Hector Protector and As I Went over the Water: Two Nursery Rhymes

Hector Protector and As I Went over the Water: Two Nursery Rhymes

by Maurice Sendak
     
 

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Maurice Sendak has interpreted these old' Mother Goose rhymes in animated sequences that have the aliveness and immediacy of a child's own imaginings.

There is little in these verses to suggest the settings, the characterizations, the unforeseen twists and turns of Mr. Sendak's fantastical picture-stories. They extend the boundaries of the short rhymes and add

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Overview

Maurice Sendak has interpreted these old' Mother Goose rhymes in animated sequences that have the aliveness and immediacy of a child's own imaginings.

There is little in these verses to suggest the settings, the characterizations, the unforeseen twists and turns of Mr. Sendak's fantastical picture-stories. They extend the boundaries of the short rhymes and add surprising dimension.

The many admirers of Where the Wild Things Are and The Nutshell Library will recognize in Hector Protector and the seafarer of As I Went Over the Water the same pugnaciousness, love of mischief, and derring-do that characterize Max and Pierre. And they will agree that Mr. Sendak has created a true picture book of astounding originality.

Editorial Reviews

New York Review of Books
Since Caldecott and Lesley Brooke, nobody has illustrated nursery rhymes this well. . . These wonderfully funny, charming drawings are just as good as those Mr. Sendak did for Where the Wild Things Are.
Publishers Weekly
Now in its second season, HarperCollins's reissue of 22 Sendak classics continues. This time, his collaborations with Ruth Krauss take center stage. In Charlotte and the White Horse, first published in 1955, creamy pages frame Sendak's softly lit illustrations of a girl who convinces her father to keep a wobbly legged horse and cares for him until he can stand on his own. Sendak's delicate watercolors suit the dream-like mood of a boy who accomplishes all that he sets out to do in his imaginary world, in I Want to Paint My Bathroom Blue (1956), also by Krauss. A boy's imagination also comes to the fore in A Very Special House (1953) by Krauss, as the artist depicts the hero creating a home filled with a turtle, a giant, a very old lion and "some monkeys and some skunkeys." Oversize pages brim with the creatures as well as his house's "very special" furnishings. Open House for Butterflies (1960) takes a similar format to these collaborators' classic A Hole Is to Dig, and lastly, Hector Protector and As I Went Over the Water: Two Nursery Rhymes (1965) by Sendak conveys as much plot through the artist's wordless spreads as with the minimal text. For collectors and budding readers alike. Nov. Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature
Fans of Sendak's Where the Wild Things Are will not be disappointed with the illustrations accompanying these two traditional nursery rhymes. The rhymes themselves are very short and hold very little action. However, the illustrations for each contain loads of energy, imagination and fun. The main characters in both rhymes are little boys, and much like the boy in Where the Wild Things Are, they face danger, defy potential evil and master courage beyond their years. The reader cannot help but create personal dialogue and alternative story lines to those that are provided. Indeed, this is the magic behind Sendak's illustrations. This book is made for the spirited child who wishes adventure and beckons danger. 2002 (orig. 1965), HarperCollins, $14.95. Ages 2 to 7. Reviewer: Andrea Sears Andrews

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780060286422
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
11/28/2001
Series:
Sendak Reissues Series
Pages:
64
Product dimensions:
8.37(w) x 7.12(h) x 0.48(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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