Hegel, Nietzsche, and Philosophy: Thinking Freedom by Will Dudley | 9780521038867 | Paperback | Barnes & Noble
Hegel, Nietzsche, and Philosophy: Thinking Freedom

Hegel, Nietzsche, and Philosophy: Thinking Freedom

by Will Dudley
     
 

ISBN-10: 0521038863

ISBN-13: 9780521038867

Pub. Date: 07/30/2007

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

Both philosophers adopted Kant's notion that freedom depends on a further kind of freedom for which it is unable to account, and that people's actions are truly free only if their choices are determined by a free will, Dudley (philosophy, Williams College) argues, but they then diverged to contend that willing can be truly free only in virtue of an activity other than

Overview

Both philosophers adopted Kant's notion that freedom depends on a further kind of freedom for which it is unable to account, and that people's actions are truly free only if their choices are determined by a free will, Dudley (philosophy, Williams College) argues, but they then diverged to contend that willing can be truly free only in virtue of an activity other than itself, and that self-determination of the will rests on another kind of freedom without which willing fails to be genuinely self-determining. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780521038867
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Publication date:
07/30/2007
Series:
Modern European Philosophy Series
Pages:
348
Product dimensions:
5.98(w) x 8.98(h) x 0.79(d)

Table of Contents

Acknowledgmentsxiii
List of Texts, Translations, and Abbreviationsxv
Introduction: Freedom and Philosophy1
1.The Significance of Freedom: From Politics to Philosophy1
2.Competing Conceptions of Freedom3
Liberal Freedom3
Kantian Freedom4
3.Hegel and Nietzsche7
4.Goals and Structure of the Book8
Part I.tFreedom in and Through Hegel's Philosophy
1The Place of Freedom in Hegel's Philosophy15
1.The Parts of Hegel's System: Logic, Nature, Spirit15
2.The Logical Concept of Freedom17
3.The Philosophy of Spirit as an Account of Freedom21
4.Structure and Method of Part 124
2The Freedom of Willing: Hegel's Philosophy of Right28
1.The Logical Concept of Judgment29
2.The Initial Conception of the Will and Its Development31
3.The Moral Conception of the Will39
4.The Incomplete Freedom of the Moral Will42
5.The Institutions of Ethical Freedom: Family, Civil Society, State56
3Freedom beyond Willing: From the Philosophy of Right to Absolute Spirit69
1.The Place of Willing in the Philosophy of Spirit70
2.The Logical Concept of Purposiveness75
3.The Incomplete Freedom of Willing79
4.From Willing to Art, Religion, and Philosophy91
4Freedom through Hegel's Philosophy101
1.Art, Religion, and Philosophy: Overcoming the Subjectivity of Willing101
2.Philosophy as Conceptual Systematization102
3.Freedom through Systematic Philosophy106
4.Epilogue: Reconciliation, Resignation, Theory and Practice109
Part II.Freedom in and Through Nietzsche's Philosophy
5The Place of Freedom in Nietzsche's Philosophy123
1.Nietzsche's Lack of System123
2.Nietzsche's Unsystematic Account of Freedom125
6The Freedom of Willing: Decadence and Nobility128
1.The Decadent Failures to Will Freely: Two Types of Sickness128
Disgregation: The Unfreedom of Not Willing128
The Morality of Selflessness: The Incomplete Freedom of Willing Nothing134
The Contagious Circle of Decadence143
2.From Decadence to Nobility: Convalescence146
Destruction of the Moral Will146
The Dangers of Destruction156
Noble Health: The Establishment of a Free Will160
7Freedom beyond Willing: From Nobility to Tragedy175
1.The Incomplete Freedom of Nobility175
Destruction of the Noble Will: Healthy Reinfection178
The Dangers of Destruction Redux187
Beyond Nobility and Decadence: The Endless Cycle of Sickness and Convalescence189
2.Tragic Great Health195
Affirmation out of Overfullness197
Amor Fati and Eternal Return201
The Glad Tidings of Worldly Self-Redemption207
8Freedom through Nietzsche's Philosophy213
1.The Language of Tragedy as a Condition of Freedom214
2.Philosophy as a Source of Tragic Language219
Conclusion: Philosophy and Freedom227
1.The Freedom of Willing and Its Limitations227
2.Freedom through Philosophy: System and Genealogy230
3.The Complementarity of System and Genealogy235
4.The Significance of Freedom: From Philosophy back to Politics239
Notes243
Index319

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