Heartsblood

Heartsblood

3.0 1
by David Petersen
     
 
In Heartsblood, nationally acclaimed nature writer and veteran outdoorsman David Petersen takes a clear-eyed look at humans and hunting, and reaches conclusions sure to challenge everyone's preconceptions. He draws clear distinctions between true hunting and contemporary hunter behavior, praising what's right about the former and damning what's wrong with the latter.

Overview

In Heartsblood, nationally acclaimed nature writer and veteran outdoorsman David Petersen takes a clear-eyed look at humans and hunting, and reaches conclusions sure to challenge everyone's preconceptions. He draws clear distinctions between true hunting and contemporary hunter behavior, praising what's right about the former and damning what's wrong with the latter. Along with his extensive personal experience, Petersen draws on philosophy, evolutionary science, biology, and empirical studies to create an engaging and literate work that offers a unique look at hunting, hunters, anti-hunting, and, in the words of the author, "life's basic truths."

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780981658445
Publisher:
David Petersen Books
Publication date:
07/15/2010
Pages:
290
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.65(d)

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Heartsblood 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I am not very fond of the book. The writing is broken down into small sections often with little or no flow between them. Also the author does just as the reviews suggest. He praises that which he agrees with and bashes that which he doesn't. To the point that the good points he makes are lost amongst the poor writing and less than agreeable way of holding certain practices  over others in terms of value. If he had limited this to phrasing that indicated that it was more his opinion than fact I would have been  more inclined to accept much of what he wrote. Such as one of the things he regularly bashes is hunters who buy and make  use of 'gadgets'. While I see his point to one extent, I know that to develop the level of expertise that you should have to not use those  'gadgets' can be so daunting as to prevent people from trying hunting to begin with. If you need a GPS for in the woods, take one. If your level of expertise requires a modern crossbow with a scope, use it. If that is what it takes for you to land a clean ethical shot  then by all means use the technology you can afford. The idea of using such 'gadgets' seems to be a bridge he cannot cross. A hard line I just do not see as he does. There are some nice stories that help put you into his practice, but not enough to fill out the book and increase the overall value I was able to take from it. Perhaps if I was not already a hunter I would have taken more from the book.