Helen Keller

Helen Keller

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by Sullivan
     
 

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Helen Keller was the first deaf and blind student to ever attend an American college, but graduating from Radcliffe with honors was only one of her many accomplishments. Her writing and speeches tell the poignant story of a woman who struggles to overcome personal adversity, while working as an advocate for the physically challenged.

Overview

Helen Keller was the first deaf and blind student to ever attend an American college, but graduating from Radcliffe with honors was only one of her many accomplishments. Her writing and speeches tell the poignant story of a woman who struggles to overcome personal adversity, while working as an advocate for the physically challenged.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
One of the most celebrated lives in American history is brought to life in this biography of Helen Keller. Helen's fiery spirit along with help from her loyal teacher, Annie Sullivan, led to her success in living with being blind and deaf. Readers will be awed to learn of Keller's fierce determinism to succeed in a world that was often unfriendly and unsupportive of those with disabilities. The book displays her courage to succeed and to help other deaf and blind people live as normally as possible. Each chapter progressively documents Keller's life story along with photographs that accent the text and bring her life closer to the reader. The author uses direct quotes from several of Keller's books, which makes the text livelier and provides authentic, primary source information. A chronology of her life, further reading list, index and a list of resources top off this recommended biography. 2000, Scholastic, $12.95 and $4.50. Ages 8 to 12. Reviewer: Melissa A. Caudill
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
Gr 4-6-These biographies don't quite live up to their billing. At the beginning of each volume, the author discusses the differences between primary and secondary sources and the importance of using primary sources whenever possible. These introductions and the series title imply that the books rely heavily on the actual written and spoken words of the subject. Instead, what readers will find are perhaps a few more quotes than are common in biographies for young people, but the approach is not shatteringly different. The question, however, is whether this matters. These may not be unique biographies, but they are still well written, fast moving, and highly readable, squeezed into a small format that should appeal to many students. Both books feature black-and-white photos and reproductions, a useful index, a short bibliography of primary and secondary sources, and a short list of further readings, along with places to contact for further information. Certainly much has been written about these two figures and many libraries will find their shelves already well stocked. Those needing more materials, however, will find these to be solid choices.-Todd Morning, Schaumburg Township Public Library, IL Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
The compelling lives of Helen Keller and Anne Sullivan are interwoven with quotations from their own writing in a choppy, flat, rehashing of the now-familiar story of Keller's vast potential and the brilliant teaching skills that grew to make Helen's social and intellectual life rich, but negated any semblance of a personal life for Anne. Though touched upon, several questions about relationships remain unanswered and basic motivations are glossed over, namely decisions regarding marital and family relationships. Brief insights into the nature of some of Keller's major obstacles are succinctly summarized and enlarged by well-chosen selections from Helen's biographies, yet still lack the depth and insight a fuller telling allows. In addition, well-selected and appropriately placed black-and-white photographs enhance the telling, but are standard fare chosen from various photo archives. What is perhaps most annoying is the writing style itself: paragraphs of two to three short, declarative sentences and an avoidance of contractions and complex sentence structure create the sense of a basal reader. Included in the "In Their Own Words" series, Sullivan's clear introduction to Helen's story teaches the difference between primary and secondary sources, but does not internally demonstrate the proper use of documentation. His primary and secondary resources are broken down in the bibliography and include further reading suggestions, as well as a listing of organizations that could provide supplemental report information. Satisfying the requirement for 100-page biography reports, this adds little else to the field. (Nonfiction. 8-10)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780439095556
Publisher:
Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date:
01/28/2002
Series:
In Their Own Words Series
Pages:
128
Product dimensions:
5.27(w) x 7.57(h) x 0.29(d)
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

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Helen Keller 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
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