Heart of Darkness (Ad Classic Library Edition)

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Overview

When Charles Marlow accepts the captaincy of a steamship in the Congo, he witnesses the brutality with which the colonialists treat the African people. Setting off with a crew of cannibals, Marlow is tasked with transporting ivory downriver and rescuing a renowned ivory trader. On his journey Marlow encounters the darkness of the Congo wilderness, the darkness of the Europeans' cruel treatment of the natives, and the darkness within every human being for committing heinous acts ...
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Heart of Darkness

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Overview

When Charles Marlow accepts the captaincy of a steamship in the Congo, he witnesses the brutality with which the colonialists treat the African people. Setting off with a crew of cannibals, Marlow is tasked with transporting ivory downriver and rescuing a renowned ivory trader. On his journey Marlow encounters the darkness of the Congo wilderness, the darkness of the Europeans' cruel treatment of the natives, and the darkness within every human being for committing heinous acts of evil.

The Heart of Darkness was based on Joseph Conrad's experiences as a steamship captain in the Congo. Conrad interwove his observations of the darkness in mankind, man's potential for duplicity, and the struggle between good and evil in everyones soul. Widely regarded as a significant work of British literature, it was adapted by Orson Welles for the Mercury Theatre, and used as the basis for Francis Ford Coppola's Apocalypse Now.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781926606866
  • Publisher: Engage Books
  • Publication date: 12/1/2012
  • Pages: 108
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.38 (d)

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 402 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(244)

4 Star

(66)

3 Star

(41)

2 Star

(26)

1 Star

(25)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 403 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 8, 2011

    YOU MUST READ! But only with help...

    The Book Heart of Darkness was a very well thought out story. I would not have understood any of the book without someone to guide me through, but when someone guided me then it made sense to me. I would not recommend this book to anyone in high school or even college unless you have someone who has experience and can explain the book to you. There is a crew on a ship called the Nellie Waiting for the tide of the Thames River to push them out to sea. One of the crew members names is Marlow, and he is telling a story about his experience in Africa. The reason this book was confusing to me is beacuse there are two stories being told at the same time. This book changed the way I read books beacuse it makes you pay attention to every littkle detail in books and it takes you to another level.

    17 out of 18 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 3, 2012

    A tale to remember

    I thought that Heart of Darkness was an exceptional book that tells a story about the author’s trip to Africa. I was not sure if I was going to like it or not, until I was half way through the book, because Conrad does a lot of describing and it was a little hard to understand at first. The detail in the book is a key element because it paints a vivid picture for the reader. If reading this book I think that you should go paragraph by paragraph to analyze everything. This book has a touching ending that makes you really think about life. In the beginning of the book Conrad gives a unique perspective by making the narrator of the story the reader. As he wrote it he made a Russian doll effect, by making the reader tell the story to Marlow on a boat and of the story of Marlow’s trip to Africa. I didn’t like how Conrad jumped back between the atmosphere on the boat and what happened in the narration. I think it was hard in the beginning to tell which one was which. In order for Conrad to tell this chronicle in only seventy seven pages and pack a trip that took him a couple months, he had to make some fragment sentences. I think this was necessary but I didn’t like it. The beginning of the book was hard to get through because of the intense detail and futility. When it got closer to the end it was very intriguing and suspenseful. When I first started reading the book I predicted that the sea and the city London would have a big role in the upcoming events. Conrad describes it as a magnificent object that the crew looks up to. Conrad also describes London as a dark gloomy place and I thought that later in the story the “darkness” that they have left behind and the “heart” is the sea of the men’s travels. This was not exactly true but I think there are many “Heart’s of Darkness’” but the main one is the forest being the darkness and how it took over Kurtz’s heart. Overall this was a great story that everyone should read in there lifetime.

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 2, 2013

    Excellent book-terrible e-book

    This is a wonderful story. However, this edition of the book on my nook is terrible. There are misspellings and improper punctuation that are not in the original paper edition(s). Definitely not for a student who needs to quote passages.

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 10, 2012

    A great novel needs to take a toll on the reader. Works of darkn

    A great novel needs to take a toll on the reader. Works of darkness,
    oppression, and horror of this sort can easily become kitch and misuse
    the emotive pathos of wretched acts. This one stays plenty cohesive
    and focused. Conrad expertly reflects on the core of evil and plight.
    His expression of sin relentlessly strikes the reader with pain and
    embarrassment in one's species; in one's world. The quest for Kurtz
    parallels Conrad's descent into the heart of the matter as he gets
    closer to his ultimate revelation about the utter power of evil, or
    horror, of darkness. We find it is beyond humanity, it seethes from
    the maw of nature. If these themes seem relevant or intriguing to you,
    I recommend this powerful accomplishment of a novel.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 10, 2010

    The Heart of the Matter

    My advanced high school English course read Heart of Darkness this school year. At first look, the book appeared to be dull and uninteresting. After learning about Joseph Conrad's life as a seaman, I couldn't expect any less than a book about a seaman's adventure. Needless to say I was wrong about my first assumption. Old as it may be, this enlightening story is far from tedious.
    As we began reading the book, we started with some background notes. We made predictions and all I could draw from the book at that point was that it would be about an adventure at sea. We also questioned why Conrad used a quote from Rumplestiltskin as an epigram at its beginning. I figured out after reading it that he put it there to set the moral of the story; a human life is worth more than all the riches in the world.
    The story is set with Marlow, the main character, on the boat. He is talking about his adventure to meet the incomparable Mr. Kurtz, to his other shipmates and us the readers. The things he saw and the people he met filled this lively journey in to the heart of darkness. That being said, my one prediction was definitely being met while reading this book.
    As Marlow, the main character's, story unraveled paragraph by paragraph I started to understand what mental torture he was going through. It's a story you have to read slowly to get every single clue. Every part of the puzzle is crucial to understand this particular work of literature. I must say that it made an impact on me. It sharpened my reading comprehension skills and made other books much simpler in comparison. I know for sure that I will remember it, as I get older. I would most certainly recommend this book to anyone looking for a complex book to challenge them, and the movie as a companion.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 15, 2010

    A nice Challenge

    Heart of Darkness, written by Joseph Conrad, was originally published in 1899.
    This book is a mystery where the captain of a steamboat, Marlow, needs to find the rapidly deteriorating Kurtz who has delved deep into the center of the ivory trade. Marlow captains his steamboat up the Congo River in the late nineteenth century encountering new experiences as he goes along on his journey to find the Kurtz who at this time he idolizes.
    The story progresses quickly, as it is a novella, but because of this it can also be difficult to understand. Though it does progress quickly it does follow through without detours. In the novel the characters also change in their own ways. Marlow, who is also the narrator, changes his viewpoints and ideas of the world. Meanwhile Kurtz has been dwelling in the jungle and has changed everything to a complete opposite of what he was before. The jungle has almost reverted him to a more primitive human having a "heart of darkness" from the evil dealings in which he has partaken. The novella follows through these changes and helps a reader understand the plight of people turning to vices during this period when there is no structure.
    As the narrator is a captain, the novella is written in an English maritime style of writing using diction of the seas. The novel contains many nautical terms, which may confuse some readers but with patience they could be understood. This diction helps set the mood of being on a ship and helps the reader come close to living the story.
    I think most high school students would be able to read this book, although more reluctant readers will have a little more trouble wading through the diction and following the story.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 2, 2011

    Challenging and rather dry to read

    Joseph Conrad has a very unique, deep style of writing that forces the reader to look past the surface meaning of the book. In doing this, as a reader, you mustn't just read Heart of Darkness as if it were a normal book, you have to stop and analyze each and every sentence. If you were to just go through the book and not process the deeper meaning of each sentence then you're leaving out the most vital information. On that note, I would like to say that Heart of Darkness is a wonderful piece of literature to read in a class room environment. This is because the book challenges the mind of the reader and requires their full attention in order for them to understand the book. It also teaches the students many other literary terms. BUT, if you are looking for a book to read for pleasure, this is definitely not the book for you. As stated before Heart of Darkness requires you to analyze each and every sentence, this causes most people to lose interest in the book, including me. So, due to the fact that this is such a challenging piece of literature I would only recommend it if you were in a classroom setting.

    2 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 21, 2014

    The book itself is a wonderful read, however, this paperback ver

    The book itself is a wonderful read, however, this paperback version is hard to read with its irregular print and there are also no page numbers on the book which makes it very hard to read in class, being the reason I bought this book. Because this is a print-on-demand book, I was not able to return it to a local store and online (said by the sales representative) which makes me very frustrated. Overall this book is cheap and because the story is good, I recommend people reading it though if there's another purpose for reading this book besides personal enjoyment, I would highly recommend buying another version of this novel.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 1, 2015

    The man

    (He ate a dragon heart and is cursed by magic)Stabs Starfire again then kidnaps her to 'vaab' result two.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 1, 2015

    Pi

    Fk

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 28, 2015

    Zach

    Still, a human has to be in ice for over 15 minuits to freeze

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 28, 2015

    The other shadow rider

    Dissapates "retreat!"

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 28, 2015

    Th dragonete

    "Woow. This place awesomw! What is this?!" She picked up a rock in her mouth.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 1, 2015

    Storm

    (Kyros, we moved!)

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 26, 2015

    Hex

    "I'm Hex." She offered, uncertain of herself. Her cat ears flicked a bit uncomfortably.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 28, 2015

    Ivy

    Looks over at Amythist

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 26, 2015

    Mallory

    (I cant think of anything to say...)

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 26, 2015

    Grammar Polezi

    "Probably a scientific name. Anyway, it is still wrong Midna. And, I SEE A GRAMMATICAL MISTAKE IN YOUR SENTENCE!" He throws a different baton at her. "IT IS AN ANIMAL! NOT A ANIMAL!"

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 26, 2015

    Eragon

    Never had one.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 26, 2015

    Grammar Polezi

    He strokes his mustauche, waiting.

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