Hee-Haw-Dini and the Great Zambini

Hee-Haw-Dini and the Great Zambini

by Roy D. Kennedy, Kim Kennedy
     
 

Who says animals can’t be magicians? Hee-Haw the donkey and Chester the field mouse live on a farm but dream of becoming master magicians. None of the other animals believe they can do it, but when the Great Zambini’s magic chest falls off his train, they just might have a shot.
 
With the help of the master’s most difficult illusions,

Overview

Who says animals can’t be magicians? Hee-Haw the donkey and Chester the field mouse live on a farm but dream of becoming master magicians. None of the other animals believe they can do it, but when the Great Zambini’s magic chest falls off his train, they just might have a shot.
 
With the help of the master’s most difficult illusions, Hee-Haw and Chester disguise themselves as performers and wow their friends. With practice and hard work, they learn that “In order to become a magician, one must believe that magical things can happen.” A delightful tale of fearless ambition, this story proves that appearances can be deceiving—especially when magic is involved.
 

“Magic is a perennially hot topic for children…the subtle themes of the power of advertising and the gullibility of the public make this one worth sharing. The vibrant acrylics with cheerful, cartoon-like characters provide added appeal.”—Booklist
 
“Full of tricks…Kennedy’s acrylics really pop—the mustachio’d Hee-Haw-Dini is a treat to behold.”—Kirkus Reviews

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Nicole Peterson Davis
Everyone knows that animals can't do magic. Except, of course the animals themselves. Hee Haw (a donkey) and Chester (a field mouse) loved to practice magic tricks. The other animals didn't believe that they could do magic. But, they practiced and practiced anyway. One day they found the magic trunk of the Great Zambini. The trunk had fallen from the circus train. So, they decided to put on a magic show for their friends. However, since their friends didn't think they could do magic, they had to wear disguises. They pulled off a magnificent show, and were surprised when the Great Zambini was there to see the performance. The moral of the story is to do what you are good at, even if other people don't believe in you. The illustrations in this book are magnificent. Each animal has his or her own personality, and shows a variety of emotions throughout the book. This darling picture book is certain to please young readers. Reviewer: Nicole Peterson Davis
School Library Journal

K-Gr 2

Animals with huge aspirations, Hee-Haw the donkey and field mouse Chester create their own futures with single-minded determination, a belief that miracles can happen, lots of practice, and amazing luck. Finding the trunk of The Great Zambini after it falls from a passing circus train, the friends find a way to fulfill their wildest dreams of becoming world-famous magicians and put on a show to fool their naysayers. "Believe and it will happen" seems to be the mantra of Chester and Hee-Haw, and their perseverance is rewarded by The Great Zambini himself. Bold and bright hues frame farm and circus scenes peopled with cartoon figures. The story and illustrations are simple and colorful, yet some of the more advanced vocabulary ("feat," "shimmering," "illusions") may necessitate explanations during a read-aloud.-Mary Elam, Forman Elementary School, Plano, TX

Kirkus Reviews
A farm odd couple becomes a magical team. Chester the mouse and his best friend Hee-Haw the donkey love to sit under the apple tree on their farm and practice magic tricks. They dream of joining The Great Zambini, traveling the world and doing amazing things. Pig, Rabbit and all the other animals on the farm make fun of them, but no one can daunt their spirit. One day, a circus train passes by the farm, the last car clearly Zambini's-out of which tumbles his trunk full of tricks! Now they can have their own magic show. Their show goes beautifully, impressing the other animals, who are completely suckered in by Chester and Hee-Haw's magician alter egos. Zambini himself appears and then, with his two new assistants, promptly disappears. All told, it's a bright but underdeveloped adventure, with just not enough substance in the tale to make the big reveal much of an event. Doug Kennedy's acrylics really pop-the mustachio'd Hee-Haw-Dini is a treat to behold-but his illustrations seem aimed at a younger audience than sister Kim's ample text. (Picture book. 4-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780810970250
Publisher:
Abrams, Harry N., Inc.
Publication date:
04/01/2009
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.70(w) x 10.60(h) x 1.60(d)
Age Range:
5 - 7 Years

Meet the Author

Kim Kennedy and her brother Doug Kennedy have collaborated on several book projects. Publishers Weekly said the Kennedys “create fantasy situations that evoke 19th-century fairy stories . . . [and the] paintings have the spirit of early animation with a touch of Oz.” They live in Monroe, Louisiana.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >