×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Hell to Pay: Operation DOWNFALL and the Invasion of Japan, 1945-1947
     

Hell to Pay: Operation DOWNFALL and the Invasion of Japan, 1945-1947

4.1 7
by D. M. Giangreco
 

See All Formats & Editions

Hell To Pay: Operation Downfall and the Invasion of Japan, 1945-1947 is the most comprehensive examination of the myriad complex issues that comprised the strategic plans for the American invasion of Japan. U.S. planning for the invasion and military occupation of Imperial Japan was begun in 1943, two years before the dropping of atom bombs on Hiroshima

Overview

Hell To Pay: Operation Downfall and the Invasion of Japan, 1945-1947 is the most comprehensive examination of the myriad complex issues that comprised the strategic plans for the American invasion of Japan. U.S. planning for the invasion and military occupation of Imperial Japan was begun in 1943, two years before the dropping of atom bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. In final form, Operation Downfall called for a massive Allied invasion—on a scale dwarfing “D-Day”— to be carried out in two stages. In the first stage, Operation Olympic, after the dropping of multiple atom bombs the U.S. Sixth Army would lead the southern-most assault on the Home Island of Kyushu to secure airfields and anchorages to support the second stage, Operation Coronet, a decisive invasion of the industrial heartland of Japan through the Tokyo Plain, 500 miles to the north, led by the First and Eighth armies. These facts are well known and have been recounted— with varying degrees of accuracy— in a variety of books and articles. A common theme in these works is their reliance on a relatively few declassified high-level planning documents. An attempt to fully understand how both the U.S. and Japan planned to conduct the massive battles subsequent to the initial landings was not dealt with in these books beyond the skeletal U.S. outlines formulated nine months before the initial land battles were to commence, and more than a year before the anticipated climactic series of battles near Tokyo. On the Japanese side, plans for Operation Ketsu-go, the “decisive battle” in the Home Islands, have been unexamined below the strategic level and seldom consisted of more than a rehash of U.S. intelligence estimates of Kamikaze aircraft available for the defense of Kyushu. Hell To Pay examines the invasion of Japan in light of substantial new sources, unearthed in both familiar and obscure archives, and brings the political and military ramifications of the enormous casualties and loss of material projected by trying to bring the Pacific War to a conclusion by a military invasion of the island. This ground breaking history counters the revisionist interpretations questioning the rationale for the use of the atom bomb and shows that the U.S. decision was based on very real estimates of the truly horrific cost of a conventional invasion of Japan.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Giangreco, a longtime former editor for Military Review, synthesizes years of research in a definitive analysis of America's motives for using atomic bombs against Japan in 1945. The nuclear bombing of Japan, he concludes, was undertaken in the context of Operation Downfall: a series of invasions of the Japanese islands American planners estimated would initially cause anywhere from a quarter-million to a million U.S. casualties, plus millions of Japanese. Giangreco presents the contexts of America's growing war weariness and declining manpower resources. Above all, he demonstrates the Japanese militarists' continuing belief that they could defeat the U.S. Japan had almost 13,000 planes available for suicide attacks, and plans for the defense of Kyushu, the U.S.'s initial invasion site, were elaborate and sophisticated, deploying over 900,000 men. Japanese and American documents presented here offer a “chillingly clear-eyed” picture of a battle of attrition so daunting that Army Chief of Staff George C. Marshall considered using atomic and chemical weapons to support the operation. Faced with this conundrum, in Giangreco's excellent examination, President Truman took what seemed the least worst option. 44 b&w photos, 12 maps. (Oct. 15)
Library Journal
A former editor at Military Review provides us with one of the first books to detail the planned U.S. invasion of the Japanese home islands in October 1945 and the Japanese preparations for that invasion. Drawing on solid research in both countries, Giangreco lays out the U.S. planning and the whole scenario of what would have happened: millions of casualties, prolongation of the Pacific war, possibly past 1947, and manpower shortages and war weariness in the United States, with Japanese militarists—and their no-surrender policy—in control in Japan. The two-pronged invasion would have begun on the island of Kyushu, preceded by no fewer than nine atom-bomb drops behind the landing beaches. Illustrative of just how much the war with Japan was a close-run thing, this is essential reading.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781591143161
Publisher:
Naval Institute Press
Publication date:
10/28/2009
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
384
Sales rank:
353,050
Product dimensions:
7.30(w) x 10.10(h) x 1.10(d)

What People are Saying About This

Wilson D. Miscamble
"Hell to Pay is a truly impressive work of military history. D.M. Giangreco brilliantly examines not only the military planning of the United States for the anticipated invasions of Operation Downfall but also the unrelenting defensive preparations of Japan in its Ketsu Go campaign. This important book is filled with crucial insights and fascinating details about the strategy and tactics of each side as they moved towards a bloody and costly culmination of their fierce conflict. It constitutes essential reading for all those who truly want to comprehend Japan's defeat and the end of the Pacific War."--(Wilson D. Miscamble, Professor of History, University of Notre Dame, author of From Roosevelt to Truman: Potsdam, Hiroshima and the Cold War)
Stanley L. Falk
"Hell to Pay is a comprehensive, revealing, extensively researched description of American plans and preparations for the invasion of Japan, with important new information and analyses. Especially valuable are its detailed explanations of force requirements, manpower and redeployment problems, and Japanese defensive measures."--(Stanley L. Falk, Former Chief Historian, U.S. Air Force)
Robert James Maddox
"A magnificent achievement. Giangreco provides a comprehensive analysis of preparations by both sides for the anticipated invasion of Japan. Based on an enormous amount of research, Hell to Pay examines everything from decisions made at the highest levels to more mundane considerations such as terrain and weaponry. Giangreco also demolishes two of the revisionists' most precious myths: that Japan was trying to surrender during the summer of 1945 and that casualty estimates later cited by American officials were wildly exaggerated in order to cover up the real reason for using atomic bombs. This book is indispensable for anyone interested in the subject."--(Robert James Maddox, author of Weapons for Victory: The Hiroshima Decision)
Edward S. Miller
"Truman unleashed the atomic bomb to avoid the appalling casualties of invading Japan. Revisionists condemn the morality of the war-ending 'miracle of deliverance' by belittling the butcher's bill. Tapping little-known American and Japanese records of 1945 D.M. Giangreco lays bare the gruesome bloodbath had Operation Downfall been launched. Case closed."--(Edward S. Miller, author of War Plan Orange: The U.S. Strategy to Defeat Japan, 1897-1945)

Meet the Author

D. M. Giangreco has been an editor for the U.S. Army’s professional journal, Military Review, for over twenty years. He has lectured widely on national security matters and is an award-winning author of numerous articles on military and political subjects and six books, including Dear Harry. He is a resident of Fort Leavenworth, KS.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Hell to Pay: Operation DOWNFALL and the Invasion of Japan, 1945-1947 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anyone who doubts that we should have used the atomic weapons against Japan needs to read this book.
ProfessorBoh More than 1 year ago
An interesting read on a topic that has received scant attention. For a scholar of the Pacific Theatre it is a valuable addition to their library. It should be read with Edward S. Miller's "War Plan Orange" for a before and after view of the plans to defeat Japan and how those plans actually played out.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Thorough and well-documented, if a bit repetitive in some chapters. Provides significant new documentation as to both the context and actual choices facing President Truman in his choice to use nucler weapons. This is a significant contribution for those wishing to understand the issues involved, and not rely on revisionist accounts drawn selectively from the historical record.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago