Heart of Darkness and Other Stories

Heart of Darkness and Other Stories

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by Joseph Conrad
     
 

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Heart of Darkness is a short and vividly brutal account of colonial enterprise that has as much in common with the jaded Evelyn Waugh of Black Mischief as it does with any of Conrad's direct contemporaries in the late nineteenth century. It is accompanied in this volume by the tales with which it has been published since 1902, the autobiographical short story

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Overview

Heart of Darkness is a short and vividly brutal account of colonial enterprise that has as much in common with the jaded Evelyn Waugh of Black Mischief as it does with any of Conrad's direct contemporaries in the late nineteenth century. It is accompanied in this volume by the tales with which it has been published since 1902, the autobiographical short story "Youth," and the less personal but more substantial tale of an old man's fall from fortune, "The End of the Tether." Though these stories differ considerably in style and content from his later novels, much of his reputation rests upon the words contained in this volume.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781904919865
Publisher:
CRW Publishing Ltd
Publication date:
09/01/2011
Edition description:
New
Pages:
376
Sales rank:
1,024,153
Product dimensions:
3.60(w) x 6.00(h) x 0.90(d)

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Joyce Carol Oates
One of the great, if troubling, visionary works of Western civilization.

Meet the Author

Joseph Conrad was born to Polish parents in 1857. Conrad was orphaned by the age of eleven and was subsequently taught by his uncle, a great influence and mentor. Leaving for Marseilles in 1874, Conrad began his training as a seaman. Conrad joined the British merchant navy and became a British subject in 1886. After his first novel, Almayer's Folly was published in 1895 he left the sea behind and settled down to a life of writing. Troubled financially for many years, he faced uncomplimentary critics and an indifferent public. He finally became a popular success with Chance (1913). By the end of his life on August 3, 1924, his status as one of the great writers of his time was assured.

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
December 3, 1857
Date of Death:
August 3, 1924
Place of Birth:
Berdiczew, Podolia, Russia
Place of Death:
Bishopsbourne, Kent, England
Education:
Tutored in Switzerland. Self-taught in classical literature. Attended maritime school in Marseilles, France

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Heart of Darkness and Other Stories 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book cannot be recommended highly enough.  But it is not light reading for small minds.  It is a landmark of literary fiction.  In a quasi-literate age such as ours, immersed in TV, cinema, and mass-market formula novels that require little if any thought, literary fiction in general goes unappreciated, because it is all about ideas rather than murders, mayhem, and explosions.  In short, this book is too good to engage the average modern reader.  It is for the intelligent and imaginative few who care about what it means to be human. “Heart of Darkness” is a masterpiece of literary fiction.  It is one of the great works of English literature, one that has influenced hundreds of major writers, as evidenced by those who contributed to the Introduction of this book.  It has also inspired several film interpretations, none of which succeeded in capturing the spirit and intellectual rigor of the original.  Film, as a medium, is suited to action and emotion, not thought.  It is in itself a unique experience.  “Heart of Darkness” is a short novel, easily read in one sitting; but it is not easily understood without re-reading, because it does not tell the reader what to think.  Instead, it requires an intellectual collaboration.  The reader must think about the ideas and moral choices Conrad presents and must think about them with precision.  It requires intellectual effort, which only superior readers are equipped to give.  Moreover, the book represents Conrad’s writing style at it best, and he is generally acknowledged to be one of the great English prose stylists.  Young writers should study it as an exemplar of extraordinarily clean craftsmanship.  There have been very few prose writers in English technically equal to Conrad. Finally, the novel is a requisite part of the education of an educated man or woman.  Those who have read and understood this book constitute a class apart.  Unfortunately, since Conrad’s time, the number of literate, educated people has declined precipitously.  But if you are one of the remaining few, the hardbound version of this book should be on your shelf and should be re-read often.