Hellboy: The Midnight Circus

Hellboy: The Midnight Circus

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by Mike Mignola, Duncan Fegredo
     
 

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Young Hellboy runs away from the B.P.R.D. only to stumble upon a weird and fantastical circus and the few demons from Hell who inhabit it. * Cover and story by Mike Mignola! * Duncan Fegredo returns! * An original graphic novel in hardcover! "In the world of Hellboy; the stony hand that Hellboy uses to clobber opponents is called the Right Hand of Doom.

Overview

Young Hellboy runs away from the B.P.R.D. only to stumble upon a weird and fantastical circus and the few demons from Hell who inhabit it. * Cover and story by Mike Mignola! * Duncan Fegredo returns! * An original graphic novel in hardcover! "In the world of Hellboy; the stony hand that Hellboy uses to clobber opponents is called the Right Hand of Doom. For cartoonist and creator Mike Mignola; his right-hand man for doing Hellboy these days could be considered Duncan Fegredo." -Newsarama

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781621158455
Publisher:
Dark Horse Comics
Publication date:
11/05/2013
Sold by:
Penguin Random House Publisher Services
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
24 MB
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This product may take a few minutes to download.

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Hellboy: The Midnight Circus 2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Jartistt More than 1 year ago
…not very impressed with “Hellboy: The Midnight Circus.” It is composed without any of the magic, mystery and fun that fans have come to expect from Mike Mignola’s story-telling. Mignola’s distinctive drawing style is missed here too. There have been other artists to do much more than adequate justice to Hellboy. Rich Corben’s illustration of “The Crooked Man” and other past Hellboy pieces he’s done are stand outs and are especially note-worthy. Artist’s Shawn Alexander and Scott Hampton too have a flare for the gothic and were great contributors to the legend. Sadly; Duncan Ferrero’s art looks good at a glance but is hardly compelling under scrutiny. This combined with Mignola’s lack-luster proses leads to a disappointing outing for the reader. In fairness “Midnight Circus” could stand as a fairly good introduction for new readers but as a whole will fall short for the committed fan.