Heir To The Everlasting

( 5 )

Overview

The Pulitzer-nominated author of EARL IN THE YELLOW SHIRT turns her acclaimed talents to an epic story of three generations of Southern women at Big Eddy, the home place they love. HEIR TO THE EVERLASTING begins at the turn of the last century with the beautiful, determined Pinkie Alexander, strong-willed matron of the Alexander clan. Come Hell or the high water of the south Georgia river which gave Big Eddy its name, Pinkie will ensure the survival of her family on their beloved land--a place where the family ...
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Overview

The Pulitzer-nominated author of EARL IN THE YELLOW SHIRT turns her acclaimed talents to an epic story of three generations of Southern women at Big Eddy, the home place they love. HEIR TO THE EVERLASTING begins at the turn of the last century with the beautiful, determined Pinkie Alexander, strong-willed matron of the Alexander clan. Come Hell or the high water of the south Georgia river which gave Big Eddy its name, Pinkie will ensure the survival of her family on their beloved land--a place where the family cemetery guards the spirit of the past, and where secrets, as well as the dearly departed, are buried.

Follow the lives, loves, mysteries, deadly feuds and steely courage of the Alexander women through a full century of joys and sorrows. HEIR TO THE EVERLASTING showcases the culture, language and daily travails of their time and place with vivid storytelling skills and Janice Daugharty's love for "the working words."

"Janice Daugharty is a born storyteller." ~Joyce Carol Oates

"Janice Daugharty is a natural-born writer, one of those Georgia women like O'Connor, McCullers, or Siddons who are best grown in small towns, a long way from city lights. There is a lot of red clay and long nights in every line she puts on paper." ~Pat Conroy

Janice Daugharty's 1997 novel, EARL IN THE YELLOW SHIRT, (HarperCollins) was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize. She is the author of seven acclaimed novels and two short story collections. She serves as writer-in-residence at Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College, in Tifton, Georgia.

Visit the author at www.janicedaugharty.com

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781935661924
  • Publisher: BelleBooks
  • Publication date: 2/4/2011
  • Pages: 364
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.81 (d)

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 5 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 29, 2011

    Loved this book!

    From the very beginning, the reader is drawn into the world of the Alexander family. We watch as May grows from a young girl being raised by her grandmother into an adult. May, aka Little Pinkie, goes with her grandmother helping those who are sick or down and out. May tries to be like her grandmother and do the right thing, but sometimes those two don't quite match up in May's eyes.

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  • Posted April 10, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    a poignant tale of stonrg women

    Family means something different to every person. The strings that bind us to others vary in strength, length, and color, but they pull us to some extent, nonetheless. In pullitzer nominated author Janice Daughtery's Heir To the Everlasting, we see the ties between the strong women of the Alexander family throughout their century long reign. Through marriages, deaths, births, trials, and triumphs, the women at Big Eddy continue on with a love and strength that not only allows them to continue on through life but to also stand for what they believe despite what society or the men in the family say. While the second half of the book meandered and dragged a bit, the beautifully rich characters and story in the first half carried teh book through to the end.

    Disclaimer: A copy of the book was provided by the publisher

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  • Posted April 3, 2011

    Great read

    4.5 / 5

    (Received review copy from publisher.)

    I enjoyed reading Heir to the Everlasting and the glimpse it provided into the lives of the Alexander family. For this reader, the touchstone of the story is Big Eddy, the family plantation, and May Alexander Wetherington is the keystone.

    Big Eddy is the touchstone because that is the family "seat" and makes the rest of the story possible. It is the kind of place that embodies the phrase "if only these walls could talk," although, in this case, it's if only the walls and the land could talk. Through the lives of Pinkie (May's grandmother), May and Sara Ann (May's granddaughter), how they carry on and make their lives better - and sometimes worse - and keep their heads up in spite of troubles and tribulations is a story that I believe many readers can relate to.

    May Alexander Wetherington is the keystone of the story. While Heir to the Everlasting is as much Pinkie's and Sara Ann's story as it is May's, the book is a tale of her growing up on Big Eddy, growing older, marrying, having children, but always coming back to the family home, and seeing what she can do for her own granddaughter as Pinkie did for her.

    The heart of the story is love. Love of family, love of the land, and simply love of life - even if it may be a bygone thing. It is also a story of relationships - how they
    define us, how we define them, the blind spots they may cause us and how they make us stronger.

    A wonderful book that I would recommend to anyone who likes a good story that doesn't necessarily deliver a happy ending, but a fitting one for the tale it tells.

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  • Posted April 3, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    This book is well worth reading

    In South Georgia, the Big Eddy Plantation has thrived since Widow Pinkie Baxter Alexander began to manage her family estate circa 1900. She raises her four sons and a granddaughter May whose mother Minnie died in 2007 of malaria. Pinkie believes that May is the only one of her descendants with a backbone like hers. Buried on the planation is gold at least that is the rumor, but only Pinkie knows where and she takes it to the grave with her.

    After Pinkie's death, May takes over running the Big Eddy. She is as determined as her late mentor grandma to keep the plantation afloat though the rivers and death of loved ones try to destroy her heritage. Like the late Pinkie did with her, May teaches her granddaughter Sara Ann the importance of keeping the Big Eddy alive and in the family. At the family cemetery on the planation, the gravestone of May's granddad needs replacing. As if Pinkie knew what her descendants needed, the two females find the secret that May's grandma took to the grave.

    This is an entertaining century long epic that looks deep into the Alexander clan though predominantly three women. The story line brings to life South Georgia over the course of the twentieth century. The lead females are fully developed while the rest of the brood and the townsfolk enhance understanding the love the trio has for the land. Though there is some action and the mystery of the gold, Heir to Everlasting is a regional character study that showcases the lives of Southern women during a tumultuous century. This book is well worth reading

    Harriet Klausner

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 31, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

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