Hellhole

( 52 )

Overview

Only the most desperate colonists dare to make a new home on Hellhole.  Reeling from a recent asteroid impact, tortured with horrific storms, tornadoes, hurricanes, earthquakes, and churning volcanic eruptions, the planet is a dumping ground for undesirables, misfits, and charlatans…but also a haven for dreamers and independent pioneers. 

 

Against all odds, an exiled general named Adolphus has turned Hellhole into a place of real opportunity for the desperate ...

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Hellhole

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Overview

Only the most desperate colonists dare to make a new home on Hellhole.  Reeling from a recent asteroid impact, tortured with horrific storms, tornadoes, hurricanes, earthquakes, and churning volcanic eruptions, the planet is a dumping ground for undesirables, misfits, and charlatans…but also a haven for dreamers and independent pioneers. 

 

Against all odds, an exiled general named Adolphus has turned Hellhole into a place of real opportunity for the desperate colonists who dare to make the planet their home.  While the colonists are hard at work developing the planet, General Adolphus secretly builds alliances with the leaders of the other Deep Zone worlds, forming a clandestine alliance against the tyrannical, fossilized government responsible for their exile. 

What no one knows is this: the planet Hellhole, though damaged and volatile, hides an amazing secret.  Deep beneath its surface lies the remnants of an obliterated alien civilization and the buried memories of its unrecorded past that, when unearthed, could tear the galaxy apart. 

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

Hellhole is a planet that deserves its name. Nearly uninhabitable, raked by storms and earthquakes, this remote outpost has become the dumping ground for dissidents, criminals, and other assort misfits. What these exiles don't realize is that far beneath the surface of this god forsaken place are previously unknown historical records that could shake the entire power structure of the galaxy. A new space opera series launch by two respected genre authors.

Publishers Weekly
Bestselling authors Herbert and Anderson (The Winds of Dune) start a space opera series with a tale quite similar to Frank Herbert's Dune in setting, theme, and conflict. On the dangerous frontier planet Hellhole, defeated and exiled rebel Gen. Tiber Adolphus continues his honorable opposition to the political scheming and selfish machinations of the Crown Jewel worlds and grandmotherly Diadem Michella Duchenet. Adolphus and his companions work in secret to undermine the royal space travel monopoly and form a coalition of Deep Zone planets. Diadem Michella, embroiled in the schemes of the ancient noble families on the decadent capital planet Sonjeera, is too distracted to recognize the danger Adolphus poses. Repeated mentions of minor details bloat the novel's length, characters are one-dimensional, and the tale has an unsatisfying cliffhanger conclusion. (Mar.)
From the Publisher

“This new space epic from the best-selling team of Herbert and Anderson is wide and complex…Audie Award winner Scott Brick’s performance keeps the suspense elevated. Fear not, these authors will deliver the rest of the story on schedule. Fans of traditional sf fare will keep this, and future volumes, moving off the shelves.” – Library Journal, starred review

“[Scott Brick] manages to capture the fiery determination of exiled General Adolphus and the cold calculating cruelty of Diadem Michella while still allowing the listener’s imagination to fill in the gaps. The book’s many other viewpoint characters also find unique expression in Brick’s capable hands…Hellhole manages to stand out as a science fiction novel that succeeds in all the areas that the genre should. It’s cerebrally engaging, spiritually challenging, and yet emotionally powerful as a story in its own right. I’m very excited to find out what the next two volumes have in store.” – Azurescape

“[Brick] has a very versatile voice which is easy to listen to, bringing life to all the characters in his own special way…The dialogue is fast and furious, likewise the action, and it is a page-turner from start to finish. Space opera at its best…this audiobook is certainly recommended not just for its story but for the good quality reproduction of the narration. It’s new and exciting and it will surely be well received.” – SFCrowsnest.com
Previous Praise for Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson
 
“Herbert and Anderson create vivid characters—both human and machine—with passionate goals.”
RT Book Reviews on Dune: The Battle of Corrin

“Filling in the gaps between the late Frank Herbert’s classic Dune and its sequels Dune Messiah and Children of Dune…this sequel to Paul of Dune is an important addition to the Dune chronology and will be in demand by Herbert fans.”
Library Journal, starred review on The Winds of Dune

Library Journal
Exiled to the prison planet Hellhole (officially Hallholme) for posing a threat to the corrupt Constellation, a stellar monarchy composed of 74 planets and ruled by a tyrant known as The Diadem, former Gen. Tiber Maximillian Adolphus has declared Hellhole's independence and now prepares for war. In the midst of their preparations, the rebels realize that a trio of asteroids is heading on a collision course for the planet—presumably as part of an attack by an unknown enemy. VERDICT In this sequel to Hellhole coauthors Herbert and Anderson, creators of the Dune prequels (Dune: House Atreides; Dune: The Butlerian Jihad) offer another fast-paced, multi-level drama with a tough-as-nails hero involved in an impossible rebellion. The plot draws inspiration from both the Dune and Star Wars® universes but possesses an original sensibility that sets it apart from both popular worlds. Fans of panoramic space opera and dynastic fiction such as David Weber's "Honor Harrington" novels and Lois McMaster Bujold's "Miles Vorkosigan" series should flock to this genre addition.
Library Journal
In the distant future, the Constellation controls a core of 20 worlds—the Crown Jewels—and claims dominion over more than 50 peripheral planets in "the Deep Zone." When General Adolphus challenges the corrupt rule of the dowager Diadem Michella Duchenet, his incorruptible integrity leads to his defeat and exile to the inhospitable world of Hallhome, known popularly as "Hellhole." However, Adolphus sees his situation not as imprisonment on a deadly world but as an opportunity to plant the seeds of a true revolution. The coauthors of "Legends of Dune" (The Butlerian Jihad; The Machine Crusade; The Battle of Corrin) and other series set in the Dune universe introduce a new trilogy that combines the best of space opera with galactic intrigue and a cast of memorable characters. VERDICT Fans of David Weber's "Honor Harrington" series and the Star Wars® novels should enjoy a new entry into this popular category.
Kirkus Reviews

A new far-future trilogy from the latter-day Dune wizards (The Winds of Dune, 2009, etc.), bristling with revolution and alien contact.

The inner worlds of the decadent human empire known as the Constellation are ruled by a self-centered and dim-witted aristocracy headed by Diadem Michella Duchenet. Ten years previously, the neglected, impoverished and exploited worlds of the remote Deep Zone staged a desperate rebellion that ultimately failed because its leader, the honorable Gen. Adolphus, refused to sink to the Constellation's level of depravity. With his supporters, Adolphus was exiled to planet Hellhole, devastated five centuries ago by a giant asteroid impact that wiped out most of its life—including a race of advanced aliens. Hellhole became a dumping ground for the rebels, common criminals and other undesirables. After 10 years of hard work, Hellhole is now quite pleasant despite electrical storms, inedible flora and some dangerous fauna that survived the impact. Elsewhere, interstellar travel proceeds via the superfast stringline network whose every route leads through the central empire. Meanwhile, Adolphus secretly builds an alternative decentralized network among the Deep Zone planets. Then one Hellhole colonist falls into a pool of "slickwater"...and acquires a lodger in his brain: the mind of Zairic, the Xayan head honcho. Others soon jump into the slickwater to garner their own alien partners. Unfortunately, the alien aristocrats are as dim and self-absorbed as their human counterparts. The prose is boiler-plate, and nothing here has any real heft.

Ho-hum—it's on to volume two.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781427211439
  • Publisher: Macmillan Audio
  • Publication date: 3/15/2011
  • Series: Hellhole Trilogy , #1
  • Format: MP3
  • Edition description: Unabridged
  • Ships to U.S.and APO/FPO addresses only.

Meet the Author

Brian Herbert

Brian Herbert, the son of Frank Herbert, is a multiple New York Times bestselling author in his own right. He is the winner of several literary honors and has been nominated for the Nebula award. His critically acclaimed science fiction novels include Sidney's Comet, Sudanna Sudanna, The Race for God, and Man of Two Worlds (written with Frank Herbert). Recently, he completed Dreamer of Dune, a comprehensive biography of his illustrious father.

Kevin J. Anderson has written twenty-nine national bestsellers and has been nominated for the Nebula Award, the Bram Stoker Award, and the SFX Reader's Choice Award. His critically acclaimed original novels include Captain Nemo, Hopscotch, and Hidden Empire. He also set the Guiness world record for "Largest Single-Author Book Signing."
 

Scott Brick has performed on film, television and radio. He appeared on stage throughout the United States in productions of Cyrano, Hamlet, Macbeth and other plays. In addition to his acting work, Scott choreographs fight sequences, and was a combatant in films including Romeo and Juliet, The Fantasticks and Robin Hood: Men in Tights. He has also been hired by Morgan Freeman to write the screenplay adaptation of Arthur C. Clarke’s Rendezvous with Rama.
 
Scott first began narrating audiobooks in 2000, and after recording almost 400 titles in five years, AudioFile magazine named Scott a Golden Voice and “one of the fastest-rising stars in the audiobook galaxy.” He has read a number of titles in Frank Herbert’s bestselling Dune series, and he won the 2003 Science Fiction Audie Award for Dune: The Butlerian Jihad. He has also won over 40 AudioFile Earphones Awards. In 2007, Scott was named Publishers Weekly’s Narrator of the Year.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 52 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(20)

4 Star

(14)

3 Star

(10)

2 Star

(5)

1 Star

(3)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 52 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 5, 2011

    A Good Start

    I received an Advance Reading Copy of this book from one of the authors, Kevin J. Anderson.
    I was looking forward to exploring a new universe created by him and Mr. Herbert.
    For the first part of the book, nothing really stood out for me.
    After a couple of characters discovered the remains of an ancient alien race, the book picked up quite well.
    The pace moved along well. One chapter would end on a cliffhanger of some sort and in most cases, I couldn't wait until the focus came around on that character again.
    Some characters were developed better than others, though. I really didn't find myself too interested in the main character, General Adolphus all that much. Hopefully, he'll be more rounded in the next couple of books.
    Comparisons to Herbert and Anderson's Dune novels and Anderson's own Saga of Seven Suns aside, this is the start of a series that should be enjoyable to all who love science fiction.

    7 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 9, 2011

    I highly recommend this book for readers new and old to KJA and BH

    I just finished an advance copy of Hellhole by Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson. My first statement is that I thoroughly enjoyed it. From start to finish I found it to be "edge of my seat" engrossing. There were many times where one chapter ends on a cliff hanger, and I found that I had to restrict myself to not skip ahead to find out what happens to that one story line. But in slowing down my desire, I was able to appreciate the many different plot elements being attended to and how the separate story lines contributed to the greater narration of the overarching "story." Patience is a virtue in reading and acquiring the details of each character, their relationships amongst the many characters and the development of the culminating denouement. Here's how I know I like a writer, or in this case writers. For me, when I recall not only the plot action, but also the description of the people and places surrounding the activity vividly, that's when I know a writer has touched me as a reader. What is most satisfying occurs at the end of Hellhole is when all the different plots and subplots merge into the same "intersection" (as I'll call it). It is at this intersection that the different threads are clearly tied into one side or the other of book's "conflict." I find this type of cliffhanger to be fresh and inventive.

    I would recommend this book to both new to KJA/BH readers and veteran readers. I think that Hellhole is a great introduction to the combined writing styles of BH and KJA. I especially encourage "new-to-them" readers, because a new reader might not be put off by the immense and rich backstory that these authors tackled and are tackling with the Dune universe. With Hellhole, a new reader can begin with a fresh story line in an fresh and well fleshed out "universe." I would also recommend the premiere of this new trilogy for fans of BH and KJA as it shows how well their writing styles work together. BH and KJA have worked wonders to create a thrilling and copiously tethered story line that I believe will surely keep my interest for two more books.

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 26, 2012

    Loved the planet, the characters, and the plot. Can't wait for


    Loved the planet, the characters, and the plot. Can't wait for the next two books. I keep checking but don't have a clue as to when they will be published.

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 4, 2012

    This book does not earn the lavish praise that appears on the co

    This book does not earn the lavish praise that appears on the cover and elsewhere, although it could have. The plot has a clever angle with promise, but the characterization is extremely shallow and cartoon-like. Furthermore the authors frequently display a poor technique in some aspects of story telling: instead of creating and inserting anecdotal situations to reveal character or story details, they write a description or an explanation, put it into parentheses, and just stick it in there. It looks like someone performing a theatrical aside, saying a line to the audience behind the back side of his hand. My reaction in one such instance was, "Don't tell me this, that the General's men are extraordinarily loyal, show me." To me this book read more like a set up for a movie than like a good, solid, science fiction novel. On the bright side, the story has promise for a good epic series if the authors will work their craft more rigorously. They also need to get better support from the people who read the draft because the shortcomings are obvious and should have been fixed before the final.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 17, 2011

    So who wants to move to Hellhole??

    Loved every page! Fans of Dune must try this! The characters are great and the new worlds are fantastic. Oh and there are even some aliens! :)

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 7, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    This outer space science fiction thriller pays homage to Dune with the Hellhole environ

    From the frontier aptly titled planet Hellhole, exiled rebel General Tiber Adolphus remains adamant with his opposition to the avarice plots of the Crown Jewel worlds and Diadem Michella Duchenet. He and his cohorts know what they must do if they are to overcome the powerful elite, but to achieve it seems out of reach especially from the nightmarish orb they hide on. His side must find a means to end the royal space travel monopoly. Once that is achieved, they can go onto the next step which is to forge an alliance of Deep Zone planets.

    On Sonjeera far from the Deep Zone frontier planets, Diadem Michella has issues with the ancient noble families. At the same time her preoccupation means she and her advisors fail to notice Adolphus is implementing plans that could shake the royal stranglehold on space travel and beyond that much more.
    .
    This outer space science fiction thriller pays homage to Dune with the Hellhole environ, but takes its own overall entertaining spin in spite of none of the key cast breaking out of stereotypical roles. The story line is filled with action although the ending is a disappointment as that resolves nothing except set the stage for the next saga. Still fans of Dune will enjoy this epic offspring space opera.

    Harriet Klausner

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 17, 2013

    A lot of wasted filler

    A lot of wasted filler

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 12, 2012

    Do Not buy this book until the whole trilogy is complete and available.

    Shades of JR Ewing and Dallas - the first book does Not come to even a semi-conclusion, but is a cliff-hanger - without even an expected publication date on book 2 -- shame on Brian and Kevin - Frank must be doing multiple turns in his grave.
    Other than that, which is enough for a single star - would give the book a 3 to a 3.5.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 14, 2014

    Great Book

    It is well written, has a great plot, and has rich characters.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 23, 2013

    Excellent read!!

    Herbert and Anderson have created a believeable universe with equally believeable characters. This series promises to be as good and as readable as their Dune prequel series.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 19, 2013

    Overly long with unneccerary detail when brevity would suffice.

    A decent story line dragged out to the point of boredom.

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  • Posted May 22, 2011

    Wasn't great.

    Hellhole kind of sucked. The characters where somewhat interesting but the plot sucks and makes it very easy to see things coming. The whole book is just political posturing it can be very boring if you do not enjoy that sort of thing. A Sci Fi book without at least some action is kind of like a horror film with out anything scary.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 19, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

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    Posted November 13, 2011

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    Posted March 7, 2013

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    Posted March 25, 2011

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    Posted December 7, 2011

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    Posted June 4, 2013

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 29, 2012

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    Posted June 18, 2011

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