Hell Hole

Hell Hole

5.0 1
by Ken Farmer
     
 

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Bass Reeves is back! If you're a fan of L'Amour, Kelton, Burroughs and Grey, you'll love HELL HOLE - the third novel in the best selling and award winning Bass Reeves saga in The Nations.
US Deputy Marshals, under Judge Issac Parker, The Hanging Judge, patrol the Indian Nations-the most dangerous place in the world in the late 19th century.
Bass Reeves and his…  See more details below

Overview

Bass Reeves is back! If you're a fan of L'Amour, Kelton, Burroughs and Grey, you'll love HELL HOLE - the third novel in the best selling and award winning Bass Reeves saga in The Nations.
US Deputy Marshals, under Judge Issac Parker, The Hanging Judge, patrol the Indian Nations-the most dangerous place in the world in the late 19th century.
Bass Reeves and his partner, Jack McGann, are tasked to bring in the Griffin gang and clean out the cesspool of outlaws at a town known as Catoosa, the Hell Hole. Judge Parker wants "that bunch of societal paragons of miscreants and malefactors that are gathered there eliminated" and doesn't care how Bass and his men do it.
"Some call me one thing and some call me another...But mostly they call me Bass Reeves and this just ain't yer day, son."
They team up with Jack's godson, Texas Ranger Bodie Hickman and track the Griffin gang across half of Oklahoma Territory-recovering two kidnapped young ladies-and then back into the Hell Hole with their orders of "Bring them in alive...or bring them in dead."

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780991239047
Publisher:
Timber Creek Press
Publication date:
03/30/2014
Pages:
374
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.83(d)

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Hell Hole 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Kiyoshi1 More than 1 year ago
The smell of horse sweat in the afternoon sun, the sound of creaking saddle leather, and dust in places you forgot you had. I didn't consider myself a fan of the Western genre until I read The Nations, by the writing team of Ken Farmer and Buck Stienke, co-authors of the Black Eagle Force series. I am a fan of military action fiction and really enjoyed their style. So, I decided to try The Nations, and boy, was I hooked on the story of Bass Reeves, first black U.S. Marshal west of the Mississippi and some say, the inspiration for the fictional character The Lone Ranger. Spell-bound, I rode along with him and his fellow lawmen through Oklahoma, Indian Territory as they chased after some of the meanest outlaws that ever forked a saddle. With a certain amount of apprehension, I picked up Haunted Falls, the second book in the series. After all, some sequels fall a little flat, and I was prepared for the worst. Not this time. I fell into the book and couldn't put it down. More information about the state I live in during the tumultuous period before the Land Run of '89 danced before me and painted a picture as vivid as any Remington painting in the National Western Heritage Museum. You can imagine how I eagerly anticipated the release of Hell Hole, the third book. Ken Farmer took this one on by himself, and I wondered if he could keep up the pace. Not to worry. He introduces new characters who add to the width and depth of the story, and made the previous characters fuller and well-rounded. (Even though the trail food they ate probably wasn't all that tasty.) Don't start to think, however, that the books are all shoot-'em-up tales of double-lashing, two-fisted, pistol blazing steeley-eyed men. Sure, there's plenty of that action, but there's also a gentler side. The West wasn't settled by just cowboys. It was the families that truly made it worthwhile and gave it meaning, and Farmer brings that out with the tenderness and understanding that comes from his forty years of acting. The result is characters who have emotions, and dialogue that is crisp and lively. From the doe-eyed beauty Annabel Holcolm, to the sometimes naive Bodie Hickman, the characters are engaging, and the reader instantly empathizes with them. The bad guys are unrepentant and vicious, much like it must have been in the untamed territory that Judge Issac Parker oversaw from his Federal Courthouse in Fort Smith, Arkansas. He wouldn't have earned the moniker "The Hanging Judge" without men like Bass Reeves to risk life and limb in the I.T. to bring in the outlaws that threatened the