Heaven Up Here [Bonus Tracks]

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Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Lydia Vanderloo
Don't be fooled by the serene cover: Heaven Up Here is all about the depths of depression and the stranglehold of anxiety. Building upon the sonic foundation they laid with their debut, Crocodiles, Liverpool quartet Echo & the Bunnymen continue to define their distinctive post-punk sound on this 1981 album, setting the tone with ringing guitars, unsettling rhythms, and Ian McCulloch's soul-searching lyrics and soul-venting delivery. "Some crave for heaven, while we live in hell," the famously coiffed singer laments in the eerie "The Disease," sounding like Robert Smith caught on an especially bad day. Meanwhile, guitarist Will Sergeant was further developing his ...
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Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble - Lydia Vanderloo
Don't be fooled by the serene cover: Heaven Up Here is all about the depths of depression and the stranglehold of anxiety. Building upon the sonic foundation they laid with their debut, Crocodiles, Liverpool quartet Echo & the Bunnymen continue to define their distinctive post-punk sound on this 1981 album, setting the tone with ringing guitars, unsettling rhythms, and Ian McCulloch's soul-searching lyrics and soul-venting delivery. "Some crave for heaven, while we live in hell," the famously coiffed singer laments in the eerie "The Disease," sounding like Robert Smith caught on an especially bad day. Meanwhile, guitarist Will Sergeant was further developing his distinctive style, flaunting his ear for both Church-like sonics "With a Hip" and Smiths-like hooks "A Promise". With its Eno-derived guitar sound, "All My Colours" was really a showcase for the Bunnymen's rhythm section, especially drummer Pete De Freitas, which had long since given the band an edge over their peers. The extra tracks fleshing out this deluxe 2004 reissue include the seven-minute rhythmic workout "Broke My Neck," a B-side, and four live tracks recorded in Australia in late '81. It's a vibrant encapsulation of their stage show at the time; all forces joined with particular force on "All I Want." Although it lives and breathes doom and gloom, Heaven Up Here manages rise above the abyss, buoyed by determination and inspiration.
All Music Guide
Following their more psychedelia-based debut, Crocodiles, and subsequent "Puppet" single, Echo & the Bunnymen returned in 1981 with the darkest and perhaps most experimental album of their career. Heaven Up Here lacks the signature hooks and melodies that would make the Bunnymen famous, showcasing instead a dirge-like songwriting approach built around the circular rhythms of bassist Les Pattinson and drummer Pete DeFreitas. In this setting, the band remarkably flourishes, although they would go on to greater heights by scaling back the album's extremism. Heaven Up Here's strength is the way in which the Bunnymen seamlessly work together to shape each song's dynamics the tension underlying the crescendo of "Turquoise Days" being a prime example. Ian McCulloch, having found his trademark confidence, sings with soaring abandon and passion throughout the album. Similarly, Will Sergeant's guitar playing, notably freed from verse-chorus structure and pop riffs, is at its angular finest; his playing on "No Dark Things" is pure Andy Gill-esque skronk. The album's opening troika of "Show of Strength," "With a Hip," and "Over the Wall" the latter with its jarring, direct invocation of Del Shannon's "Runaway" are particularly effective, establishing the theme of distrust and restlessness which continues throughout the album. Indeed, even the album's lone single, "A Promise," is hardly light, pop material. But the message underneath that darkness, especially in McCulloch's lyrics, is a call to overcome rather than wallow, as the album ends with the relatively euphoric "All I Want." Sitting comfortably next to the pioneering work of contemporaries like Joy Division/New Order, and early Public Image Ltd. and Cure, this is a rather fine -- and in the end, influential -- example of atmospheric post-punk. Having reached the British Top Ten, Heaven Up Here is highly regarded among Echo & the Bunnymen's fans precisely for the reasons which, on the surface, make it one of the least accessible albums in the band's catalog. [The 2004 reissue of Heaven Up Here boasts improved sound, new liner notes, lots of photos, and bonus tracks. Chief among these are live renditons of tracks from the album "Show of Strength," "The Disease," "All I Want," and "Zimbo" recorded in Australia in November of 1981. They are raw and energetic, the sound of an exciting rock band in its prime. Also included is the B-side to "A Promise," the long version of the dark and meandering and very Gang of Four-sounding "Broke My Neck."] ~ Aaron Warshaw & Tim Sendra
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 1/27/2004
  • Label: Rhino
  • UPC: 825646116225
  • Catalog Number: 61162

Tracks

Disc 1
  1. 1 Show of Strength (4:50)
  2. 2 With a Hip (3:15)
  3. 3 Over the Wall (5:59)
  4. 4 It Was a Pleasure (3:14)
  5. 5 A Promise (4:07)
  6. 6 Heaven Up Here (3:44)
  7. 7 The Disease (2:28)
  8. 8 All My Colours (4:06)
  9. 9 No Dark Things (4:27)
  10. 10 Turquoise Days (3:51)
  11. 11 All I Want (4:16)
  12. 12 Broke My Neck (7:17)
  13. 13 Show of Strength (4:39)
  14. 14 The Disease (1:53)
  15. 15 All I Want (3:09)
  16. 16 Zimbo (3:52)
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Album Credits

Performance Credits
Echo & the Bunnymen Primary Artist
Ian McCulloch Rhythm Guitar, Vocals
Les Pattinson Bass
Leslie Penny Woodwind
Will Sergeant Guitar
Pete de Freitas Drums
Technical Credits
Echo & the Bunnymen Producer
Dan Hersch Remastering
Bill Inglot Reissue Producer, Remastering
Hugh Jones Producer, Engineer, Original Album Producer
Ian McCulloch Composer
Les Pattinson Composer
Will Sergeant Composer
Pete de Freitas Composer
Rachel Gutek Art Direction
Andy Zax Reissue Producer
Martyn Atkins Cover Design
Max Bell Liner Notes
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Heaven on Earth

    Heaven up Here could be the best Bunnymen album of them all: Ocean Rain comes close to surpassing it, but there's something about HUH that is just absolutely out there, so mindblowing, so incredible. Toning down on the tunes and emphasising the rhythm, the funk, the FEEL, this is an album that might not work as immediately as an album like Porcupine, Crocodiles or Ocean Rain, but something initially underneath the music eventually starts to come to the surface following repeated listening. Ian McCulloch and Will Sergeant have made it clear that this was the most fun Bunnymen album to make, as well as their greatest achievement, and I'm tempted to agree. Porcupine has moments of absolute brilliance, but it doesn't soar my spirits like this album does. Ocean Rain is beautiful, really, really beautiful, but it doesn't rock and funk out as marvellously as this album. Here, the Bunnymen create the Bunnysound, a world of huge scope, a world that is romantic, epic, dark, funny, cool, swaggering, haunting, searing, soaring, flying, crying and really, REALLY exciting. 'Show of Strength' is just so gripping, and the perfect album opener. 'With a Hip' is something else altogether, a very catchy, very funky and incredible three minutes. 'Over the Wall' is dramatic, chilling, cathartic and a real experience to listen to. 'A Promise' could be the band's best single along with 'The Killing Moon': it just breathes with life and beauty. 'Heaven up Here' is very crazy and very spontaneous sounding, 'It Was a Pleasure' is a tight, cool bit of funk, 'All My Colours' is dark and beautiful, but the album really takes off for the last three tracks. Following the gloom of 'All My Colours', the fantastic 'No Dark Things' bursts into life and provides awesome relief, with an escalating ending that's really lovely. 'Turquoise Days' bubbles with tension, and paves the way for the incredible 'All I Want', which teeters and teeters on the edge of release before a brilliant chorus that just surrounds this viewer with pure, thrilling sound. The Bunnymen have never been this on-the-ball, never this much in tune with each other, never this wild, this much in thrilling awareness of their own magical brilliance, which adds to the air of pure sensation that's evident on every second of this absolute masterpiece, which is one of the key albums of the eighties, and for many, the reason why Echo and the Bunnymen are the one of the greatest bands of all time. Just listen to the inimitable, wonderful and gripping vocals, the simultaneously angular, uplifting, chiming, frenetic and electrified guitars, the striking, stalking, melodic bass lines or the awesome, close-to-the-edge drumming. I love the Bunnymen. I love this album. Listen to it now!

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