities of race in America. A wise, wonderful teen book, with an enjoyable romance, well-drawn family relationships, vivid portraits of a high school social scene, and a substantive theme that comes across with more heart than political correctness. 2004, Delacorte Press/Random House, Ages 13 up.
—J. H. Diehl
KLIATT
Bennett and Gottesfeld have collaborated on fiction, plays, and other writing projects. Bennett is the author of the ALA Best Book for YAs, Life in the Fat Lane, and together they wrote the play and novel Anne Frank and Me. They have lived in the NY city area and also in Nashville, so they have solid knowledge about the setting of this novel. Kate is the narrator. She is a smart, creative 16-year-old who has been active in the theater and yearns to be a playwright. She and her family (liberal mother and father, younger sister Portia) move from New Jersey to a town named Redford, close to Nashville, Tennessee. It seems like a completely different country, and Kate feels like a foreigner. Soon, however, Kate meets Jack Redford, the son of the first family of the city, and the two of them fall in love, sharing a serious interest in the theatre—Jack wants to be an actor. She also meets Nikki, the daughter of one of the black ministers in town and a civil rights activist, and becomes a volunteer in the quest to demand a vote in the high school to change the school team name from The Rebels and to remove the Confederate flag as their emblem. This is where the heart divided comes in: and it is really Jack who is most divided. His ancestors were Civil War heroes who were also slave owners—this is his heritage. He isn't proud of it, but it is his history. Many characters are introduced as Kate attempts to write a play about the divisions in the town—African Americans and white people from several generations with varying political viewpoints. While the racial/cultural divide is always in the background, the action of the novel encompasses familiar and popular YAthemes: new girl in school; romantic love; undue interference of a parent in a teen's life (Jeff's mother forces him to transfer to a military academy to keep him away from Kate and her liberal, Northern influences); jealousy of Jeff's former girlfriend; young Portia's awkward adjustments to middle school and first boyfriends. The tensions in the town caused by the Confederate flag/rebel controversy get worse and worse, until tragedy results. The final 80 pages of the novel is a section called "A Heart Divided; A Performance Piece," written by Kate and performed by Jeff and Nikki. (This is inspired by the work of Anna Deveare Smith, especially her performance piece, Fires in the Mirror.) Voices from the body of the novel appear in this play and we can see how Kate has mentally and emotionally processed her experience of this Southern town and its people. The performance piece is an amazingly creative work, and so is the novel as a whole. YAs from all regions of the US will understand the struggles of Kate and Jack. And all who are interested in the theater and in creative writing will especially enjoy this intelligent contribution to YA literature. KLIATT Codes: JS*—Exceptional book, recommended for junior and senior high school students. 2004, Random House, Delacorte, 309p., Ages 12 to 18.
—Claire Rosser
From The Critics
Kate Pride, at age ten, decides with passion her purpose in life, when her parents take her to see her first Broadway play in New York City. She wants to be a writer! Five years later, her parents enroll her in the appropriate classes for such a career, and Kate is chosen for an elite playwright club. So, when her father tells the family they are moving to Tennessee because of a job transfer, Kate feels her life is over. Although she finds their new home charming, and the townspeople extraordinarily friendly, the high school is a different story. She finds it filled with young adults of traditional views, a school divided between some white people who still want to raise the Confederate flag and some black people who view the flag as racism. Kate meets a boy named Jackson Redford. He and Kate fall in love and realize their hearts are not divided. When a family member is caught in the crossfire of a riot at a football game, Kate is able to write the play reminding the students of what they were fighting for. 2004, Delacorte Press, 306 pp., Ages young adult.
—Vicki Boartfield
VOYA
Sixteen-year-old Kate Pride and her family move from New Jersey to Redford, Tennessee, where Kate falls in love with the town royal, Jack Redford, and joins a movement against the schools' symbols: the Confederate Flag and Rebels. Kate attempts to write a play about the controversy. Jack's ex-girlfriend feigns friendship with Kate, makes sure that her classmates know Kate's subject, and then puts Kate's name on a play that mocks Redford's attitudes and heritage. Reacting to pressure from his mother and friends to dump Kate, Jack decides to run away to New York with her and study acting, his dream. They attend one last Redford football game where the emblem controversy escalates to a brawl. When a bullet hits Kate's little sister, injuring her spine, the incident unites the town. In the style of Anna Deveare Smith's Fires in the Mirror (Anchor Books, 1994), Kate writes "a performance piece," the second part of the book and also titled A Heart Divided, which illustrates the complicated and volatile relationship between symbols and feelings. As in Anne Frank and Me (G. P. Putnam's Sons, 2001/VOYA April 2001), the authors challenge readers to learn about and take responsibility for history's injustices. Kate's overdramatic narrative voice in the novel, however, often makes her unappealing and unbelievable. She and the rest of the characters are somewhat flat. Sophisticated older teens might not have the patience to wait for her play. VOYA Codes: 3Q 3P J S (Readable without serious defects; Will appeal with pushing; Junior High, defined as grades 7 to 9; Senior High, defined as grades 10 to 12). 2004, Delacorte, 320p., Ages 12 to 18.
—Lucy Schall
School Library Journal
Gr 8 Up-When her parents decide to move from New Jersey to Tennessee, 16-year-old Kate is bitterly unhappy about giving up her friends and her spot in a prestigious playwriting workshop. Racial tensions abound in Redford and Kate learns quickly that she is a very northern girl in the middle of a very southern town. She decides to write a play about the town's act of flying the Confederate flag and the opposition that it causes. When she meets Jack Redford, a Romeo-and-Juliet-type romance begins. Kate joins the students trying to get their school's team name changed from the Rebels and the Confederate flag taken down, and Jack struggles to explain to his mother that he does not want to attend the Citadel, even though it is a family tradition. His mother also decides that Kate is not the girl for him. Readers can sense disaster on the horizon, but when it strikes Kate's innocent sister, only then does the protagonist truly understand the importance of experiencing life before writing about it. While Redford does not exist, it is based on real locations, making the setting believable. The authors have created passionate characters, an emotional climax, and an ending that suits the story, successfully weaving these elements into the voice of Kate Pride, an endearing teen who often lacks humility but believes in herself and her ideas.-Delia Fritz, Mercersburg Academy, PA Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Kate Pride's liberal-minded mother wants her to be a Woman of Purpose, and Kate longs to be like the cool, pierced girls in the magazines who "looked as if they did drugs and had sex even if they didn't." But she has an epiphany at a performance of The Crucible, falls in love with playwriting, and moves to Tennessee, where the lessons learned from The Crucible inform her way of surviving a new high school. The authors get the details of small-town Tennessee life right-meat-and-three restaurants, waitresses who call you "honey," fruit tea, heat and humidity, and statues of Confederate soldiers. It's the Confederate flag-the "racist flag," as Kate calls it-that becomes the contentious issue at her new high school, and Kate is the Yankee outsider in the midst of controversy. The novel, which includes a script of the play Kate writes about the flag issue, would make a fine one-two punch with Arthur Miller's play in a high-school classroom. (afterword) (Fiction. 12+)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780307556653
  • Publisher: Random House Children's Books
  • Publication date: 5/6/2009
  • Sold by: Random House
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 320
  • Age range: 12 years
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

Cherie Bennett and Jeff Gottesfeld have collaborated on fiction, stage, and other writing projects. For more information, visit them on the Web at www.cheriebennett.com.


From the Hardcover edition.
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Read an Excerpt

1


My knees were scrunched to my chest, palms sweaty, stomach churning, heart pounding. Panic attack. It happened every time something I wrote was about to be performed. It was happening now.

It had been five years since my epiphany during The Crucible. That night, I'd fallen in love with plays the way some girls fall in love with horses or dolphins. If I could have moved a cot into the back of a theater and lived there, I would have been perfectly happy.

After I declared my goal in life, my mother immediately enrolled me in a junior writing workshop at the Public Theater. Then, to nurture my nascent muse, my parents took me to a play almost every single weekend. Since they believed that anything shocking I might see onstage could act as a catalyst for discussion about societal values in general, and our family's values in particular, we went to everything. The first time I actually saw a completely naked man was in a drama about gay lovers, at an off-off-Broadway loft theater in TriBeCa.

I also read every play I could get my hands on--Shakespeare, Chekhov, Lillian Hellman, August Wilson, and so many more. I'd lie in bed at night, trying to peel back layers of meaning, only to find new layers. I'd wonder if I'd ever be able to write like they did, with lives fully explored in the world of the play itself.

Now, in the Public Theater's high school playwrights' lab, I sat in the back row of the same space where I'd seen The Crucible and tried not to hyperventilate. My friend BB slid into the seat next to me. BB--short for Byron Bruin--lived in Harlem and went to Bronx Science. His mom was a jazz composer born in Suriname, and his father was a Swedish diplomat. In the looks department, BB got the best of both worlds.

"Deep breaths," BB instructed, taking in the sweat on my forehead. He'd seen me in this state too many times.

"I'd settle for breathing at all," I managed.

He reached into his backpack. "I know just what you need."

"I don't do drugs."

"Ow!" A sharp pain throbbed in my upper arm. "What the--"

BB held up the metal ruler he'd just thwacked against my bicep.

"Jerk!" I smacked his arm. "That hurt."

He smiled smugly. "But notice you're breathing almost normally. The actual pain-transmission neurons in your arm override the psychosomatic symptoms of panic," he explained. "I'm running trials for a p-chem lab."

That was just so Bronx Science.

Finally, the actors took their places; the house lights dimmed and the audience hushed. As BB gave my hand an encouraging squeeze, the stage manager read the title of my piece.


PLAYED

- a short play by Kate Pride -

At rise: The ladies' room at a hipper-than-thou club. KIM and DAWN, both sixteen, run in, breathless. They're clad in the latest everything, all the trappings of beauty without achieving it.

KIM

Oh my G--

DAWN

I saw him and I'm like, whoa--

KIM

He never brought me here. He said the cover was too high. And he brings her. Was I okay?

DAWN

Totally. You were all like, (blase) Oh, hi, Kevin.

KIM

Like, (equally blase) Oh, I see you're with your new girlfriend, Mia.

DAWN

Right, you're all like, Kevin who?

They crack up and fist-bump each other, then check themselves out in the mirror and methodically pull out an arsenal of beauty products. They primp throughout the scene, often speaking to each other's reflections. Kim checks out her rear view.

KIM

Okay, I am a total cow. You could snort lines off my ass.

DAWN

Shut up! You are so hot.

KIM

Hotter than--?

DAWN

Totally! Did you check out those thighs? Every time she takes a step, they like, suffocate each other.

KIM

And what is up with that do?

DAWN

Hello, Chia Pet?

KIM

And that uni!

DAWN

I should have been all like, Oh, cute outfit. My mother has it.

They crack up and trade another fist bump.

DAWN

I know people at her old school. The girl is played.

KIM

Really?

DAWN

Seriously mattress tested.

KIM

Well, Kevin and I never--you know--so if that's what he wants, then whatever. Because I am totally over--

They're interrupted when the girl they're dissing enters. MIA, also sixteen, is effortlessly beautiful and knows it. She joins them at the mirror, fixing her makeup.

MIA

(too cool)

Oh. Hi. Having fun?

KIM

Not really. This club is so played. There are like, twelve-year-olds here with fake ID.

MIA

Kevin and I are so into each other, we didn't notice. So, we should hang sometime. I'll call you.

KIM

I'll hold my breath.

Mia scrutinizes Kim.

MIA

(snarky) Cute outfit. My mother has it.

Triumphant, she exits. Kim is humiliated. A long, awkward beat as she tries to deal.

DAWN

Okay, she totally rides a broom.

KIM

At least her ass fits on one.

DAWN

Kimmy. The boy was never in your league.

KIM

Really?

DAWN

Really.

They methodically throw all their cosmetics back into their purses, cross to the door, and stop.

KIM

Dawnie. Thanks.

DAWN

For what?

KIM

The courtesy clueless. It's like she's so . . . and I'm so--

DAWN

Not. She's not.

KIM

Hot, you mean.

DAWN

She's not.

KIM

Really?

DAWN

Really.

Really, they both know this is a lie. And they both know they know. They share a final best-friend fist bump, take a deep breath, and laugh ostentatiously to ensure that anyone who sees them will think they're having a fabulous time. As they exit into the club, the lights fade.

From the Hardcover edition.

Read More Show Less

First Chapter

1



My knees were scrunched to my chest, palms sweaty, stomach churning, heart pounding. Panic attack. It happened every time something I wrote was about to be performed. It was happening now.

It had been five years since my epiphany during The Crucible. That night, I'd fallen in love with plays the way some girls fall in love with horses or dolphins. If I could have moved a cot into the back of a theater and lived there, I would have been perfectly happy.

After I declared my goal in life, my mother immediately enrolled me in a junior writing workshop at the Public Theater. Then, to nurture my nascent muse, my parents took me to a play almost every single weekend. Since they believed that anything shocking I might see onstage could act as a catalyst for discussion about societal values in general, and our family's values in particular, we went to everything. The first time I actually saw a completely naked man was in a drama about gay lovers, at an off-off-Broadway loft theater in TriBeCa.

I also read every play I could get my hands on--Shakespeare, Chekhov, Lillian Hellman, August Wilson, and so many more. I'd lie in bed at night, trying to peel back layers of meaning, only to find new layers. I'd wonder if I'd ever be able to write like they did, with lives fully explored in the world of the play itself.

Now, in the Public Theater's high school playwrights' lab, I sat in the back row of the same space where I'd seen The Crucible and tried not to hyperventilate. My friend BB slid into the seat next to me. BB--short for Byron Bruin--lived in Harlem and went to Bronx Science. His mom was a jazz composer born in Suriname, and his father was aSwedish diplomat. In the looks department, BB got the best of both worlds.

"Deep breaths," BB instructed, taking in the sweat on my forehead. He'd seen me in this state too many times.

"I'd settle for breathing at all," I managed.

He reached into his backpack. "I know just what you need."

"I don't do drugs."

"Ow!" A sharp pain throbbed in my upper arm. "What the--"

BB held up the metal ruler he'd just thwacked against my bicep.

"Jerk!" I smacked his arm. "That hurt."

He smiled smugly. "But notice you're breathing almost normally. The actual pain-transmission neurons in your arm override the psychosomatic symptoms of panic," he explained. "I'm running trials for a p-chem lab."

That was just so Bronx Science.

Finally, the actors took their places; the house lights dimmed and the audience hushed. As BB gave my hand an encouraging squeeze, the stage manager read the title of my piece.



PLAYED

- a short play by Kate Pride -

At rise: The ladies' room at a hipper-than-thou club. KIM and DAWN, both sixteen, run in, breathless. They're clad in the latest everything, all the trappings of beauty without achieving it.

KIM

Oh my G--

DAWN

I saw him and I'm like, whoa--

KIM

He never brought me here. He said the cover was too high. And he brings her. Was I okay?

DAWN

Totally. You were all like, (blase) Oh, hi, Kevin.

KIM

Like, (equally blase) Oh, I see you're with your new girlfriend, Mia.

DAWN

Right, you're all like, Kevin who?

They crack up and fist-bump each other, then check themselves out in the mirror and methodically pull out an arsenal of beauty products. They primp throughout the scene, often speaking to each other's reflections. Kim checks out her rear view.

KIM

Okay, I am a total cow. You could snort lines off my ass.

DAWN

Shut up! You are so hot.

KIM

Hotter than--?

DAWN

Totally! Did you check out those thighs? Every time she takes a step, they like, suffocate each other.

KIM

And what is up with that do?

DAWN

Hello, Chia Pet?

KIM

And that uni!

DAWN

I should have been all like, Oh, cute outfit. My mother has it.

They crack up and trade another fist bump.

DAWN

I know people at her old school. The girl is played.

KIM

Really?

DAWN

Seriously mattress tested.

KIM

Well, Kevin and I never--you know--so if that's what he wants, then whatever. Because I am totally over--

They're interrupted when the girl they're dissing enters. MIA, also sixteen, is effortlessly beautiful and knows it. She joins them at the mirror, fixing her makeup.

MIA

(too cool)

Oh. Hi. Having fun?

KIM

Not really. This club is so played. There are like, twelve-year-olds here with fake ID.

MIA

Kevin and I are so into each other, we didn't notice. So, we should hang sometime. I'll call you.

KIM

I'll hold my breath.

Mia scrutinizes Kim.

MIA

(snarky) Cute outfit. My mother has it.

Triumphant, she exits. Kim is humiliated. A long, awkward beat as she tries to deal.

DAWN

Okay, she totally rides a broom.

KIM

At least her ass fits on one.

DAWN

Kimmy. The boy was never in your league.

KIM

Really?

DAWN

Really.

They methodically throw all their cosmetics back into their purses, cross to the door, and stop.

KIM

Dawnie. Thanks.

DAWN

For what?

KIM

The courtesy clueless. It's like she's so . . . and I'm so--

DAWN

Not. She's not.

KIM

Hot, you mean.

DAWN

She's not.

KIM

Really?

DAWN

Really.

Really, they both know this is a lie. And they both know they know. They share a final best-friend fist bump, take a deep breath, and laugh ostentatiously to ensure that anyone who sees them will think they're having a fabulous time. As they exit into the club, the lights fade.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 8 )
Rating Distribution

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Sort by: Showing all of 9 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 23, 2008

    If one side is right, does that make the other side wrong?

    In the past, Kate has been introduced to piano lessons, Russian lessons, photography, ballet, politics, space camp, computer camp, and world peace camp all via her mom¿s quest to find Kate¿s purpose in life. Kate has a theory that she really has no purpose, and her mother needs to accept that. Although her theory is proven wrong once she is introduced to playwriting. She falls in love with it. She¿s at the top of her well renowned playwright class and about to start her junior year in high school when her dad has been given a job offer in Tennessee. It shatters her life. Kate and her family move from New York City to Redford, Tennessee, home of the Rebels. Kate tries to get this Southern proud community to stop waving the Confederate flag as if they don¿t realize the war is over and the Union won. Can Kate succeed or will she let her attraction to the descendent of Redford¿s founding father distract her from her cause? Jackson Redford III has to choose between his family¿s Southern roots and what is right when he becomes intertwined with Kate and her Yankee ideas. Surprisingly, Jackson Redford has some secrets of his own. A Heart Divided has the perfect combination of romance, patriotism, and heartache. I love the bittersweet ending that leaves readers crying on the inside. While reading this fast paced novel, I got a taste of what it would be like to live in a rebel community. The descriptions of the angst between the whites and blacks living in Redford were perfectly realistic. I liked how even though Kate Pride, the main character, was passionate about playwriting, something I have never even thought about doing, I could still relate to her life. I have never read a book like A Heart Divided, but I¿ve read some that are slightly similar. Jodi Picoult books would fit into this category. In Keeping Faith, one of the main characters starts to fall in love with a reporter who is out to publicize her daughter as a crazy basically, the main character falls for the enemy. That is very much like Kate and Jackson¿s situation. Jackson¿s name and family history represents everything that is Confederate, and he is not sure that he wants that. Kate is not sure if she wants Jackson. The question is whether or not they will accept what they are given or tear away from the norm and live life their own way.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 8, 2005

    Beautifully written

    When I finished this book I was completely speechless. The ending play is beyond words. Kate inspires us all that its okay to want something even if it seems impossible. I thought the way Kate handled her man, the racist, and better yet her life in the most professional and deserving way I wish my life was like hers.If you want a book with a powerful message this is without a doubt a book that is great to turn to and read.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 2, 2004

    'Ouch!' This noise came from under the table, I pushed away from the table and jumped just as a guy crawled out and stood up.

    Has this ever happened to you, and freaked you out? Well, Kate sure was freaked. Kate Pride,the main character in A HEART DIVIDED writen by Cherie Bennett and Jeff Gottesfeld,had just meet Jack Redford...the 3rd. Kate didn't know thet Jack was a very important person, even the high school was named after him! On the first day of school at Redford High, Kate had just met her new best friend, Nikki Roberts. When Nikki decided to change the Redford Flag, trouble stirred up in the school. But, that is just the beginning. I really liked this book because it has an awesome story to tell. The story of a girl that is going through a lot of changes in her life (a lot like me). It tells of how she deals with all of the changes. What I also liked about this book is the author's way of writing. They had a lot of detail and it was very descriptive, and easy to understand. If I were to rate this book from 1 to 10 I whould give it a nine. Megan Montalbano 6th grade

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 3, 2004

    A Comedy/Romance/Drama Story

    I stayed up all night finishing this book! I think that this definitely shows both sides to the story, and this changes my viewpoint on Southern culture. I also realize how racism is still a big problem in our country. I think the romance between Kate and Jack was really sweet and honest, and you can tell nothing was fake about it. I can relate to Kate's indecision about whether moving back to New Jersey or staying in Redford, since I had moved recently from a small town and loved my life there, but when I moved to a bigger town I found the love of my life, so that was a similarity with us. I would recommend this to anyone as long as they had the will to read.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 19, 2004

    a heart divided

    this book is a very good for teens that have a problem moving to a new place. Kate was living in new jersey and her family moved to tennessee and she had a hard time getting ajusted to the town. a guy named Jack helped her settle in. jack and kate got to know eachother very well and became boyfriend and girlfriend. kate moved into a big house and loved it. kate and her church wanted to change the symble and logo to something other than the confederate flag. the school didn't like it to much so they fought back by puting a dead bird on her chair and a note that said they wanted her dead. kate went through a tough time but she made it through alrite. her and jack had planed their life together but of course they had some problems to work out like getting jack's mom to like kate. kate had got ajusted to the town and loved it. well kate and jack went to different shcools, (collages) and kate liked in new york and loved it. well i hope that the teens that read it this read the book. because you bring your own emotions into the book. it is a very good book and i would recamond it to all teens and preteens. it was writen by two very goo writers. well i hope you read thr book. ALWAYS BARBRA POOL

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 22, 2004

    303 of the BEST pages ever written!

    Just finished reading 'A Heart Divided.' 303 of the BEST pages ever written! Very moving and powerful story, and if you can show me anyone who can read this book without shedding a tear and getting a lump in their throat, I can show you a liar. The author truthfully and fairly represents both sides of the controversy. After my contact with this story, I find that I have developed a new respect for the Confederate battle flag. A new classic. Everyone should own a copy of this book!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 5, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 31, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 22, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

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