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Hearts of Stone
     

Hearts of Stone

5.0 2
by Southside Johnny & the Asbury Jukes
 

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Southside Johnny & the Asbury Jukes had earned enthusiastic reviews and a loyal fan following on the strength of their first two albums, I Don't Want to Go Home and This Time It's for Real, but in the minds of many listeners they were still the little brother band of their friend and occasional benefactor Bruce Springsteen, and their third LP, 1978's

Overview

Southside Johnny & the Asbury Jukes had earned enthusiastic reviews and a loyal fan following on the strength of their first two albums, I Don't Want to Go Home and This Time It's for Real, but in the minds of many listeners they were still the little brother band of their friend and occasional benefactor Bruce Springsteen, and their third LP, 1978's Hearts of Stone, was an ambitious attempt by Southside and company to define themselves and step out of Springsteen's shadow. Gone were the cover tunes, the guest vocalists, and the goofy liner notes, and in their place Hearts of Stone delivered a set of tight and furiously passionate R&B influenced rock & roll tunes played by a mighty 11-piece band featuring one of the strongest horn sections in rock. While Springsteen wrote two songs for this album -- "Talk to Me" and the heart-tugging title cut -- this album really belongs to Southside Johnny Lyon, who rarely if ever sang with the force, emotional impact, and shades of detail he brought to these sessions, and Steve Van Zandt, who wrote the bulk of the songs, produced and arranged the album, and lends a superb guitar solo to "Hearts of Stone." In some respects, Hearts of Stone sounds like a dry run for what Van Zandt would later achieve with his band Little Steven & the Disciples of Soul on their debut album, Men Without Women, but as good a frontman as Van Zandt may be, Lyon's vocal skills are noticeably stronger, and he never had a better showcase for his talents than he did with this edition of the Asbury Jukes (especially with Max Weinberg guesting on drums and the whole band playing at the top of their form). Hearts of Stone would mark the last collaboration between Southside Johnny and Steve Van Zandt before 1991's reunion Better Days, and they inarguably parted ways on a high note.

Product Details

Release Date:
03/20/1990
Label:
Sony
UPC:
0074643548823
catalogNumber:
35488

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Southside Johnny & the Asbury Jukes   Primary Artist
Allan Berger   Bass,Vocals,Group Member
Rick Gazda   Trumpet,Vocals,Group Member
Stan Harrison   Saxophone,Tenor Saxophone,Tenor (Vocal),Group Member
Southside Johnny   Vocals
Kevin Kavanaugh   Keyboards,Vocals,Group Member
Bamba   Trombone
Johnny Lyon   Guitar,Harmonica,Vocals
Bob Mucklin   Trumpet
Richie Rosenberg   Trombone,Vocals
Billy Rush   Guitar,Rhythm Guitar,Group Member
Steven Van Zandt   Guitar,Rhythm Guitar,Vocals
Max Weinberg   Drums,Group Member
Eddie Marion   Baritone Saxophone,Group Member
Rich Gazala   Trumpet
Bob Muckin   Trumpet,Group Member
Ed Manion   Saxophone,Vocals,Baritone (Vocal)

Technical Credits

Jack Malken   Engineer
Steven Van Zandt   Arranger,Producer
John Tobler   Liner Notes
Steve VanZandt   Producer
John Lyon   Composer

Customer Reviews

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Hearts of Stone 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
anyone who remembers when rock-and-blues was a joyous reason to sing and dance will appreciate hearts. talk to me is a gem. southside is more fun than the boss. this is good ol' roll down the car windows and pop a cold one rock. enjoy.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I saw Southside in (where else?) Jersey recently, and had to purchase Hearts of Stone on CD, as I own the album and only a greatest hits compilation on CD. Talk to Me and Trapped Again are classic Jersey rock n roll masterpieces, ripe and oozing with grinding guitar riffs and powerful horns. The 2006 Jukes, proud to say, have not lost their magic. Southside play a mean hamonica and his vocals are as raw and throbbing as ever.