The Heath Anthology of American Literature: Volume B: Early Nineteenth Century: 1800-1865 / Edition 6

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Overview

Unrivaled diversity and teachability have made The Heath Anthology a best-selling text. In presenting a more inclusive canon of American literature, The Heath Anthology changed the way American literature is taught. The Sixth Edition continues to balance the traditional, leading names in American literature with lesser-known writers and have built upon the anthology's other strengths: its apparatus and its ancillaries.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780547204192
  • Publisher: Cengage Learning
  • Publication date: 7/25/2008
  • Series: Heath Anthologies Series
  • Edition description: Older Edition
  • Edition number: 6
  • Pages: 3178
  • Sales rank: 653,641
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Paul Lauter is the Smith Professor of Literature at Trinity College. He has served as president of the American Studies Association and is a major figure in the revision of the American literary canon.

Richard Yarborough is Professor of English and African American Studies at the University of California-Los Angeles. His work focuses on African American literature and on the construction of race in U.S. culture. He directs the University Press of New England's Library of Black Literature series.

John Alberti teaches at Northern Kentucky University and has a Ph.D. in American literature from UCLA. His main area of research is multicultural American literature and culture.

Mary Pat Brady teaches U.S. Literature. She has written extensively on contemporary U.S. Latino literature.

Dr. Bryer is an expert on F. Scott Fitzgerald and is president of the International F. Scott Fitzgerald Society. He was an editor of DEAR SCOTT, DEAREST ZELDA: THE LOVE LETTERS OF F. SCOTT AND ZELDA FITZGERALD (Macmillan).

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Table of Contents

EARLY NINETEENTH CENTURY, 1800-1865 Patterns of Development and Conflict Native America Major George Lowery (Cherokee) (c.1770-1852) Notable Persons in Cherokee History: Sequoyah or George Gist Elias Boudinot (Cherokee) (c. 1802-1839) An Address to the Whites John Ross (Cherokee) (1790-1866) Letter to Lewis Cass, February 14, 1833 Letter to Andrew Jackson, March 28, 1834 ["Letter to a Friend" is found in the Cluster: Expansion and Removal on page 000] Seattle (Duwamish) (1786-1866) Speech of Chief Seattle John Wannuaucon Quinney (Mahican) (1797-1855) Quinney's Speech William Apess (Pequot) (1798-?) An Indian's Looking-Glass for the White Man from Eulogy on King Philip Jane Johnston Schoolcraft (Ojibwa) (1800-1841) To the Pine Tree Lines Written at Castle Island, Lake Superior Invocation: To My Maternal Grand-Father on Hearing His Descent from Chippewa Ancestors Misrepresented By an Ojibwa Female Pen, Invitation to sisters to a walk in the Garden, after a shower The Contrast To my ever beloved and lamented Son William Henry On leaving my children John and Jane at School, in the Atlantic states, and preparing to return to the interior —Ojibwa —Free Translation (Henry Rowe Schoolcraft, 1839) —New Translation (Dennis Jones, Heidi Stark, and James Vukelich, 2005) Moowis, The Indian Coquette Mishösha, or the Magician and his daughters: A Chippewa Tale The Forsaken Brother: A Chippewa Tale The Little Spirit, or Boy-Man: An Ojibwa Tale The O-jib-way Maid Two Songs George Copway (Kah-ge-ga-gah-bowh; Ojibwa) (1818-1869) from The Life of Kah-ge-ga-gah-bowh John Rollin Ridge (Cherokee) (1827-1867) Oppression of Digger Indians The Atlantic Cable The Stolen White Girl A Scene Along the Rio de la Plumas Cluster: Expansion and Removal James Monroe (1758-1831), The Monroe Doctrine Chief Justice John Marshall (1755-1835), Decision in Cherokee Nation v. GA Chief Justice John Marshall (1755-1835), Decision in Worcester v. GA Andrew Jackson (1767-1845), President Jackson's Message to Congress "On Indian Removal" Chief John Ross (1790-1866), Letter to a Friend, 1836 Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), Letter to Martin Van Buren, President of the United States Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo John L. O'Sullivan (1813-1895) or Jane McManus Storm Cazneau (1807-1878), Annexation Herman Melville (1819-1891), The Metaphysics of Indian Hating Spanish America Tales from the Hispanic Southwest La comadre Sebastiana/Do a Sebastiana Los tres hermanos/The Three Brothers El obispo/The New Bishop El indito de las cien vacas/The Indian and the Hundred Cows La Llorona, Malinche, and Guadalupe La Llorona, La Malinche, and the Unfaithful Maria The Devil Woman Lorenzo de Zavala (1788-1836) Viage a los Estados-Unidos del Norte America (Journey to the United States) Narratives from the Mexican and Early American Southwest Pio Pico (1801-1894) from Historical Narrative Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo (1808-1890) from Recuerdos historicos y personales tocante a la alta California Richard Henry Dana, Jr. (1815-1882) from Two Years before the Mast and Twenty-Four Years After Alfred Robinson (1806-1895) from Life in California Josiah Gregg (1806-1850) Commerce of the Prairies 5. New Mexico 7. Domestic Animals 8. Arts and Crafts 9. The People Frederick Law Olmsted (1822-1903) A Journey Through Texas San Antonio The Missions Town Life The Mexicans in Texas Cluster: Religion and Spirituality: Nature, God, and Culture Red Jacket (c. 1758-1830), On the Religion of the White Man and the Red William Ellery Channing (1730-1842), Introductory Remarks to the Collected Works of William Ellery Channing George Ripley (1802-1880), Review of Jane Martineau's Rationale of Religious Inquiry Andrews Norton (1786-1853), A Discourse on the Latest Form of Infidelity Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), Divinity School Address Emily Dickinson (1830-1886), [I'm ceded—I've stopped being Theirs—] Isaac Harby (1788-1828), A Discourse... for promoting the true Principles of Judaism... Lyman Beecher (1775-1863), A Plea for the West Brigham Young (1801-1877), Discourses Lydia Howard Huntley Sigourney (1791-1865), Hymn: Onward, onward, men of Heaven Catherine E. Beecher (1800-1878) and Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811-1896), The American Woman's Home Louisa May Alcott (1832-1888), Hymn: A little kingdom I possess The Cultures of New England Lydia Howard Huntley Sigourney (1791-1865) The Suttee Death of an Infant To the First Slave Ship Remonstrance of the Creek Indians Against Being Removed from Their Own Territory The Indian's Welcome to the Pilgrim Fathers Indian Names Niagara To a Shred of Linen The Indian Summer Fallen Forests Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882) Nature The American Scholar Self-Reliance Experience Concord Hymn The Rhodora The Snow-Storm Compensation Hamatreya Merlin Brahma Days Terminus [Letter to Martin Van Buren, President of the United States is found in Cluster: Expansion and Removal on page 00] [Divinity School Address is found in Cluster: Religion and Spirituality on page 00] [The Poet is found in Cluster: Aesthetics on page 00] John Greenleaf Whittier (1807-1892) The Hunters of Men The Farewell Massachusetts to Virginia At Port Royal [ No Slave Hunt in our Borders! is found in Cluster: E Pluribus Unum on page 00] Sarah Margaret Fuller (1810-1850) To [Sophia Ripley?] from Woman in the Nineteenth Century from American Literature; Its Position in the Present Time, and Prospects for the Future from Things and Thoughts in Europe, Foreign Correspondence of the Tribune Dispatch 17 Dispatch 18 Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) Resistance to Civil Government from Walden Where I Lived, and What I Lived For Higher Laws Spring Conclusion A Plea for Captain John Brown Walking Cluster: E Pluribus Unum—Race and Slavery John Quincy Adams (1767-1848), Diary (1820) Thomas Roderick Dew (1802-1846), An Argument Upholding Slavery Angela Davis b. 1944, Reflections on the Black Woman's Role in the Community of Slaves Levi Coffin (1798-1877), Reminiscences of Levi Coffin, the Reputed President of the Underground Railroad William Lloyd Garrison (1805-1879), Declaration of Sentiments of the American Anti-Slavery Convention Thornton Stringfellow (1788-1869), A Brief Examination of Scripture Testimony on the Institution of Slavery Leon Litwack b. 1929, North of Slavery: The Negro in the Free States, 1790-1860 Fugitive Slave Act (1850) Lydia Maria Child (1802-1880), The Duty of Disobedience to the Fugitive Slave Act: An Appeal to the Legislators of Massachusetts John Greenleaf Whittier (1807-1892), No Slave Hunt in our Borders! Martin R. Delaney (1812-1885) and Frederick Douglass (1818-1895), An Exchange George Fitzhugh (1806-1881), Sociology of the South Chief Justice Roger B. Taney (1777-1864), Dred Scott Decision John Brown (1880-1859), John Brown's Last Speech and Letters Mortimer Thomson (1831-1875), Great Auction Sale of Slaves at Savannah, Georgia Race, Slavery, and the Invention of the "South" David Walker (1785-1830) from Appeal... to the Coloured Citizens of the World (third edition, 1829) William Lloyd Garrison (1805-1879) from William Lloyd Garrison: The Story of His Life Editorial from the first issue of The Liberator Lydia Maria Child (1802-1880) Appeal in Favor of that Class of Americans Called Africans Preface Chapter VIII Letters from New York #14 [17]: [Homelessness] # 20 [27]" [Birds] #33 [Antiabolitionist mobs] #34 [50, 51] [Women's Rights] [The Duty of Disobedience to the Fugitive Slave Act: An Appeal to the Legislators of Massachusetts is found in Cluster: E Pluribus Unum on page 00.] Angelina Grimke (1805-1879) from Appeal to the Christian Women of the South Henry Highland Garnet (1815-1882) An Address to the Slaves of the United States of America, Buffalo, N.Y., 1843 Frederick Douglass (1818-1895) Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July? [An Exchange with M. Delany is found in Cluster: E Pluribus Unum on page 00.] Nancy Gardner Prince (1799-1856?) from A Narrative of the Life and Travels of Mrs. Nancy Prince Caroline Lee Hentz (1800-1856) from The Planter's Northern Bride George Fitzhugh (1804-1881) from Southern Thought Frances Ellen Watkins Harper (1825-1911) The Slave Mother The Tennessee Hero Free Labor An Appeal to the American People The Colored People in America Speech: On the Twenty-Fourth Anniversary of the American Anti-Slavery Society The Two Offers Thomas Wentworth Higginson (1823-1911) from Nat Turner's Insurrection Letter to Mrs. Higginson on Emily Dickinson Harriet Ann Jacobs (1813-1897) from Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl Chapter I: Childhood Chapter VI: The Jealous Mistress Chapter X: A Perilous Passage in the Slave Girls Life Chapter XVI: Scenes at the Plantation Chapter XXI: The Loophole of Retreat Chapter XLI: Free at Last Harriet Jacobs to Ednah Dow Cheney, April 25, 1867 Mary Boykin Chesnut (1823-1886) Mary Chesnut's Civil War March 18, 1861 August 26, 1861 October 13, 1861 October 20, 1861 January 16, 1865 January 17, 1865 Wendell Phillips (1811-1884) from Toussaint L'Ouverture Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865) Address at the Dedication of the Gettysburg National Cemetery Second Inaugural Address What's w/ N Hawthorne letters? Literature and "The Woman Question" Sarah Moore Grimke (1792-1873) from Letters on the Equality of the Sexes, and the Condition of Woman Letter VIII: The Condition of Women in the United States Letter XV: Man Equally Guilty with Woman in the Fall Angelina Grimke (1805-1879) from Letters to Catharine Beecher Letter XI Letter XII: Human Rights Not Founded on Sex [from Appeal to the Christian Women of the South found in Race, Slavery and the Invention of the "South" on page 00.] Sojourner Truth (c. 1797-1883) Reminiscences by Frances D. Gage of Sojourner Truth, for May 28-29, 1851 Sojourner Truth's Speech at the Akron, Ohio, Women's Rights Meeting Speech at New York City Convention Address to the First Annual Meeting of the American Equal Rights Association Fanny Fern (Sara Willis Parton) (1811-1872) Hints to Young Wives from Fern Leaves, 1st Series Thanksgiving Story from Fern Leaves, 2nd Series Soliloquy of a Housemaid Critics Mrs. Adolphus Smith Sporting the "Blue Stocking" Male Criticism on Ladies' Books A Law More Nice Than Just Independence The Working-Girls of New York Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815-1902) from Eighty Years and More: Reminiscences Declaration of Sentiments The Development of Narrative A Sheaf of Humor of the Old Southwest Davy Crockett (1786-1836), The Crockett Almanacs: Sunrise in His Pocket; A Pretty Predicament; Crockett's Daughters Mike Fink (1770?-1823?), The Crocket Almanacs: Mike Fink's Brag; Mike Fink Trying to Scare Mrs. Crockett; Sal Fink, the Mississippi Screamer, How She Cooked Injuns; The Death of Mike Fink (recorded by Joseph M. Field) Augustus Baldwin Longstreet 1790-1870), The Horse Swap George Washington Harris (1814-1869), Mrs. Yardley's Quilting Washington Irving (1783-1859) from A History of New York Book I, Chapter 5 Rip Van Winkle The Legend of Sleepy Hollow James Fenimore Cooper (1789-1851) from The Pioneers, or the Sources of the Susquehanna; A Descriptive Tale Chapter XXI Chapter XXII Chapter XXIII Catharine Maria Sedgwick (1789-1867) Hope Leslie from Volume 1, Chapter 7 from Volume 2, Chapter 1 from Volume 2, Chapter 8 Caroline Kirkland (1801-1864) A New Home—Who'll Follow? Preface Preface to the Fourth Edition Chapter I Chapter XV Chapter XVII Chapter XXVII Chapter XLIII Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864) My Kinsman, Major Molineux Alice Doane's Appeal Young Goodman Brown The Minister's Black Veil The Birth-mark Rappaccini's Daughter Mrs. Hutchinson from Abraham Lincoln (March-April 1862) Letters To Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, June 4, 1837 To Sophia Peabody, April 13, 1841 To H.W. Longfellow, June 5, 1849 To J.T. Fields, January 20, 1850 To J.T. Fields, Undated draft To H.W. Longfellow, January 2, 1864 [Preface to The House of Seven Gables is found in the Cluster: Aesthetics—Poetry and Society on page 000] Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849) Ligeia The Fall of the House of Usher The Man of the Crowd The Tell-Tale Heart The Black Cat The Purloined Letter The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar The Philosophy of Composition Sonnet—To Science Romance To Helen Israfel The City in the Sea The Sleeper Bridal Ballad Sonnet—Silence Dream-Land The Raven Ulalume Annabel Lee Parody: Samuel Brown by Phoebe Cary Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811-1896) Uncle Tom's Cabin Chapter I: In Which the Reader Is Introduced to a Man of Humanity Chapter VII: The Mother's Struggle Chapter XI: In Which Property Gets into an Improper State of Mind Chapter XIII: The Quaker Settlement Chapter XIV: Evangeline Chapter XL: The Martyr Chapter XLI: The Young Master from Preface to the First Illustrated Edition of Uncle Tom's Cabin from The Minister's Wooing XXIII: Views of Divine Government Sojourner Truth, the Libyan Sibyl William Wells Brown (1815-1884) Clotelle; or, The Colored Heroine Chapter II: The Negro Sale Chapter X: The Quadroon's Home Chapter XI: To-Day a Mistress, To-Morrow a Slave Chapter XVIII: A Slave-Hunting Parson Herman Melville (1819-1891) Bartleby, the Scrivener The Paradise of Bachelors and the Tartarus of Maids I. The Paradise of Bachelors II. The Tartarus of Maids Benito Cereno Billy Budd, Sailor Hawthorne and His Mosses Battle-Pieces and Aspects of the War The Portent (1859) A Utilitarian View of the Monitors Fight The Maldive Shark from Timoleon Monody Art [The Metaphysics of Indian Hating is found in Cluster: Expansion and Removal on page 00.] [Letter to Nathaniel Hawthorne is found in Cluster: Aesthetics on page 00.] Julia Ward Howe (1819-1910) From The Hermaphrodite Mind Versus Mill Stream The Heart's Astronomy The Battle Hymn of the Republic Alice Cary (1820-1871) Clovernook, First Series Preface Clovernook, Second Series Uncle Christopher's [Conclusion is found in the Cluster: Aesthetics—Poetry and Society on page 000] Elizabeth Stoddard (1823-1902) Lemorne Versus Huell Rebecca Harding Davis (1831-1910) Life in the Iron Mills Cluster: Aesthetics—Poetry and Society Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), The Poet Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), The Poetic Principle Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864), Preface to The House of the Seven Gables Herman Melville (1819-1891), Letter to Nathaniel Hawthorne Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811-1896), "Concluding Remarks" to Uncle Tom's Cabin Alice Cary (1820-1871), "Conclusion" to Clovernook, Second Series (1853) Lydia Huntley Sigourney (1791-1865), Letters of Life Emily Dickinson (1830-1886), "Publication—is the Auction" Walt Whitman (1819-1892), Democratic Vistas The Emergence of American Poetic Voices Songs and Ballads Songs of the Slaves Lay Dis Body Down Nobody Knows the Trouble I've Had Deep River Roll, Jordan, Roll Michael Row the Boat Ashore Steal Away to Jesus There's a Meeting Here To-Night Many Thousand Go Go Down, Moses Didn't My Lord Deliver Daniel Songs of White Communities John Brown's Body Pat Works on the Railway Sweet Betsy from Pike Bury Me Not On the Lone Prairie Shenandoah Clementine Acres of Clams Cindy Paper of Pins Come Home, Father (Henry Clay Work) Life Is a Toil William Cullen Bryant (1794-1878) Thanatopsis The Yellow Violet To a Waterfowl To Cole, the Painter, Departing for Europe To the Fringed Gentian The Prairies Abraham Lincoln Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807-1882) A Psalm of Life [Parody: A Psalm of Life by Phoebe Cary] The Warning The Arsenal at Springfield The Jewish Cemetery at Newport Aftermath Chaucer The Harvest Moon Nature The Tide Rises, The Tide Falls Frances Sargent Locke Osgood (1811-1850) Ellen Learning to Walk The Little Hand The Maiden's Mistake Oh! Hasten to My Side A Reply Lines (Suggested by the announcement that "A bill for the Protection of the Property of Married Women has passed both Houses" of our State Legislature) Woman Little Children To a Slandered Poetess The Indian Maid's Reply to the Missionary The Hand That Swept the Sounding Lyre The Wraith of the Rose Walt Whitman (1819-1892) Leaves of Grass Preface to the 1855 Edition Song of Myself (1855 version) The Sleepers from Inscriptions One's-Self I Sing I Hear America Singing from Children of Adam To the Garden the World A Woman Waits for Me from Calamus In Paths Untrodden Recorders Ages Hence When I Heard at the Close of the Day I Saw in Louisiana a Live-Oak Growing Here the Frailest Leaves of Me I Dream'd in a Dream Crossing Brooklyn Ferry from Sea-Drift Out of the Cradle Endlessly Rocking from By the Roadside Europe, the 72d and 73d Years of These States When I Heard the Learn'd Astronomer To a President The Dalliance of the Eagles To the States from Drum-Taps Beat! Beat! Drums! Cavalry Crossing a Ford Vigil Strange I Kept on the Field One Night A March in the Ranks Hard-Prest, and the Road Unknown Year That Trembled and Reel'd Beneath Me The Wound-Dresser Ethiopia Saluting the Colors Reconciliation As I Lay with My Head in Your Lap Camerado from Memories of President Lincoln When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd from Autumn Rivulets Sparkles from the Wheel Prayer of Columbus from Whispers of Heavenly Death Quicksand Years A Noiseless Patient Spider from From Noon to Starry Night To a Locomotive in Winter from Songs of Parting So Long! from Sands at Seventy (First Annex) Yonnondio from Good-bye My Fancy (Second Annex) Good-bye My Fancy! Respondez! [Poem Deleted from Leaves of Grass] from Democratic Vistas (1871) Phoebe Cary (1824-1871) [Parody: Samuel Brown is found in Edgar Allan Poe section on page 000] [Psalm: A Psalm of Life is found in the Longfellow section on page 000] The Life of Trial Worser Moments The City Life Jacob Emily Dickinson (1830-1886) Poems [One Sister have I in our house] [I never lost as much but twice] [Success is counted sweetest] [Her breast is fit for pearls] [These are the days when Birds come back—] [Come slowly—Eden!] [Did the Harebell loose her girdle] [I like the look of Agony] [Wild Nights—Wild Nights!] [I can wade Grief—] [There's a certain Slant of light] [I felt a Funeral, in my Brain] [I'm Nobody! Who are you?] [If your Nerve, deny you—] [Your Riches—taught me—Poverty.] [I reason, Earth is short—] [The Soul selects her own Society—] The Soul's Superior instants] [I send Two Sunsets—] [It sifts from Leaden Sieves] [There came a Day at Summer's full] [Some keep the Sabbath going to Church] [A Bird came down the Walk—] [I know that He exists.] [After great pain, a formal feeling comes—] [God is a distant—stately Lover—] [Dare you see a Soul at the White Heat? ] [What Soft—Cherubic Creatures—] [Much Madness is divinest Sense—] [This is my letter to the world] [I tie my Hat—I crease my Shawl] [I showed her Hights she never saw—] [This was a Poet—It is That—] [I heard a Fly buzz—when I died—] [This world is not Conclusion] [Her sweet Weight on my Heart a Night] [I started Early—Took my Dog—] [One Crucifixion is recorded—only—] [I reckon—when I count at all—] [I had been hungry, all the Years—] [Empty my Heart, of Thee] [They shut me up in Prose—] [Ourselves were wed one summer—dear—] [The Brain—is wider than the Sky—] [I cannot live with You—] [I dwell in Possibility—] [Of all the Souls that stand create—] [One need not be a Chamber—to be Haunted—] [Essential Oils—are wrung—] [They say that "Time Assuages"—] [Publication—is the Auction] [Because I could not stop for Death—] [She rose to His Requirement—dropt] [My Life had stood—a Loaded Gun—] [Presentiment—is that long Shadow—on the Lawn—] [This Consciousness that is aware] [The Poets light but Lamps] [The Missing All, prevented Me] [A narrow Fellow in the Grass] [Perception of an object costs] [Title divine—is mine!] [The Bustle in a House] [Revolution is the Pod] [Tell all the Truth but tell it slant—] [He preached upon "Breadth" till it argued him narrow—] [Not with a Club, the Heart is broken] [What mystery pervades a well!] [A Counterfeit—a Plated Person—] ["Heavenly Father"—take to thee] [A Route of Evanescence] [The Bible is an Antique Volume—] [Volcanoes be in Sicily] [Rearrange a "Wife's" affection!] [To make a prairie it takes a clover and one bee]. Letters To Abiah Root (January 29, 1850) To Austin Dickinson (October 17, 1851) To Susan Gilbert (Dickinson) (late April 1852) To Susan Gilbert (Dickinson) (June 27, 1852) To Samuel Bowles (about February 1861) To recipient unknown (about 1861), To Susan Gilbert Dickinson (date uncertain) To T.W. Higginson (April 15, 1862) To T.W. Higginson (April 25, 1862) To T.W. Higginson (June 7, 1862) To T.W. Higginson (July 1862) To Mrs. J.G. Holland (early May 1866) To Susan Gilbert Dickinson (about 1870) To Susan Gilbert Dickinson (about 1870) To T.W. Higginson (1876) To Otis P. Lord [rough draft] (about 1878) To Susan Gilbert Dickinson (about 1878) To Susan Gilbert Dickinson (early October 1883) To Susan Gilbert Dickinson (about 1884) Acknowledgements Index of Authors, Titles, and First Lines of Poems

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