hello! hello!

( 1 )

Overview

Outside the world is bright and colorful, but Lydia's family is too busy with their gadgets to notice. She says Hello to everyone. Hello? Hello! Her father says hello while texting, her mother says hello while working on her laptop and her brother doesn't say hello at all. The T.V shouts Hello! But she doesn't want to watch any shows. Lydia, now restless, ventures outside. There are so many things to say hello to! Hello rocks! Hello leaves! Hello flowers! When Lydia comes back home she decides to show her family ...
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Overview

Outside the world is bright and colorful, but Lydia's family is too busy with their gadgets to notice. She says Hello to everyone. Hello? Hello! Her father says hello while texting, her mother says hello while working on her laptop and her brother doesn't say hello at all. The T.V shouts Hello! But she doesn't want to watch any shows. Lydia, now restless, ventures outside. There are so many things to say hello to! Hello rocks! Hello leaves! Hello flowers! When Lydia comes back home she decides to show her family what she has found, and it's hello world and goodbye gadgets!
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Cordell (Another Brother) outdoes himself with this silly, loving nose-tweak to digital civilization. Lydia’s electronic gadgets fail to charm her one afternoon, and her family members—all drawn in shades of gray—are lost in their own virtual worlds. “Pec Pec Pec,” her father texts in an anonymous LCD font. “Zap Beep Pow,” chirps her brother’s video game. Led outside by a stray leaf, Lydia discovers trees, bugs, flowers, and a horse who knows her name. The outdoor world appears in full color, Cordell’s text becomes hand-lettered, and the action unspools faster and faster. The horse carries Lydia through the flowers, picking up by twos and threes an improbable group of animal friends—a fish, a gorilla, a swan, even a whale—who chorus “hello” and thunder across the fields with them, until Lydia’s cellphone rings and everything comes to a halt. Fortunately, upon her return, Lydia is able to entice her family outside. The vision of Lydia and her escape is a glorious image of liberation; it’s required reading for any kid with a phone. Ages 2–6. Agent: Rosemary Stimola, Stimola Literary Studio. (Sept.)
School Library Journal
.K-Gr 6—Bored with her electronic equipment, a girl finds a new world to explore in this nearly wordless picture book. Cordell uses pen-and-ink and watercolor snapshots in a sea of white space to great effect, along with text in an old, impersonal computer typeface, to show the distance between the child and her parents and baby brother, all of whom are absorbed in their own devices. A colorful leaf blows through the door inviting the child outside where she encounters the sunny natural world in a spread that bursts with color. The limited text is now warm and handwritten. The girl says hello to a ladybug, a flower, and a horse. Her imagination soars as she rides the horse through this bright expanse and meets many animals-until her cell phone rings. The text goes back to the bland computer font and the page turns white as the horse stops suddenly, bringing the whole experience crashing to a halt. The girl rushes back to frantic, worried parents and the gray, electronic home she left behind. She gives her mother the gift of the leaf in exchange for the laptop, her father a flower in exchange for his phone, and introduces her brother to the ladybug. Together the family enjoys the outdoors. In fewer words than the standard tweet, Cordell shows how members of a family can reconnect. This is a must-have for starting a conversation about what can be experienced and shared with others once the electronic devices are turned off and the imagination is turned on.—Kristine M. Casper, Huntington Public Library, NY
Kirkus Reviews
Into a family's device-dominated existence, Cordell inserts this tribute to the realms of nature and the imagination. Lydia, bored with gadgets that fail to activate or stimulate, turns to parents and a brother too immersed in their own digital miasmas to look up. An open door and a fluttering leaf beckon, and Lydia, once outside, encounters a bug, a field of flowers and--leaping from the natural to the fantastic--a horse who greets her by name. In ensuing double-page spreads, the galloping girl is joined by an increasingly exotic horde of animals--from bison to gorilla, T. rex to blue whale. With her cellphone's "RING RING RING," it all comes to a screeching halt, as both parents call her home. Now nature's ambassador, Lydia--always depicted in color against the tonal gray-washes of her home and family--exchanges Mom's laptop for a leaf, Dad's PDA for a flower and brother Bob's tablet for the ladybug that's clung to her dress throughout her adventure. Inked letters toggle between a digital look (for the device-obsessive scenes) and a brushy, casually penned script for the wider world. In the charming penultimate spread, the family (with that ladybug now clinging to Bob) admires the falling leaves; in the last, all four ride careening (or swimming) animals. This wry object lesson blends clever design and a sincere, never-preachy delivery. Terrific! (Picture book. 3-7)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781423159063
  • Publisher: Disney-Hyperion
  • Publication date: 10/30/2012
  • Pages: 56
  • Sales rank: 294,588
  • Age range: 2 - 6 Years
  • Product dimensions: 9.40 (w) x 8.40 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Matthew Cordell's (www.matthewcordell.com/) earliest memory is drawing George Washington on horseback, an illustration that managed to impress his brother's first grade teacher. Ever since then he has pursued his artistic passions, which eventually led him to travel to Chicago, where he met his wife, discovered his love for Children's books and started getting published. He has illustrated many picture books including, Toby and the Snowflakes, and Righty and Lefty. His first authored work is Trouble Gum, which he illustrated himself. He currently resides in the suburbs of Chicago with his wife, Julie Halpern, and daughter.
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 20, 2013

    Lydia's family is busy using their electronics so Lydia journeys

    Lydia's family is busy using their electronics so Lydia journeys outside and discovers flowers and bugs and animals. She forgets to tell her family where she is so they soon call her and she rushes home but with her she brings a bit of the outside back to them. The story ends with the family outside enjoying nature at it's best. The beginning of the story is written in cell phone text which I found to be very appropriate. Once Lydia journeys outside the text changes and the colors get brighter. A great story to remind you to stop and smell the roses.

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