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Heaven Is Real: Lessons on Earthly Joy - from the Man Who Spent 90 Minutes in Heaven
     

Heaven Is Real: Lessons on Earthly Joy - from the Man Who Spent 90 Minutes in Heaven

4.1 11
by Don Piper, Cecil Murphey
 

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New inspiration from the million-copy bestselling author of 90 Minutes in Heaven.

Don Piper's 90 Minutes in Heaven has sold more than a million copies and has been translated into 12 languages. Now, from "The Minister of Hope" comes the follow-up that millions of readers have been waiting for.

On January 18th, 1989, Don Piper died in a car

Overview

New inspiration from the million-copy bestselling author of 90 Minutes in Heaven.

Don Piper's 90 Minutes in Heaven has sold more than a million copies and has been translated into 12 languages. Now, from "The Minister of Hope" comes the follow-up that millions of readers have been waiting for.

On January 18th, 1989, Don Piper died in a car accident. Ninety minutes later, after a preacher prayed over him, Piper came back to life with an extraordinary story. He'd been to heaven. So began the phenomenon of 90 Minutes in Heaven.

Now, for the millions who look to him for inspiration, Piper offers the hope that if he could survive his ordeal after the accident, then others can survive whatever life circumstances they're going through and grow in God's love through the experience. For Piper, heaven is a certainty-and so is God's grace. Relying on that assurance, believers can transform pain into purpose and troubles into blessings, finding joy in life even when life turns out not to be what they expected.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Piper, well-known for his Christian bestseller 90 Minutes in Heaven, with over 1.4 million copies in print, takes his dramatic story one step further by describing the lessons he's learned since he died on a bridge in Texas in 1989. Piper didn't stay dead, but instead returned from the gates of heaven a changed man. "I left the bridge different than I had been when I started across," he says. Piper uses the bridge metaphor throughout, describing his salvation as the first bridge he crossed, then the traversal of another bridge to a "new normal" after accepting that his life was forever altered. Other journeys discussed include the bridge to compassion and the final bridge to heaven (for good this time). Undergirded with e-mails and letters from people who have read his book or heard him speak, Piper also leans heavily on the example of the Apostle Paul and the New Testament book of Philippians. Although the messages can be repetitive and the writing uninspired, Piper's story is astounding and his life lessons are real: focus on the eternal, find the humor, accept help, give thanks and just hold on. (Aug. 7)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781594152818
Publisher:
Gale Group
Publication date:
01/15/2009
Edition description:
Large Print
Pages:
352
Product dimensions:
5.40(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.90(d)
Age Range:
17 Years

Meet the Author

Don Piper is an internationally recognized evangelist who has worked for Pat Robertson's CBN-TV affiliate in Texas.

Cecil Murphey has published over 100 books. He holds a Masters of Divinity from the Columbia Theological Seminary.

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Heaven Is Real 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 11 reviews.
bestpotterfan More than 1 year ago
.... that no one can enter into Heaven unless they accept Jesus as their Lord and Savior. For those of you that find that offensive, look it up for yourself. As Christians, we call your denial a convicted spirit. Once you accept Jesus that conviction goes away and you will know Gods love and peace and all the blessings that are awaiting you. Dont knock it till you try it!
hpyeduc8r More than 1 year ago
The book's content completely supported its title, "Heaven Is Real". It also contained great connections to the first book, "Ninety Minutes In Heaven". Don Piper has lead an incredible life with an amazing journey. It witnesses to all who read his books. "Heaven Is Real" completes the journey the reader began in "Ninety Minutes In Heaven". I highly reccomend it. You won't be able to put it down!
Joyachiever More than 1 year ago
One of the reasons that the book 90 Minutes In Heaven by Don Piper with Cecil Murphy appealed to me is stemmed from part of my intent to increase my understanding of both traditional religion and new age ideas on heaven towards my intent of writing under a username (that definitely is not going to involve the word star). Some of the strong and compelling points of this book; Piper goes into what he saw and felt during his time in heaven for chapter two. Pages 78-79 capture his truth of admitting that there was a time where he wanted to go back to heaven and found little comfort in various psychiatrists trying to talk to him on how he was doing. Pages 130-131 and 134-135-Piper’s discussion with a man who was one of the many who helped pray him back to life and their sense of spiritual urgency. Piper also recalls that whoever might have been holding his hand during the car crash was a benevolent spirit from heaven (i.e. maybe an angel). Pages 148-152; Other members of Don Piper’s family recall what went through their minds and hearts during and in the aftermath of the events surrounding his recovery (i.e. Piper’s children Nicole, Joe, and Chris as well as his wife Eva). Pages 166-167; Piper shares how he met his wife Eva at Louisiana State University and the dramatic story of how a person at of his events unexpectedly died soon after at just 20 years of age (to the shock of multiple students who knew him). The only catch is that there are only some pages out of the 207 page book that covers his time in heaven, however it was still a gripping read. There is more that is tempting to say about this book, but my conscience is guiding me to put aside my own personal spiritual biases out of consideration for the author, other reasons, and a major confession on one major reason why; I admit that I controversially believe in the idea of various realms within heaven and hell even with my interest in the new age and occult arenas, but I believe that there are spirits that are allowed to ascend from the lower darker realms (i.e. the realms in what is called hell) after a period of time depending on the person’s soul and intent to spiritually grow (kind of how a reformed criminal is allowed out of prison after showing the potential to change, but my heart and conscience is guiding me to avoid publicly sharing more within this review). However, I’m still grateful to have come across this book because it helped remind me that I’m more than how I feel on my human ego side when it comes to sometimes feeling prejudged based on my perceived work in progress intelligence/progressing wisdom and a reminder to instead be more grateful/self-confident for what I already have (in addition, the book served as a healing reminder for me to more carefully have my spiritual life be more of a prominent guide as I pursue certain career goals).
NHIL More than 1 year ago
I borrowed this book from my public library and listened to the Unabridged book on CD as I read it. I like the way Piper repeatedly references the "new normal." While events in my life are certainly vastly different from his, it certainly helped me to put into perspective the bridges I have had to cross. It is a perfect companion book to his NINETY MINUTES IN HEAVEN. I recommend reading 90 MINUTES first,then this book. I feel both books are must-reads.
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reading-a-lot-lately More than 1 year ago
Eh
BKM408 More than 1 year ago
I couldn't finish the book. Its implication that only those who accept Jesus Christ as their Lord and Saviour will be admitted to heaven was completely offensive to me. It is an evangelical diatribe couched as a feel-good book about the promise of heaven. Totally obnoxious.