Heart of Darkness and The Secret Sharer (Centennial Edition)

Heart of Darkness and The Secret Sharer (Centennial Edition)

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by Joseph Conrad
     
 

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Two of Conrad’s BEST-KNOWN works—in a single volume

In this pair of literary voyages into the inner self, Joseph Conrad has written two of the most chilling, disturbing, and noteworthy pieces of fiction of the twentieth century.

Overview

Two of Conrad’s BEST-KNOWN works—in a single volume

In this pair of literary voyages into the inner self, Joseph Conrad has written two of the most chilling, disturbing, and noteworthy pieces of fiction of the twentieth century.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780451531032
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
08/05/2008
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
192
Sales rank:
241,530
Product dimensions:
4.20(w) x 6.70(h) x 0.60(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

What People are saying about this

Joyce Carol Oates
One of the great, if troubling, visionary works of Western civilization.

Meet the Author

A native of Poland, Joseph Conrad (1857-1924) spent his youth at sea, and although relatively ignorant of the English language until the age of twenty, he ultimately became one of the greatest English novelists and stylists. At the age of thirty-two, he decided to try his hand at writing, left the sea, married, and became the father of two sons. Although his work won the admiration of critics, sales were small, and debts and poor health plagued Conrad for many years, until the success of Chance (1913) gave him financial security. Among his best-known works are Lord Jim (1900), Heart of Darkness (1902), The Secret Sharer (1907), Under Western Eyes (1911), and Victory (1915). 
 
Joyce Carol Oates is the author of numerous novels, as well as collections of stories, poetry, and plays. The Roger S. Berlind Distinguished Professor in the Humanities at Princeton University, she is the recipient of numerous literary awards, including the National Book Award, the PEN/Bernard F. Malamud Award for the short story and the Prix Femina.
 
Vince Passaro is the author of Violence, Nudity, Adult Content: A Novel, as well as criticism, essays, and short fiction that have appeared in many national magazines, including Harper's Magazine, Esquire, GQ, Elle, O The Oprah Magazine, The New York Times Sunday Magazine, Story, Open City, Salon.com and others. Both his fiction and essays have been widely anthologized, and he has taught literature and creative writing at New York University and Columbia University.

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
December 3, 1857
Date of Death:
August 3, 1924
Place of Birth:
Berdiczew, Podolia, Russia
Place of Death:
Bishopsbourne, Kent, England
Education:
Tutored in Switzerland. Self-taught in classical literature. Attended maritime school in Marseilles, France

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Heart of Darkness and the Secret Sharer 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 22 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Slowly cools down
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Guest More than 1 year ago
In ¿The Secret Sharer¿, the main conflict is between a captain on a ship and an identical double of his. The captain while on night watch found this ¿secret sharer¿ of the captain¿s life. The captain finds this man swimming in the nude, lets him on board, puts a robe over him and hides the man in his closet. The captain risks his position as captain, his life and the lives of his men and ship. There are a couple of positives in this book. ¿¿the sea lightning played about his limbs at every stir, and he appeared in it ghastly, silvery, fishlike¿¿ (23), this is one stupendous example of Conrad¿s use of diction to illustrate the scene. Conrad utilizes another outstandingly excellent use of diction by explaining suspense the reader and captain feels. The captain questions the steward where he hung the captain¿s coat and the steward responds by saying, ¿In the bathroom, sir¿¿ (50), which is the exact location the secret sharer was. Which, because no one sees the secret sharer, leads to the idea that the captain is possibly insane. However, there are a couple of negatives one would consider about this book. The over use of, ¿¿the secret sharer of my life¿¿ (37), becomes quite agitating. Another negative is, what happens to the captain and his secret sharer?
Guest More than 1 year ago
One of the best books I've ever read...Especially for a classic...It used great language and vocabulary to capture the mind...And it greatly goes into depth of the evil in our souls...That dude below that said something about it being one of the worst books, definitely doesn't know what they are talking about...They must not be that literate and didn't understand the vocabulary...but...like I said...This is a great book for all you book lovers out there...
Guest More than 1 year ago
I urge anyone who reads this book to read Chinua Achebe's response, it is extremely eye opening to many. This is undoubtedly one of the great stories of all time, but the strength of Conrad's writing often causes the reader to accept the inherent racism in the novel.
Guest More than 1 year ago
When I picked up this book I knew I was in for quite a challenge. I am a sophmore in high school, and this book is recommended for advanced seniors. I read it and at first I had a feeling of slight uncertainty, but the adventure sucked me into it. As I read this I discovered that Joseph Conrad was bitter about Imperial rule in Africa. The bitterness shows in Conrad through Marlow's character. There was a very special pull I felt through Kurtz' character. That was darkness the theme of the novel which I felt Conrad excecuted beautifully. This will continue be a timeless classic through out English liturature.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Conrad's intense look at the nature of evil in all of us is spellbinding. This classic derserves six stars!
Guest More than 1 year ago
The dark places of a human soul is the region that Joseph Conrad so brilliantly explored. In the depths of the congo jungle it is man's capacity for good and evil.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The Heart of Darkness, every publisher's dream. All I can say is that it preserves itself because nothing changes. Conrad, quite the philanthropic artist.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Josef Konrad's 'Heart of Darkness' is truly one of the most inspired pieces of literature ever. A vast majority of the story is portrayed in dialogue, but it just goes to show that some of the most haunting and beautiful images are the things people say which then form in your mind. The beginning of the novel is a bit hard to grasp. But, after a dozen pages, you'll be hooked. Konrad learned his English from Shakespeare. I think he did a fine thing with that knowledge.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I was forced to read this book as a 10th grader and I am glad because. The depth of the psyches of the characters convinced me that anyone can be corrupt. These works, strangely enough, also sparked an interest in politics that I know have. These works also convinced me that I was capable of anything, and I can really identify with the captain in 'The Secret Sharer' and Marlow in 'Heart of Darkness'.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I was having hard time to read this book because English is my second language and the Author used many difficult words. However, the author himself spoke English as his second languages which encourages me to read through this book. I really enjoyed this book. The story is very deep and unique. I also enjoyed the prequal of the heart of darkness,'youth'.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Heart of Darkness was a truly excellent and profound read. Conrad accurately depicts the human condition, especially that which accompanies discovering oneself and discovering mankind. The narrator, Conrad's endearing Marlow, travels of the river, deep into the 'heart of darkness,' to find Kurtz, a man who has allowed the savage within himself to be expressed. Marlow soon learns that this capacity for evil lies within himself and within all men. To put it in Conrad's terms, 'The mind of man is capable of anything, because everything is in it--all the past as well as all the future.' We as people are able to act with goodness as well as evil; it is up to the individual to decide which is expressed.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This was by far the worst book I have ever read. It deserves to be burnt and never found again!